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Full text of "Blade Magazine"

sharp ONE-MAN KNIFE SHOWS— HERE TO STAY? 



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THE WORLD'S #i1i KNIF 




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March 2006 



THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLIC AT I 





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1 2 Get In the Tactical Fixed Blade Zone 

Sample some of the hottest factory examples. By Joe Kertzman 

20 The One-Man Knife Show 

The single-maker event — a trend in the making? By B.R. Hughes 

24 Are Two Hands Better Than One? 

Learn the history of the two-hand sword. By Hank Reinhardt 

32 Know When To Fold 'Em 

Ed VanHoy's ascendancy has been meteoric. By Mike Haskew 

38 Honey of a Subhilt 

This heavy-duty knife handles light duty, too. By MSG Kim Breed 

42 Hot Locks & Fast Folders 

Consider the latest safe and secure models. By Anthony Lombardo 

50 Steel Synergy in Motion 

Why Art Deco is ideal for art knives. By Don Guild 

58 Evolution by Generation 

See how Dan Farr's competition knife evolved. By Roger Pinnock 

90 The Half-Century Collection 

Gary Smith's knives are a history of handmades. By Mike Haskew 

94 EDGES Pick of the Picks 

The most overlooked collecting specialty? By Richard D. White 

1 02 New Knives Annual Rocks! 

More knives in color than any other book. By BLADE® staff 

116 South from Alaska 

Adam Des Rosiers is pushing the edge envelope. By Les Robertson 

1 22 Makers To Watch in 2006 

These five cutlers bear close scrutiny. By Steve Shackleford 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




POTLIGHT 

6 Readers Respoi 

7 Cover Story 
10 Unsheathed 

18 The Knife I Carry 

66 BLADE Shoppe 

73 Show Calendar 

74 BLADE List 

74 Classified Ads 

75 Ad Index 

76 What's New 

78 Knifemaker Showcase 

80 Wayne Goddard's Q&A 

84 The Year In Review 

88 Ed Fowler's Knife Talk 

98 Where To Get 'Em 

100 Where To Net 'Em 

108 Edge Testers: DMT DuoSharp 

112 Next In BLADE® 

114 Case Contest Winner 

130 Hot Handmade 




defining the art 
U knifemaking 





To learn more, co.. 
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William Henry Authorized 

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William Henry's renowned beauty and 
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(Tv& William Henry 

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KNIFEMAKING^ 




MARCH 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE / 5 




S^i^ct?©©^®^^ 



This Is Your Column! And we want to know what you think. 
Do you like what you've read in BLADE®? Do you have a 
complaint? A suggestion? An opinion you'd like to share with 
the largest knife audience in the world? Mail your comments 



to: BLADE, P.O. Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789, or visit 
our website: www.blademag.com or e-mail: blademagazine® 
krause.com. We reserve the right to edit your comments to fit 
the space available. 



Airport Baggage Inspections 

he January BLADE® included two 

letters from readers about knives lost 
from unlocked checked baggage while 
traveling by airliner. 

First, luggage "locks" have never been 
about security. Depending on when it was 
made and the model, every Samsonite® 
hard-sided suitcase will open with one 
of just two keys, both of which can be 
purchased at any luggage store. Other 
luggage manufacturers are very similar. 
The "locks" on suitcases are intended to 
keep the latches and the bags from acciden- 
tal opening during handling — that is all. 

As a result, under the new procedures of 
the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA), Americans have not really lost any of 
their rights. In other words, you cannot lose 
something you never had in the first place. 

Second, the inspection of checked 
baggage is not a result of TSA policy or the 
terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Instead, it 
dates back to the bombing of Pan Am Flight 
103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec. 21, 
1988. Shortly after the Pan Am incident, 
the Federal Aviation Administration began 
randomly inspecting a fraction of checked 
baggage on most international flights and 
also a fraction of domestic flights. The 
searches included high-power, 3-D X-ray 
(the "CTX machine") of and also the open- 
ing and physical inspection of checked 
baggage without the knowledge or permis- 
sion of the passenger. What is new post-9/1 1 
and under TSA is the goal to inspect 100 
percent of checked baggage on all flights 
instead of just a fraction of the total. 

Finally, what BLADE readers who 
travel with expensive knives need to know 
is that TSA rules allow you to be physically 
present and observe when your checked 
baggage is inspected, and then to lock your 
bag in any way you wish afterward. Yes, 
you can do this! The procedure varies from 
airport to airport, not airline to airline. The 
reason it varies from airport to airport is 
that how airports are implementing the 
TSA inspection process depends on the 
architecture of each individual airport. 

For example, here in Portland, Oregon, 
departing passengers check in at the airline 
desk and are then instructed to carry their 
checked baggage to a CTX station on the 
other side of the ticket lobby, where the 
bags are inspected. At the CTX station, you 



simply ask to observe and lock your bag 
afterward, and the TSA people manning the 
stations have always been quite good about 
it for me. 

Recently, I flew back from the Chicago 
Custom Knife Show with some expensive 
knives in my checked baggage. The ticket 
agent told me that it was not permissible 
for me to observe the inspection nor for me 
to lock my bag afterward. I insisted it was. 
The agent called a supervisor over and the 
supervisor corrected the agent and escorted 
me and my bag back to the CTX machine, 
where I observed the inspection and locked 
my bag afterward. It is always permis- 
sible and always possible to observe such 
inspections. The TSA rules allow it. 

Sometimes, you just have to insist on it. 

Chuck Gollnick, Sherwood, Oregon 
A Glaring Omission 

It was disappointing not to see any 
mention of the late, great Harvey 
McBurnette in "The Finishing Flourish" in 
the September BLADE. No discussion of 
filework is complete without recognizing 
the contributions of Harvey, a proponent 
of the mid-lock folder and a believer in 
sole authorship. Harvey was an excellent 
engraver and he embellished many of his 
knives with filework as well. His filework 
may not have had all the frills and flour- 
ishes of present-day makers, but he did 
very clean, simple designs. In addition, I 
imagine he influenced a number of makers 
to enter the world of the file. 

John Stahl, Naldwin, New York 

A fine scrimshander in his own right, Mr. 
Stahl is, of course, correct. BLADE apolo- 
gizes for not mentioning Harvey s lasting 
contributions in filework and salutes him as 
the pioneer knifemaker that he truly was. 

For D.E.— Sort Of 

The fact that the Blade Magazine Cutlery 
Hall of Fame© has not acknowledged 
D.E. Henry can only be because of the 
politics connected with Henry being 
universally disliked. It certainly does 
not acknowledge his talent as one of the 
premier makers of handmade knives. His 
knives were not only "top of the line" in the 



1970s, but they continue to stand at the top 
of the line 30 years later. 

I have a very large collection of 
handmade bowies, including some of 
Henry's manufacture, and consider them 
to be among the best I have, not only for 
workmanship, but also for overall design 
and faithfulness to the historical type that 
they represent. 

I met D.E. on several occasions. I have 
never met a bigger jerk in my life. But as far 
as knifemaking talent, I have never met one 
better. I definitely believe that he should be 
inducted into the Hall of Fame. 

Name and address n/a 

Proud All Over Again 

I just wanted to thank you for your arti- 
cle in the January BLADE ("A Band of 
Brothers"). Including the messages from 
our soldiers in the story was inspired and 
fantastic. It made my wife cry and me 
proud all over again. 
Thank you! 

Dave Larsen, Des Moines, Iowa 

Carving Set Contact 

I want to thank you for putting the picture 
of my carving set in the story, "No 
Matter How You Slice It," in the November 
BLADE. I was very surprised to see the 
picture. However, there was no contact 
information with it, so here it is: Kenneth 
L. Brock, Brock Custom Knives, attn: 
Kenneth L. Brock, Dept. BL3, P.O. Box 
375, Allenspark, CO 80510 303.747.2547 
brockknives@nedernet.net. 

Kenneth Brock, Allenspark, Colorado 

Thanks For Playing! 

I want to thank BLADE for sponsor- 
ing the BLADE Show Win-a-Blade 
contest in which I won a beautiful knife 
from Twin Blades. 1 was expecting a 
small hunter and was blown away when I 
received such a large, well-made piece. I 
have written Twin Blades also, thanking 
them for offering up such a fine knife. 

Jon Friday, Lexington, South Carolina 



6 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




hotographer Bob Best wraps both 
hands around the 13%-inch leather- 
wrapped hilt of CAS/Hanwei's Claymore 

on the cover of this issue. Designed to 
easily accommodate grasping with two 
hands, the claymore's hilt is equipped with 
a classic down-sloping guard highlighted 
by a distinctive quatrefoil on the end of 
each quillon. 

The 41 -inch blade is 1065 steel. The 
Scottish two-hand sword is 54% inches 
long overall and weighs 4 pounds, 14 
ounces. MSRP: $285. 



"The claymore's 
hilt is equipped 
with a classic down- 
sloping guard.'" 

— the author 



For a full view of the cover piece, 
see the story by BLADE® field editor 
Hank Reinhardt on two-hand swords 
beginning on page 24. For more informa- 
tion on the cover claymore, contact CAS/ 
Hanwei, attn: P. Shipley, Dept. BL3, 650 
Industrial Blvd., Sale Creek, TN 37373 
423.332.4700 www.casiberia.com. 

The cover photo is by Kris Kandler. 

Blade 



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Presentation grade mother of pearl coined end Baby Sunfish (3-5/8" Closed). 
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MARCH 2006 



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WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION 



Vol. XXXIII, No. 3, March 2006 



Publishers Of 



World Knife Collecting & Inventing 



&AD6 



1 



FT""! 



700 E. State St., Iola, WI 54990-0001 

715.445.2214 www.blademag.com 

blademagazine@krause.com 



Group Publisher 

Hugh McAloon 

Publisher 

Brad Rucks 

Editor 

Steve Shackleford 

Managing Editor 

Joe Kertzman 

Field Editors 

Ed Fowler, Wayne Goddard, MSG Kim 

Breed, Jerry Fisk, Dexter Ewing, Hank 

Reinhardt, B.R. Hughes, Lowell Bray, 

Steve Schwarzer, Richard D. White 



Advertising Manager 

Gregg Gutschow 

Advertising Sales 

Missy Beyer, Ext. 642 
Bruce Wolberg, Ext. 403 

A dvertising A ssistan t 

Mary Ann Rice 



Art Director 

Craig Netzer 

Graphic Designer 

Jeromy Boutwell 

F+W Publications, Inc. 

David H. Steward, Chairman & CEO 

Peter Saretsky, EVP, Chief Financial Officer 

Andrew Levy, SVR Development and Strategy 

Barbara Schmitz, VP, Manufacturing 

F+JV Publications, Inc. Magazine Group 

William R. Reed, President 

Susan Du Bois, VP, Consumer Marketing 

Matt Friedersdorf, Director, Business Planning 

Sara Dumford, Conference Director 

Subscription Services: 800.258.0929 
12 ISSUES $25.98 ABBL63 

BLADE® (ISSN 1064-5853) is published monthly, includ- 
ing the directory and calendar issues, by F+W Publications, 
Inc., 700 E. State St., Iola, WI 54990-001. Periodical postage 
paid at Iola, Wis., and at additional mailing offices. Canadian 
Agreement Number: 40665675. POSTMASTER: Send address 
changes to BLADE. Circulation Department, 700 E. State St., 
Iola, WI 54945. Copyright 2006 by F+W Publications, Inc. 
BLADE and its logo are registered trademarks. Other names 
and logos referred to or displayed in editorial or advertising 
content may be trademarked or copyright. BLADE assumes 
no responsibility for unsolicited materials sent to it. Publisher 
and advertisers are not liable for typographical errors that 
may appear in prices or descriptions in advertisements. The 
possession, transportation and sale of certain types of knives is 
restricted or prohibited by federal, state and local laws. BLADE 
and F+W Publications, Inc. rely upon the fact that collectors, 
dealers, exhibitors, advertisers and manufacturers are expected 
to know and comply with these regulations. 



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8 / BLADE 



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unsheathed 



By Steve Shackleford 



Wish List For a Happy 
New Knife Year 




Iappy New Knife Year, good health, 
happiness and prosperity to you 
and yours! If 2006 is anything like 
2005 — see the story on page 84 for the 
year's noteworthy happenings — it will be 
another whirlwind affair of highs, lows and 
everything in between. 

As the BLADE® staff busies itself 
making the magazine the best it can be for 
you in the year ahead, it is my privilege to 
compile a wish list of events that I would 
like to occur over that span. While some 
are more attainable than others, I believe 
that all are within reach. If you have any 
you would like to add, please send them to 
my attention c/o BLADE: 

•That the rumors that the upcoming 
Rambo movie, slated for a summer release, 
will downplay lead character John Rambo 's 
knife are unfounded. Also, that the movie 
creates widespread interest similar to that 
of the survival knife craze of the 1980s 
in whatever style of knife Rambo uses 
(hopefully) in the new film, as well as refo- 
cuses attention on the original Rambo knife 
made by Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famer© Jimmy Lile and the later edition 
made by Hall-Of-Famer Gil Hibben; 

•That the factory/factory collabora- 
tions between Buck and Strider, Gerber and 
Emerson, and Spyderco and Kershaw — the 
latter resulting in the Spyker, the Blade 
Magazine 2005 Collaboration Of The 
Year® — are emulated by other compa- 
nies. For instance, it would be interesting 
to see a Ka-Bar/Ontario military knife, a 
Chris Reeve Knives/William Henry Knives 
utility/gent's folder, a Case/Queen classic 
pocketknife, a Kershaw/Columbia River 
Knife & Tool mechanism folder or (enter 
your factory /factory collaboration here); 

•That the effort among bladesmiths and 
an unnamed steel maker to create a "new 
and improved" carbon steel that would be 
targeted specifically for knife blades bears 
fruit; 

•That the cutting competitions continue 
to thrive and efforts to open them up to 
contestants from all walks of knifemaking 
continue as well; 

•That the federal government realizes 
that banning the carrying of pocketknives on 

10 /BLADE 





The new year will no doubt produce its fair share of imaginative knives. Frank 
Gamble carved the 440C stainless blade of his Last Flight fantasy knife by 
hand using files only. His address: 4676 Commercial St. SE #26, Dept. BL3, 
Salem, OR 97302 503.581.7993. (BladeGallery.com photo) 



\ 
board 
airlin- 
ers serves 
no purpose 
whatsoever other 
than to harass law- 
abiding citizens and to 
eliminate jobs by damaging 
the overall health of the knife industry; 

•That the government of India quits 
playing now-you-see-it-now-you-don't 
with sambar stag and institutes a rational 
policy regulating the export of the popular 
knife-handle material; 

•That our knife friends in England get 
some relief from the anti-knife mental- 
ity that is rampant among many in power 
there; 

•That Pete Cohan and the folks at the 
National Knife Museum have smooth 
sailing in getting the new National Knife 
Museum up and running at Smoky Moun- 
tain Knife Works this summer. From the 
sounds of it, it will be worth waiting for; 

•That the 30 tn anniversary year of the 
American Bladesmith Society and the 25 
anniversary BLADE Show will each be 
"one for the books"; 

•That The Knifemakers' Guild enjoys 
continued success in upgrading its show 
and its overall mission in the knife commu- 
nity; 

•That the ABS and Shepherd Hills 
Cutlery receive more support for their 
knife programs for children (for more 
information contact the ABS, attn: Joe 
Keeslar, Dept. BL3, 391 Radio Rd., Almo, 
KY 42020 270.753.7919 sjkees@apex. 
net, and/or Shepherd Hills Cutlery, attn: R. 
Reid, Dept. BL3, POB 909, Lebanon, MO 
65536 800.727.4643 www.casexx.com); 

•That David Morrell, author of the 
original Rambo book, First Blood, contin- 
ues to pen such novels as The Protector 
and his most recent offering, the highly 



entertaining Creep- 
ers. The latter two feature 
the knives of Ernest Emer- 
son prominently and by so doing 
stress the utility and vitality of knives 
to an ever-growing audience; 

•There was a line in an old Western that 
went something like, "We'll give him a fair 
trial — then we'll hang him!" I'm not saying 
I hope that will be the case with Saddam 
Hussein but if it does turn out that way, 
let's just say I won't give up watching John 
Wayne movies as a result; 

•That knife enthusiasts everywhere 
continue to back our soldiers at war, not 
only by word of mouth but by supporting 
such programs as Smoky Mountain Knife 
Works' "A Knife For A Soldier" and a simi- 
lar effort under the aegis of Knife World 
(contact Smoky at 800.251.9306 www. 
eKnifeWorks.com, and/or Knife World at 
865.397.1955 www.knifeworld.com for 
more information); and; 

•Most of all, that enough progress is 
made in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan 
so that positive resolutions to the conflicts 
are in sight and some semblance of order 
is brought to those troubled lands, and we 
can start planning to bring our heroes in 
uniform home where they belong. 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



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Knifemaker Bob Lum says that, in common 
terms today, most people define any black 
knife as a tactical. Lum designed the Bob 
Lum Encounter Fixed Blade for A.G. Russell 
Knives, and if there's one thing the knife 
;, it's black. It sports a 5 1/4-inch, black, 
Teflon ™-coated ATS-34 blade and a 
black-anodized 6061-T6 aluminum 
handle. The MSRP: $145. 




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C^n you peel the power of thi 
newest, hottest break-out 
tactical fixed blade; 



12 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



1ARCH 2006 





The Gerber Sheridan is an all- 
black tanto born from what 
Mark Schindel of Gerber 
Legendary Blades claims 
was quite a bit of market 
research prior to manufac 
ture. It sports a 4.76-inch, 
full-tang, semi-serrated, 
high-carbon stainless 
steel tanto blade, a 
textured, glass-filled- 
nylon handle, and a 
black Kydex® sheath 
with leg straps and a 
belt loop. The MSRP: 
$74.99. 



' hey're not making any bones 
about it. No one's blowing any 
smoke. It's straight talk from 
the get-go — in-your-face honesty. Tactical 
fixed blades are still hot. The black, brown, 
gray and olive-drab, no-nonsense, forget- 
the-frills tacticals have few fancy curves 
and fewer bells, whistles, gadgets or gim- 
micks. They're meant to cut, crank, slice 
and dice, and the freshest of the straight 
tacticals don't disappoint. 

Bob Dozier designed Ka-Bar's latest 
tactical fixed blade — the KBD1 — with few 
frills. "The bottom line is that it's a bare- 
bones serviceman's knife. It's inexpensive 
and it wasn't made to be exotic looking," 
Dozier remarks. The KBD1 features a 7- 
inch, flat-ground, black-powder-coated 
1095 blade and a black, oval Kraton® han- 
dle. It stretches 11 3/4 inches overall and 
carries a manufacturer's suggested retail 
price (MSRP) of $82.03. 

Just because it isn't fancy doesn't mean 
the KBD1 won't perform. Dozier says the 
Kraton handle is "grabby," so it won't slide 
out of the user's hand, it won't rust, and 
since Kraton is inexpensive, it helps keep 
the price down. "That's a big part of Ka- 
Bar's philosophy when making knives," he 
notes. "You've got to make a serviceable 
knife that will cut and function well, but 
the price has to be right. 

"There's a little belly in the blade," he 
explains. "When you chop with a big knife, 



there's a tendency for your hand to turn 
down and the knife blade to swing up a bit. 
The belly in the blade kind of hooks into 
what you're cutting. 

"I think the swedge along the blade 
spine is there for looks. A swedge [or un- 
sharpened top edge] is an accepted thing — 
everyone says a little false edge will help 
when you stab something," Dozier adds. "I 
think it's for looks." 

It could be that the swedge is what 
helps make the fixed blade look "tactical," 
at least according to knifemaker Bob Lum. 
"In common terms today, most people de- 
fine any black knife as a tactical, and the 
name itself invokes an image of a defensive 
or even an offensive weapon. It invokes al- 
most a militaristic image, and we're at war, 
so there's the military genre of knife that 
could be called tactical. 

"Generally, a tactical piece will have 
a swedge, or double edge — a lot of them 
do, and they're more agressive looking. 
That, of course, could vary," Lum ex- 
pounds. "The blade could be pointy, or 
it could be a knife with a wildly curved 
blade for slashing." 

Lum designed the Bob Lum Encounter 
Fixed Blade for A.G. Russell Knives, and 
if there's one thing the knife is, it's black. It 
sports a 5 1/4-inch, black, Teflon™-coated 
ATS-34 blade, a black-anodized 6061-T6 




/ / 
/ / / 



It's all about choices when it comes to 
the Busse Hell Razor. The tactical fixed 
blade comes in a black, tan, urban-gray 
or green * 'corrugated' '-INFI-steel blade, 
and handle choices include black-can- 
vas Micarta®, tan-canvas Micarta and 
black-paper Micarta. The MSRP: $287. 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 13 



Green Beret Knife 

Efficient, tough, / 

exceptional 

Words that describe the 
men of the U.S. Army 
Special Forces. 

Words I ha I describe 
[he knife designed 
specifically for these 
men - the knife that 
is presented to every m 
graduate from /'i 

Special forces ^n 
Qualification 
Course - the 
Ya rb o rough. 

Identical except 
for the markings. 
Tlu' Green Beret 
Knife is a 
no-nonsense, 
hardworking 
tool, desianed 
byBillHarsey 
and made to 
the legendary 
standards of 
quality by 
Chris Reeve 
Knives. 



7 inch blade. 

CTM S30V 

coated with 

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grey canvas micarta handles. 

Ready for a lifetime of 
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Bob Dozier designed Ka-Bar's latest 
tactical fixed blade— the KBD1—with 
few frills. It dons a 7-inch, flat-ground, 
black-powder-coated 1095 blade 
and a black, oval Kraton® handle. It 
stretches 11 3/4 inches overall and 
carries an MSRP of $82.03. 




aluminum handle and a brown-leather 
pouch sheath. It is 10 1/2 inches overall, 
weighs in at 6.6 ounces and carries an 
MSRP of $145. 

A Utilitarian Tactical 

As tactical as it looks, Lum says the piece 



is actually a utilitarian design — a perfect 
all-around camp knife for cutting bacon 
and making meals. It is slim, the handle 
slabs are fairly flat, and it's comfortable 
to carry. "It's a conservative design," Lum 
says. "The blade has a nice curve, and it is 
flat ground so it's thin. 



14/ BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



"This fits in with A.G. Russell's cus- 
tomers who might be hunters or fisher- 
men. It's a great knife to have in your 
backpack when wandering around," Lum 
states. "The design, with the small, inte- 
gral guard, is simple, yet you can still feel 
where the guard is and choke up on it. 

"If I ran a swedge along the top of the 
blade and gave the knife a double guard, 
then people would be more apt to say it's a 
tactical knife," Lum concludes. 

Dozier weighs in on the necessity of 
guards for today's tactical fixed blades. 
"A tactical knife is anything you carry 
with you that can be used for self-defense 
to ward someone off," he says. "Anything 
with a sharp edge and a point could be tac- 
tical. A butcher knife is tactical if it has an 
edge and a point, and if it's quick moving 
and strategic. 



"It's a cutter, a 

sticker, a pry 

bar, anything an 

old jar head would 

want to do with a 

knife." 

— Bob Dozier 



"The guard is put there to prevent 
the hand from slipping onto the blade," 
Dozier relates. "I have a friend who was 
the chief criminal investigator for the 
Arkansas State Police. He said, almost 
without exception, for every stabbing he 
investigated, when he apprehended the 
suspect, he first had to take the guy to the 
hospital to get his hand sewed shut." 

Dozier says he has no professional tac- 
tical training, so when designing a knife, 
he looks at what other makers are doing 
and listens to what they talk about. "I 
imagine having to ward someone off with 
a knife, and I make a knife that will work," 
he says. "Even though I view the KBD1 as 
a serviceman's knife — a fighter — few of 
them will ever be fought with. It's a cutter, 
a sticker, a pry bar, anything an old jarhead 
would want to do with a knife." 

Dozier also recognizes the advan- 
tages of making a knife — even a tacti- 
cal fixed blade — visually appealing. "We 
carry knives because we want our bud- 
dies to see us with them, and we carry 
knives we think look good," he reasons. 
"If you went hunting and killed the big- 
gest deer anyone had ever killed in his- 
tory, but if you knew that no one besides 
you would ever see it, you wouldn't have 
it mounted. You don't want to sit and 



The Al Mar Shiva is marketed as a slim combat 
knife that can be used in the field for a variety 
of purposes. Offered with a laminated blade 
(VG-10 sandwiched between layers of400-se- 
ries stainless steel), the newest incarnation of 
the Shiva marries the laminated blade with a 
contoured and polished black-Micarta® handle, 
a satin-finished stainless steel guard and a 
black-leather sheath. The MSRP: $459. 





Knifemaker Barry Gallagher is noted for his one-of-a-kind collectible art knives in exotic 

materials. Our production Montana Gentleman designs allow you to own a Gallagher knife 
inspired by liis I lailiasuis I liiiiiiii:n;;l>inl. Both Versions luiv nnr sl;iir:lrss siivi Inlrr 
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CNC machined "file work" [ratteni back spacer and custom stainless steel clips. The 
7402SK has a black titanium nitride coated frame, satin bead blast blade, gray scales and 
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MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 15 



tactics 

look at it — you want your buddies to see 
it. It's the same with a knife." 

Jerry Busse of Busse Combat Knife 
Co. wanted the 12 1/2-inch Hell Razor to 
look good, and he says it is "one of the 
meanest models to ever escape the Busse 
Combat shop." He also claims that corru- 
gations running lengthwise along the full- 
tang INFI-steel blade not only look good, 
they also strengthen the blade, reduce its 
weight and reduce cutting friction along 
the height of the blade bevel. 

The tactical fixed blade comes in 
black, tan, urban-gray or green blade 
coatings, and handle choices include 
black-canvas Micarta®, tan-canvas Mi- 
carta and black-paper Micarta. The knife 
weighs 14 ounces and carries an MSRP 
of $287. 

A Throwback Tactical 

Chris Cashbaugh likes the sculpted guard 
and pommel of the new SOG Specialty 
Knives Gov-Tac fixed blade. "The sculpt- 
ed guard and pommel are reminiscent of 
the SOG Bowie, the first knife SOG pro- 
duced," Cashbaugh says, "and a throw- 
back to traditional knife construction, 
back to a time when they actually forged 
guards. That's what we tried to mimic." 
The Gov-Tac's 6.1-inch AUS-8 blade 




Chris Cashbaugh 
likes the sculpted 
guard and pom- 
mel of the new SOG Specialty 
Knives Gov-Tac fixed blade. The 
knife's 6. 1-inch AUS-8 blade is 
treated with a black-titanium- 
nitride coating and comple- 
mented by a checkered-Kra- 
tone handle, black and gray 
washers and a titanium-ni- 
tride-coated stainless steel 
cross-guard and pommel, 
the latter capable of being 
used as a field hammer. 
The knife weighs 9.6 
ounces and carries an 
MSRP of $132. 



TM 

A. G. Russell Knives 



A. G. Russell 

knives 



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experience has established us as the 
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world. Lines include A. G. Russell, 
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knife needs go to the name you can 
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© Copyright 2006. A. G. Russdl Knives, Inc. 



is treated with a black-titanium-nitride 
coating and complemented by a check- 
ered-Kraton handle, black and gray 
washers and a titanium-nitride-coated 
stainless steel cross-guard and pommel, 
the latter capable of being used as a field 
hammer. The knife weighs 9.6 ounces 
and carries an MSRP of $132. 

"The combination of a molded-rub- 
ber grip with washers was a new thing 
for us and new in the industry," Cash- 
baugh says. "Add to that the titanium- 
nitride-coated blade, guard and pommel, 
and I like the look of the knife. We're 
kind of doing the new retro thing. 1 call 
it 'newvo.'" 

Cashbaugh also has ideas of why 
tactical fixed blades and folders have 
remained so popular for such a long pe- 
riod of time in the knife industry. "If you 
look at what SOG and a lot of other com- 
panies are doing — the black blades, the 
stealth-looking, overbuilt knives — it is 
still where the trend is," he says. 

"Younger people are coming into the 
market and they're more into the whole 
tactical thing, buying knives that are 
tactical, wearing tactical clothing, and 



16 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



they're living the lifestyle. Honestly, I 
think it has a lot to do with being raised 
on video games like Doom, Tom Clancy 
Splinter and Halo" Cashbaugh reasons. 

The military also makes up a large 
portion of the customer base for this type 
of knife, according to Cashbaugh, who 
envisions soldiers using the Gov-Tac in 
the field for such chores as opening am- 
munition boxes, prying open doors and 
cutting kindling. 

"A hunter in the backcountry might 
need a substantial, hard-use knife to cut 
firewood or dress an animal," he says. 
"As far as police go, I don't think patrol 
officers would be allowed to carry such 
large fixed blades, but SWAT team mem- 
bers and wildlife officers use them." 

The Al Mar Shiva is marketed as a 
slim combat knife that can be used in the 
field as an effective hunting and camping 
knife. Offered with a laminated blade 
(VG-10 sandwiched between layers of 
400-series stainless steel), Al Mar offi- 
cials claim the lamination increases the 
lateral strength of the blade more than 30 
percent over similar steel models. 

The newest incarnation of the Shiva 
marries the laminated blade with a con- 
toured and polished black-Micarta handle, 
a satin-finished stainless steel guard and a 
black-leather sheath. The MSRP: $459. 

The Gerber Sheridan is an all-black 
tanto born from what Mark Schindel of 



Gerber Legendary Blades claims was quite 
a bit of market research prior to manufac- 
ture. "In the last few years, we've talked 
to customers [knife retailers and dealers] 
and end users who are attached to the tac- 
tical market," he relates. "Those custom- 
ers said there is demand for a fixed-blade, 
American-style tanto, and they wanted it 
to come in at a decent price point to fill a 
gap in their lineups." 

A Tactical Tanto 

The Sheridan sports a 4.76-inch, full-tang, 
semi-serrated, high-carbon stainless steel 
tanto blade, complete with finger grooves 
and a deep choil, and treated with a matte- 
black coating. A textured, glass-filled- 
nylon handle and a black Kydex® sheath 
with leg straps and a belt loop round out 
the package. The MSRP: $74.99. 

"When you look at the [online] 
knife forums, people swear against ser- 
rated edges because they are difficult to 
sharpen," Schindel says. "But the SEALs 
and Spec Ops guys want aggressive cut- 
ting, and that's what serrations give you. 
When considering tacticals, you're usu- 
ally talking about military, police and 
fire and rescue customers. 

"A good deal of the popularity of 
fixed-blade tacticals is driven by the 
war," he adds. "The style of tactical fixed 
blades is changing. Chief ["Patches"] 
Watson, who was a jungle operator, de- 



signed our Silver Trident with a long 
blade for cutting and slashing. 

"Guys in the 'sandbox' [Iraq, Af- 
ghanistan and elsewhere in the Middle 
East] want shorter, beefier blades," 
Schindel notes. "The Spec Ops sniper 
teams are shooting from inside buildings 
and punching holes through bricks and 
mortar. They can [pry] on shorter blades 
to enlarge the holes, or use the blades to 
punch out car windows." 

The handle butt of the Sheridan 
doubles as a modern version of a skull 
crusher for knocking out windows, or 
for using it in close-quarters combat to 
control an enemy using pressure points, 
according to Schindel. 

Black is a popular color for tactical 
SWAT teams, Schindel notes, adding 
that coyote brown is a more conducive, 
concealable color for soldiers carrying 
knives in the Middle East. "You're go- 
ing to see new knives coming out at the 
2006 S.H.O.T. Show in a modern military 
green," he predicts. "The military wants 
it to blend into their uniforms wherever 
they go — a neutral camouflage color." 

For the addresses of the knife companies 
mentioned in this story, see "Where To 
Get 'Em" on page 98. 



Handle Material - Reconstituted 
Stone, Micartas, Stabilized Woods, 
Mother of Pearl, Water Buffalo, Mam- 
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Metals - Nickel Silver, Brass, Stain- 
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Blade Kits are available for most 
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MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 17 








i carry 



"I'm 67 and have been carrying a knife since I was very 
young. My all-around knife of choice for any and all 
cutting chores, up to and including self-defense, is my 
CUDA Dominator assisted opener by Camillus. It's 
a handful but light as a feather. It's always with me, even 
when I carry my other knives." 

— Ken Rozika, "Skinny's Toothpicks," Hazleton, Indiana 



"After hearing about the Colorado rock climber who amputated his 
arm to free himself from a pinning boulder, I vowed never to make 
another solo wilderness trek without carrying something signifi- 
cant. The Randall is my own design, a 6-inch sawback Model 1 
with a nickel-silver butt plate and forward-curved double hilt. The 
commando handle is made of buckeye burl that I bought from a 
vendor. It's one of a kind! I've put it to such tasks as carving the 
Thanksgiving turkey, cutting down tough weeds and trimming trees 
in the backyard. I bought the mammoth ivory damascus folder at 
the Festival du Couteau in Thiers, France, from renowned blademaker 
Jean-Pierre Veysseyre. With its slender grip and light weight, it's 
perfect for more delicate tasks that require razor-sharp precision." 

— "Tracker Kate" Mark, San Diego, California 




it 



I have a fondness for Case knives. 1 bought my 
first one in 1988 and have since collected about 
76 Case knives. I carry a two-blade, yellow- 
handle Case 32087 penknife every day. 

— Lamar Humphries, Danville, Georgia 



11 



Just tell us briefly what knife you carry. 
Add a little history or an interesting 
anecdote. Try to include a sharp photo- 
graph of you and your knife. We will 
publish your comments in an upcom- 
ing "The Knife I Carry." Your name will 
then be entered in a drawing to win a 
free, high-quality, name-brand pock- 
etknife. The drawing will be held May 
15. Mail to: BLADE Magazine®, P.O. 
Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789, or 
e-mail blademagazine@krause.com. If 
you send your entry by e-mail, please 
include your mailing address in case 
you win the drawing for the pocketknife. 



18/ BLADE 



blademag.com 




MARCH 2006 



Double Tree 

BOKER 'S FINEST 



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2525 24DT 







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This tang stamp is our 
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The Tree as Boker's trademark is as old as the com- 
pany - 138 years. A real chestnut tree growing close to 
the plant gave Heinrich Boker the idea to choose this 
symbol for quality. Don't forget, back in 1867, Heinrich 
was already exporting to Africa and South America, 
where only a few people could read the company's 
name. Today the Tree logo is worth more than our 
new plant. It is our seal for the product made by us, in 
Solingen, Germany. It guarantees your knife is an 
original Boker. In today's extremely competitive 
environment, ideas, designs, materials and technical 
concepts are routinely stolen. But the Tree Brand is ours 
alone and we protect it as our treasure. 
In an era of cost cutting and mass marketing, the 
Double Tree series reconfirms our ongoing commitment 
to quality. For Double Tree we selected 6 very traditional 
Boker patterns. We will only make 1,000 pieces of each 
pattern, with the choice of 3 handle materials. 
The Trapper (Model 2525) and the Congress (Model 
5464) will be introduced first - 200 pieces in pearl ' 
pieces in sambar stag and 500 pieces in jig — 
bone. The decorative bolsters are castings out 
silver and the Solingen stainless steel blades show o!d 
grinding patterns and are mirror polished. Each knife 
features brass liners and stainless steel springs. 
All knives are presented i 





3 1/2" clip and spey blades. Closed length; 4". 



2525 24DT. Genuine Mother of Pearl handles. $ 199.00 
2525 23DT. Genuine sambar stag handles. $ 179.00 
2525 22DT. Jigged grey bone handles. $ 149.00 




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Congress: 2 sheepfoot, 1 pen, 1 cop 

Closed length: 3 1/4". (not shown) 



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5464 22DT. Jigged grey bone handles. $ 15 



- - Boker USA, INC. • 1 550 Balsam Street • Lakewood, CO 802 1 4 - 59 1 7 

HOICER Phone 1-303.462.0662 • Fax 1.303 462.0668 • Monday-Friday 8:00 am -4:30 pm |MST| 

BAUMWERK - SOLINGEN Email: sales@bokerusa.com • Website: www.bokerusa.com 



'<<. 



l^g^^r 3 ©^^ 



The 



By B.R. Hughes 
BLADE® field editor 



One-Man 

Knife Show 

Is "ring master 
"one-ring circus" die sign of 
things to come? 




V 



An example of Jerry Fisk's latest work is 
this 17 1/2-inch stag bowie in damascus. 
The engraving is by the maker. 
(Point Seven photo) 



20 / BLADE 



blademag.cqm 

•S - 



MARCH 2006 



ABS master smith Jerry Fisk fulfilled 
a long-time dream this past Oct. 15- 
16 when he staged a one-man knife 
show in his shop near the town of 
Nashville in the foothills of Arkansas. 

To the best of my knowledge, Jerry had 
been talking about such an undertaking for 
at least three years, and he had a few con- 
cerns about the venture's feasibility. He need 
not have worried, though, because the event 
was a fantastic success, with all concerned 
looking forward to his follow-up "one-ring 
circus" in 2006. 

Due to the space limitations of his shop, 
Jerry determined that attendance would have 
to be limited. Consequently, he curtailed the 
number of participants to "admission by in- 
vitation only," plus a very few of his friends 
who would play active roles in the show. Thus 
it was that 18 of Jerry's regular clients showed 
up on the morning of Oct. 15, together with 
ABS bladesmiths J.R. Cook and Bert Gatlin, 




Onion 

Asians 

with SpeedSafe® 



Damascus, stag, an engraved guard 
and fancy pins highlight Jerry's drop- 
point hunter. (Point Seven photo) 




RAINBOW CHIVE 

Model 1600VIB 

MSRP $77.95 

Steel .420HC stainless-steel 

titanium-oxide 

coated 
Handle...410 stainless-steel 

titanium-oxide 

coated 
Blade.....! 15/16 in. 

(4.9 cm) 
Closed...2 7/8 in. 

(7.3 cm) 
Weight.J.9 oz. 
Includes gift tin 






Blade Magazine 

Overall Knife of 

the Year 



RAINBOW LEEK 

Model 1660VIB 

MSRP $99.95 

Steel .440A stainless-steel 

titanium-oxide coated 

Handle...410 stainless-steel 
titanium-oxide coated 

Blade 3 in. (7.5 cm) 

Closed...4 in. (10.3 cm) 

Weight...3.1 oz. 

ides soft zipper case 



Patented 

Assisted-Openincf 

System 




- 4A 
MARCH 2006 






k«»l\OkW 

k n i vm E S 



For information or a dealer near you, call: 1-800-325-2891 
www.kershawknives.com 

Kershaw Ken Onion knives are covered by US Patent Numbers: 
5,802.722 ■ 6,145,202 • 6,338,431 ■ 6.397,476 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 21 



LERS 



0N L.Y PLEAS E:! 



- 

ANT 



mtm 

Am 



oteng 




12220 Parkway Ctr. Dr., Poway, CA 92064 
PH: (800) 367-5900 OR (858) 715-2500 
Fax: (800) 367-5903 OR (858) 715-2525 

E-MAIL: INFO@MOTENG.COM 

WWW.MOTENG.COM 







/ A 



y 



In one of the show's knifemaking dem- 
onstrations, Jerry pounds a hot billet 
under the air hammer. (Hughes photo) 



knife purveyor Bob Neal, sheathmaker Ken- 
ny Rowe, and yours truly, along with Jerry's 
secretary, Mildred Webb, and her 9-year old 
daughter Hope, who was to play a very im- 
portant role during the weekend. 

Step Right Up! 

The show kicked off Saturday morning with 
a presentation by Neal, who is a familiar 
face at most major knife shows. Bob talked 
knowledgeably concerning the various styles 
of handmade knives and materials, and pro- 
vided insight on assembling a meaningful 
collection. Later, 1 presented some tips on 
what to look for when considering the pur- 
chase of any handmade knife. 

The two guest bladesmiths, Cook and 
Gatlin, were chosen by the attendees, and 
Fisk emphasized that they were selected as 




much for their ethical business practices as 
for their impressive knifemaking skills. Each 
brought several knives for sale and all sold 
very quickly. 

As the day progressed, Cook, Gatlin 
and Fisk conducted forging demonstrations, 
lectures on making sound purchases in the 
world of cutlery were provided, and all en- 
joyed plenty of good food and music. 

Fisk, the only knifemaker ever to be 
named a National Living Treasure in the 
USA, has worked with a number of inter- 
national makers in Russia, Brazil and else- 
where, and has won many awards for his 
work, examples of which have been dis- 
played by the University of Arkansas art 
department. He has several years of orders 
backlogged, so his one-man show repre- 
sented a rare opportunity for a few of his 




22 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



many fans to obtain "instant gratification" 
in the form of a Fisk knife. 

He had 12 knives and one tomahawk for 
sale at the one-man show. Each attendee was 
allowed to write his name on as many as three 
slips of paper, which the attendee placed in 
the glass jars situated next to the knives of his 
choice — one jar per knife/tomahawk. One 
knife, a handsome hunter, was priced at $8, 
the amount Jerry received for the first knife 
he sold over 25 years ago. Rest assured, each 
attendee had his name in the jar for it. 

Remember 9-year-old Hope Webb? 
She drew a name from each jar, and the 
person whose name was drawn had the 
option of buying the accompanying 
knife. Most jumped at the first opportu- 
nity, since there was a limit of one Fisk- 
knife purchase per attendee. 

Fisk Fans 

1 managed to talk with two of those in at- 
tendance, curious to see what exactly had 
drawn them to the event. One was James 
Treacy, a union pipe fitter form Brookline, 
New Hampshire, who became interested in 
handmade cutlery when he met bladesmith 
Wayne Valachovic, who then lived in New 
Hampshire, about 15 years ago. 

"I was primarily interested in folders," 
James told me, "but then I started buying 
fixed-blade knives. The first I ever pur- 
chased was a Moran. Then, about 10 years 
ago, I bought a Fisk hunter and I really liked 
it. I was impressed with the total package. It 
smacked of fine workmanship, and it felt very 
good in my hand. Since then, I've bought a 
number of Fisk knives. 

"I think this 'one-man-show' concept is 
a terrific idea, and we have an opportunity 
to buy one of his knives right off the table. If 
Jerry has another one of these, I'll be back!" 

Another of the attendees was Tim Wal- 
lace of Dallas, Texas. He is the chief executive 
officer of Trinity Industries, the largest man- 
ufacturer of railway cars and related items in 
the USA. Tim began collecting Remington 
Bullet knives about 15 years ago, and later 
met Fisk through a friend. He claimed that 
he has the largest collection of Fisk knives in 
the world today. 

"Jerry's personality is what originally at- 
tracted me to his [knives] and, of course, he 
does very remarkable work. Certainly, if he 
elects to have another one-man show, I'll be 
here," Tim paused, before adding. "Come to 
think of it, Jerry is a one-man show!" 

Not everyone left with a Fisk knife, but 
all seemed pleased to have attended what 
was in reality a "one-man hammer-in and a 
one-man show" — all rolled into one memo- 
rable weekend. 

For more information contact Jerry Fisk, 
Dept. BL3, 10095 Hwy. 278 W, Nashville, AR 
71852 870.845.4456 Jfisk@alltel.net, fisk- 
knives.com. 




CONTINUING THE QUES 
BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS AND 
INCOMPARABLE QUALITY 



Adam Fox 
Carmel, Cat 
(331)624-52 

Advance Cutlery 

5 stores in So. California 
(626) 445-6066 

American Flags & Cutlery 
Ventura, CA 
(305) 641-1941 

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BLADE / 23 



swords 



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As its name implies, the two-hand 
sword is designed large enough to 
easily accommodate both hands. The 
classical Highland claymore has a 
down-sloping guard that ends in 
quatrefoils, as seen here on the model 
SH2060N Claymore from CAS/Hanwei. 
Blade steel: 1065 carbon. Blade length: 
41 inches. Hilt: leather. Overall weight: 
4 pounds, 14 ounces. Overall length: 
54 3/4 inches. MSRP: $285. 



24 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



rj^Are 

Hands 

Better Than 




IN PART ONE OF TWO, THE AUTHOR 

EXAMINES THE DEVELOPMENT AND HISTORY 

OF THE EUROPEAN TWO-HAND SWORD 

By Hank Reinhardt 
BLADE® field editor 



In many of today's action films that deal 
with swords, the combatants often are 
shown using their weapons — excluding 
the rapier — with two hands. This is fine 
depending on the country and period, as 
for instance the Japanese katana at all 
times or the larger European versions 
between the 14th- 17th centuries. 

However, this much-used cinematic 
device gives a skewed version of history, 
as both the sword and shield were the 
preferred weapons for the most part when 
swords were used in battle. Nonetheless, 
the device is readily understandable when 
you realize the difficulties in choreograph- 
ing a fight with sword and shield. And, 
let's face it, two-handers just look impres- 
sive. 

Which brings us to the subject at hand, 
that is, just how popular were two-hand 
swords, when did they start seeing use and 
how effective were they? 

In the case of Europe, no one is able to 
say for sure just how early the two-hand 
sword was employed. It seems only logical 
that when a soldier lost his shield in battle, 
he would continue to fight using both 
hands on the sword. Given the wide range 
of individual tastes, I feel certain that there 
were very few combatants who actually 



preferred a two-hand sword to a sword and 
shield. 

On the other hand, these early (well 
before the 14th century) swords appear to 
have been merely outsized versions of the 
standard swords of the various periods. 
Rather than two-hand swords, they are 
called bastard swords or swords of war. 
They could be swung with one hand but 
had space in the grip for an additional 
hand should the user feel it was needed. 

Though the two-hand sword had not 
gained any great popularity, there were still 
very large two-handers in existence. For 
instance, one is in the Glenbow Museum in 
Calgary, Alberta, Canada. It is a huge 
sword, well over 6 feet long, and weighs 
about 12 pounds. It dates from the 13th 
century and I would consider it an impor- 
tant sword, the only one of its kind; alas, 
no pictures of it are available. 

Developmental Factors 

Two factors brought about the development 
of the true two-hand sword in the 14th 
century. One was the improvement of 
armor. As mail was superseded by plate 
armor, the sword became less and less 
effective. When an infantryman was forced 
to face a fully armored knight, a two-hand 




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26 /BLADE 



swords 

swords 



crushing or cutting weapon was needed — a 
halberd, bill or a two-hand sword. This was 
also true for the fully armored knight when 
fighting afoot. For the armored man with 
no need for a shield, a two-hand weapon 
was the most practical. While a staff 
weapon was impractical to carry on horse- 
back, a two-hand sword could easily be 
strapped to the saddle. All of these 
weapons could deliver tremendous blows 
capable of crushing armor. 

The second factor was the development 
of new tactics and a new appreciation for 
infantry. The Scot's Schiltroon and the 
Swiss pike phalanx both used the long, 12- 
16-foot pike as the major weapon. The 




pike stopped the charge of the knights 
cold. Demoralized and confused as a 
result, the knights were relatively easy prey 
for men armed with shorter, crushing 
weapons. 

When pike formation fought pike 
formation, the two-hand sword was used to 
break the pikes of the opposing force, thus 
necessitating a redesign in the two-hand 
sword. Whereas the knightly fighting 
weapon was a big sword but shaped much 
the same as the smaller version, the new 
weapon was different. The guards were 
quite large, sometimes as wide as 16 
inches, often with steel rings on both sides 
as additional protection for the hand. 

The most unusual feature was the 
added parrying hooks that projected out 
from the blade about 1 foot or so below the 
guard. The hooks not only provided addi- 
tional resistance from a blade cutting down 
the sword, but also were the main protec- 
tion for the hand when the sword was 
shortened — a favorite tactic when the 
fighting got to close quarters. The hand 
could be shifted to the unsharpened 
portion of the blade below the guard, 
called the ricasso, and thus the sword 
could be used for short cuts and as a short 
spear. 



"The two-hand 

sword was used 

to break the 

pikes of the 

opposing force." 

— the author 



It was quite an impressive sword, and 
very popular with the Swiss and their arch 
foes, the German Landsknechts. The 
swords quickly spread throughout Europe 
and also became a favorite dueling 
weapon, and whole schools developed on 
the use of the two-hand sword in duels. 

Another popular development was the 
flamberge blade. The "flame" blade is 
made in a series of curves, and the curve 
varies from sword to sword. It was thought 
at the time that a curved edge inflicted a 
more severe wound, so many of these 
swords were made with wavy blades. 
(Many people realized that the so-called 
cutting prowess of the curved edge/wavy 
blade was just another urban legend, but it 

This is an illustration of one of the 
largest and earliest two-hand swords 
known. It is in superb condition and was 
described by Claude Blair, curator emer- 
itus of the Tower Armories in London, as 
"a very important sword." (Peter Fuller 
illustration) 

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did look good.) 

Combatants who carried two-hand 
swords in war were called "double-pay" 
soldiers. They were invariably big, strong, 
tough types. Though the swords are not as 
heavy as they look — most weigh between 
6-8 1/2 pounds — they still required strong 
men to swing and control them for long 
periods of time. 

During the engagements of the pikes, it 
was the job of the double-pay soldiers to 
rush between the lines of pikemen and, 
when they reached the front, to swing their 
swords and smash the pikes of the oppos- 
ing line. They almost never sheared the 
tough oak or ash staffs, but they could 
splinter and break them. Once the shaft 
splintered, then the point of the pike 
became useless. 

Of course, you can imagine what 
happened when the Landsknechts sent 
their double-pay soldiers forward at the 
same time that the Swiss sent theirs! A 
brutal battle royal between the two double- 
pay units ensued, huge swords flailing 
about, blood and limbs all over the place — 
not the clean puncture wound of a pike, but 
a ghastly harvest of body parts, blood and 
brains. But then, such combat has never 
been pretty. Union Gen. William Sherman 
put it best when he said, "War is hell!" 



Bearing Swords 

There was another development of the two- 
hand sword that really had nothing to do 
with war, and that was the rise in popular- 
ity of the bearing sword. Bearing swords 
are often confused with fighting weapons, 
and, since they can weigh up to 15 pounds, 
have given rise to the fiction that two-hand 
swords were very heavy. 

Another popular development was the 
flamberge blade. The "flame" blade is 
made in a series of curves, and the 
curve varies from sword to sword. A 
misconception of the time was that a 
curved edge inflicted a more severe 
wound, so many of the swords were 
made with wavy blades. Museum Repli- 
cas' reproduction is 46 inches long over- 
all. MSRP: $275. 





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swords 

swords 



Bearing swords are huge, with some 
exceeding 6 feet in length. However, they 
are processional swords, used only to 
impress the populace during parades, gath- 
erings, civic investments and, at times, to 
surround a person of high nobility. They 
were never meant to be used in battle, and 
frequently are not tempered. 

There is an easy way to tell if a sword 
was intended for use in battle. When you 
pick it up and think that if you were in 
shape to swing it it would make a nice 
weapon, then it was a weapon. Conversely, 
if you pick it up and wonder about some- 
one so strong as to actually be able to use 
it, then it was never intended for use in 
battle. Another way: If the sword is 
inscribed and the inscription can only be 
read if the blade is held point up, then it is 
a bearing sword. 



"One of the most 

impressive and 

romantic of the 

two-hand swords 

is the Scottish 

claymore." 

— the author 



Claymores 

One of the most impressive and romantic 
of the two-hand swords is the Scottish 
claymore. (Curiously, the Scots called both 
the basket hilt and the two-hander "clay- 
mores.") 

There were two varieties of two-hand 
claymores. One is the Lowland claymore, 
which is actually nothing more than the 
standard two-hand sword, long blade, long 
grip and long, straight cross guard, often 
with ring guards as well. The classical 
Highland claymore, on the other hand, is 
quite distinct. It has down-sloping guards 
that end in quatrefoils. This seems to be 
typical of the Highlands, as older one-hand 
swords also have the down-sloping guard. 
The pommel was frequently just a round 
ball. 

The claymore has the distinction of 
being the one two-hand sword that was 
actually carried in a scabbard and worn on 
the back. Of course, it is impossible to 
draw the sword when carried thus, so the 
scabbard was slipped over the back and the 
sword was drawn and the scabbard left to 



28 /BLADE 



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MARCH 2006 




The CAS Logo, CAS na 
AS Iberia, Inc. and cannot 



urging Steel, Making History' marks are property of 
fiout written permission. © & ® 2003-2006 CAS Iberia, Inc. 



swords 

swords 



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Fax: (276) 783-9298 

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lie. If the owner survived he could always 
find the scabbard, but if not, what did it 
matter? 

A note of warning about the large clay- 
more: It was romanticized in the 19th 
century. Consequently, there were a large 
number of Victorian copies made. Now 



tened oval in cross section, and never had 
fullers. Neither was the blade ever made 
with a point; instead, it was cut straight 
across. Often, three holes were drilled 
close to the end so that the sword could 
never be made into a fighting weapon. 
Examples are frequently engraved with 
gallows and wheels, and words like 
"justice" and "mercy." 

Execution by sword was favored on the 
continent, with the condemned having to 



Another feature of the Highland 
claymore was a round ball for 
the pommel. The ring-pommel 
claymore from Pro Cut features 
a 32.75-inch blade of hand- 
forged carbon steel. Weight: 7 
pounds. Overall length: 45.75 
inches. MSRP: $220. 




that many years have passed, it is difficult 
to tell which are the originals and which 
are Victorian copies. I doubt there are 
more than two-dozen originals in exis- 
tence, though there are large numbers of 
copies. 

Executioner's Sword 

There is another two-hand sword that was 
used a great deal in Europe, and it has a 
less than savory reputation — the execu- 
tioner's sword. It had a blade roughly 30 
inches long and was wide, usually about 2 
1/2 inches. The blade was flat or a flat- 



kneel upright and hold his/her head up. 
Anne Boleyn requested a headsman from 
Europe when Henry VIII had her executed. 
They never heard a complaint from her! 

Next time, in the conclusion: two-hand 
swords of the East. 

For the contact information for the swords 
pictured, see "Where To Get 'Em " on page 
98. 



30 /BLADE 



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MARCH 2006 



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The frame is titanium anodized a 
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each (sold in a limited number of 
10). (Point Seven photo) 



32 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




f hen the futuristic Snap Lock folder 
burst on the scene in 2002, it was 
not that the concept was completely 
new. It had been updated, tweaked 
and revised with input from several 
people. 

Ed VanHoy was instrumental in build- 
ing the knife, which won several handmade 
awards — including Most Innovative Hand- 
made Design at the 2002 BLADE Show and 
the A.G. Russell Most Innovative Folding 
Knife at the 2002 Guild Show. Two years 
later, the Columbia River Knife & Tool 
(CRKT) factory/custom collaboration ver- 
sion of the knife was the Blade Magazine 
2004 Overall Knife of the Year®. 

Through it all, Ed gives credit where it 
is due. 

"The idea for an out-the-side knife has 
been around for a long time, and there were 
probably five or six people involved in this 
knife becoming what it is today," he ac- 
knowledged. 

Among the collaborators was Tom Hitch- 
cock of Hitchcock Designs. 

"Tom showed me something he had that 
was a very rough version of an out-the-side 
knife," Ed remembered, "and the two of us 
designed it together, patented it together, and 
are co-owners of the patent. Tom was instru- 
mental in the development of the knife, and 
Hal Broerman and Derrick Landrum were 
very helpful in design work and in physically 




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Steel .440A stainless-steel 

BABY BOA w '" 1 ^ p '' 5 ' 1 ' msn 

Handle...6061-T6 anodized aluminum 
Model 1585BR with smoked finish 

MSRP $74.95 Blade 2 in. (5.1 cm) 

Closed...2 3/4 in. (7.0 cm) 
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For information or a dealer near you, call • 1-800-325-2891 • www.kershawknives.com 

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MARCH 2006 



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BLADE / 33 



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Yoshindo Yoshihara (Japan) 



h^iro^qQ© ddi] ©(feoD 

profile in steel 

working on several of the prototypes." 

Shortly after the debut of the handmade 
version of the Snap Lock, the innovators 
were approached by CRKT, and the result 
was a licensing agreement that made the 
design available on a mass-production basis. 
According to Ed, a look that blends old and 
new has been part of the knife's allure. 

"The Snap Lock is an unusual knife 
because of its overall appearance," he com- 
mented. "It has very fluid lines and a hi-tech 
look to it. Its functionality makes it a very 
nice tool, and it blends a modern and medi- 
eval look. Overall, people like it because they 
are intrigued with the way it opens. It won 
those awards because it was something no- 
body had ever seen, although there have been 
other out-the-side knives." 

Another product in the CRKT line is the 
Snap Fire, which appeared in 2004 to excel- 
lent reviews. The Snap Fire incorporates a 
somewhat different locking mechanism than 
the original Snap Lock. The Snap Lock de- 
sign employs a cam that actually splays the 
frame apart to lock the blade in position, 
while the Snap Fire uses a spring-and-wheel 
arrangement to assist with opening and forc- 
ing the blade into the locking position. Like 
its older cousin, the Snap Fire also was hon- 
ored, receiving acclaim as the Blade Maga- 
zine 2005 Imported Knife of the Year®. 

A couple of new VanHoy designs, the 
Gemini and Gemini II, are set for introduc- 
tion by CRKT in the near future. Both are 
constructed of damascus steel and titanium 
frames. "The Gemini is a one-sided knife 
that's along the same lines as many of the 
one-sided knives out there today," Ed re- 
marked. "The difference is that it uses a pin 
lock and has a button that unlocks the pin. 
The Gemini II is locked and unlocked with 
a button that's actually on the blade, allow- 
ing the knife to be opened and closed in the 
locked position. It also has a safety." 

Before he gained a measure of fame with 
the Snap Lock, Ed was fashioning quality 
handmade knives, mainly fixed blades with 
a few folders in the mix. His most frequent 
creation is a drop-point hunter with a 4-inch 
damascus blade and a handle of desert iron- 
wood or mammoth ivory. His most request- 
ed folder is a locking liner with a 2 1/2-inch 
blade and bolsters of damascus, and a handle 
of mammoth ivory or mother-of-pearl. The 
average prices for Ed's knives run $400-$450 
for hunters, $700-$ 1,000 on large daggers or 
fighters, and $500-$650 for folders. 

Another of Ed's innovative designs is 
the I.B.A.TS. (Integrated Blade And Tool 
System). His two-bladed folder sporting the 
system, the Nautilus, won Most Innovative 
Design in the handmade competition at the 
2005 BLADE Show. It has an all-titanium 
frame and damascus blade and overlays. Ed's 
list price: $2,000. He said CRKT is currently 
reviewing it for a possible factory/custom 



34 / BLADE 



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MARCH 2006 




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A number of years ago, Ed, his father-in-law, Danny 

McManus, and Mike Norris formed a partnership ^S 

called Stamascus. While Mike is no longer a _^p 

partner, Ed forges high carbon damascus 

and Mike still supplies the stainless da-* 

mascus, such as on these folders irtjd" 

ancient ivory and wood. Ed sells j£Jm 

the steel under the North Fork y/ ftf/Sft 

River Forge name, and his 

knives under the Stamas- j[ 

cus and VanHoy Cus- ..A 

torn Knives and Metal ^i* 

Engraving trade ,4M 

names. (Point ^3 

Seven photo) ^m 




collaboration as well. 

Ed's knifemaking career goes back three 
decades. "1 started making knives in 1975 
and have been full time for 10 years now," 
he related. "My wife, Tanya, and I are both 
metal engravers. We have been doing that 
for eight years and provide that service on 
commission. There have been times at knife 
shows that we have stayed up all night to get 
engraving work done for knifemakers." 

While Tanya spends her creative en- 
ergy mainly on engraving, Ed continues to 
concentrate on handmade knives and the 
production of high-quality damascus steel, 
another of his industry-related activities. A 
number of years ago, Ed, his father-in-law, 
Danny McManus, and Mike Norris formed a 
partnership called Stamascus. 

"Mike and I are close friends, and he had 
started making stainless damascus steel," Ed 
recalled. "We were neighbors in North Car- 
olina and got together when we decided to 
form a company, with Mike making the steel 
and me making the knives. Now, Mike is no 
longer a partner, and I forge high carbon da- 
mascus and he still supplies stainless damas- 
cus. We sell the steel under the North Fork 



River Forge name, and sell knives under the 
Stamascus and VanHoy Custom Knives and 
Metal Engraving trade names." 

According to Ed, the number of layers in 
his damascus is dictated by the pattern being 
fabricated. The layer count can run from 100 
to 1,000 per billet, and a number of different 
patterns are available, including a new one 
called zebra and others such as raindrop, lad- 
der, diagonal ladder, random, and broad lad- 
der. His experimentation with new patterns 
is ongoing. 

When Ed started making knives, a 
how-to book written by Blade Magazine 
Cutlery Hall-Of-Famer© Ken Warner in- 
spired him. As a teenager, Ed visited the 
Acorn Knife Shop in Gatlinburg, Tennes- 
see, and viewed some quality handmade 
pieces. Soon, he discovered that a number 
of accomplished knifemakers lived nearby. 
Harold Corby was in Johnson City, Ten- 
nessee, while Gray Taylor was in King- 
sport and Bob Connelly was in Jonesbor- 
ough. Larry Harley and his dad, Pat, were 
making knives in Bristol. Ed also visited 
Cutlery Hall-Of-Famer George Herron's 
shop in South Carolina. 



36 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



"Harold gave me a lot of information 
and helped me along," Ed said. "With- 
out much equipment, the toughest thing 
to understand was how to make a blade. 
My first blades were very crude, heated 
in a coal furnace, and beaten down to the 
best of my ability. Some of them were 
old files. 1 had an old Sears 3x8-inch belt 
sander. I would fasten the blades down 
to a board and use that to take most of 
the roughness out, and then finish them 
down by hand." 

When not making knives, Ed works the 
damascus forge and fills orders for stainless 
damascus blades sold by Texas Knifemakers 
Supply. He also has designed several knife 
kits that he said have sold well. He annually 
attends shows in Paris, France, and Oslo, 
Norway, as well as in the USA. 

Some time back, Ed made himself a 
promise. "When we started the Snap Lock 



thing, I said that I wanted to make six knives 
and win six awards for most innovative de- 
sign. That's a lofty goal," he smiled, "but I'm 
three-for-three so far." 



Ed VanHoy 
Dept. BL3, 

24255 N. Fork River Rd. 

Abingdon, VA 24210 

276.944.4885 

stamascus @ direcway.com 

stamascusknifeworks.com or 

stamascus.com 



Specialties Folders, including those 
with unusual mechanisms, and 
straight knives 

Steels ATS-34, CPM S60V and D- 
2; damascus in a variety of patterns; 
stainless damascus by Mike Norris 
Handles Mammoth ivory, mother- 
of-pearl, abalone, desert ironwood, 
titanium, stag and others 
Miscellaneous Offers filework, en- 
graving, acid etching, mosaic pins, 
decorative bolsters and custom-fit- 
ted sheaths of English bridle leather; 
purveyor Jerry Schroeder is also a 
source for Ed's knives 
List Price Range $250-$3,000 




HlQhE>ppF>cl Tools. F-or 
Hardcore 1 Individuals* 



® 



J 



<&} 



M 






«1 



(•) 



a 



Stamascus steel, 
engraving and ebony, 
ivory and stag handle: 
accentuate this array 
of Ed's fixed blades. 
(Point Seven photo) 



www.stnderknives.com 

visit our forum : www. badla n d sforums. com 



ayout O2U05 SnelOv Cnan 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 37 




spec sheet 



By MSG Kim Breed 
5th Special Forces (retired) 



Honey of a Subhilt 

Bill Johnson's fighter is a heavy-duty performer 
that handles light duty as well 



One of the best things about going 
to knife shows is meeting other 
knifemakers. During a recent Ohio 
knife show, I visited with other makers the 
last day of the show while my partner, Gary 
Wheeler, manned our exhibitor table. 

There were some known and unknown 
makers displaying their knives. On the 
last aisle I saw something that caught my 
eye — a set of subhilt fighters by William 
C. "Bill" Johnson with bead-blasted 
blades ranging from 6-8 inches. Sporting 
Micarta® handles, the knives were nice 
and clean, simple yet very functional, the 
kind you can beat up and not have to worry 
about scratching the finish. 




Standing the 1x3 pine slat on end, the 
author used the subhilt like a hatchet to 
make kindling. It penetrated the wood 
halfway through and all he had to do 
was twist the blade to separate the slat 
the rest of the way. 

38 / BLADE 



I waited patiently to introduce myself ! "Spec She 



while Bill, a 27-year U.S. Air Force veteran, 
finished his conversation. He knew me from 



The subhilt made clean 
cuts with no tear outs. The 
blade's full belly pulled the 
edge through the paper 
with ease. 



Bill Johnson's 
subhilt fighter 
sports a 6-inch 
blade of 440C 
stainless with 
an extended 
false edge. 
The handle 
is canvas 
Micarta® and 
the fittings are 
stainless. His 
list price: $275. 







in BLADE® 
arranged t 
pick up his 6- 
inch subhilt 
after the 
show. £ 
That 
after- 

noon Bill 

dropped 

it off at 

my table. We talked 

awhile and he told 

me he had been a 

member of The 

Knifemakers ' 

Guild since 1982. 

One look at the grind lines 

on his knives and you can 

see the experience of the 

man who applied them. I had 

a new knife to play with on the 

way home to Tennessee. 

Sharpness Test 

The first thing I did was test the 
blade's sharpness. I used standard copy 
paper and a heavier, hot-pink card stock 
(it is my daughter Kayla's paper, not 
mine). The subhilt made clean cuts with 
no tear outs. The blade's full belly really 
pulled the edge through the paper. The 
choil worked excellent in controlling the 
knife on such light work. You just have to be 
careful when choking up on the blade via the 
choil as the start of the cutting edge is right 
by your finger. Do not let your index finger 
get loose! Next, I sliced up two cardboard 
boxes. The fighter ate through them fast 
with no challenges whatsoever. 

Bill's knife is made for heavy-duty use, 
so I gave it the penetration test. The standard 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



SPEC CHART 



Knife Subhilt fighter 

Maker William C. "Bill" Johnson 

Blade Steel 440C stainless 

Blade Length 6" 

Grind Hollow 

Finish Bead blasted 

Handle Canvas Micarta® 

Fittings Stainless 

Overall Length ~11" 

Sheath Leather 

Maker's List Price $275 



fencing and reverse grips work well with a 
subhilt knife. However, when using the ice- 
pick grip, the edge has to face away from 
you, otherwise the second single guard of 
the subhilt will dig into your palm. 

The phone book was the first penetra- 
tion-test medium. I stabbed it four times. 
The false edge on the wide tip made penetra- 
tion easy. Then I grabbed a piece of 1 -inch- 
thick pine and, employing a minimum of 
power, drove the point all the way through it. 
If it were my knife I would sharpen the false 
edge to allow the point to cut on each side 
as it penetrates. (Of course, a double-edge 
knife may be illegal in your area, so check 
your local and state laws before modifying 
any knife in such a manner.) 

I had some lx3-inch pine slats left over 
from my last home improvement and the 
subhilt bit deep into them, sending splin- 
ters flying all over my garage floor. Next, 
standing a slat on its end, I used the subhilt 
like a hatchet to make kindling. It pene- 
trated the wood halfway through and all I 
had to do was twist the blade to separate 
the slat the rest of the way. 




Though he does not recommend such 
use, the author worked the knife like a 
pry bar, stabbing and twisting it to open 
the crate. The blade showed no signs of 
stressing/cracking and was still sharp 
afterward. 



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Mail: christine@simonichknives.com 



spec .sheet 

spec sheet 



I saved the best for last — a 4x4 wooden 
shipping crate that needed opening. I do 
not recommend prying with a knife but 
"Spec Sheet" is a test to see just how far 
a knife can go. I inserted the blade tip in 
the crack in the crate's boards and drove 
it home using the palm of my hand. Very 
slowly I applied sideward pressure to the 
blade, working it back and forth, to open 
the crack so I could get more of the blade 
into it. As the wood started to move, I 
worked my way down to the bottom of the 
crate and pop, the side plate was loose. 

While prying, I watched the blade flex 
and decided that if it had not snapped by 
then, it would be OK. I worked the knife like 
a pry bar, stabbing and twisting. It showed 
no signs of stressing/cracking and was still 
sharp afterward. Again, I do not recommend 
using a knife as a pry bar as it might consti- 
tute abuse and void the maker's warranty. 

Recommendations 

I would angle the edge away from the choil 
a little. This can be done through standard 
sharpening. Just roll the point over. 

Final Grade 

The overall design and function make Bill's 
subhilt one I actually like. The balance is 
great and I did not find any sharp spots on the 
handle. It is definitely a high-quality fighter. 

For more information contact William C. 
"Bill" Johnson, Dept. BL3, 225 Fairfield 
Pike, Enon, OH 45323 937.864.7802 www. 
WCJohnsonknives.com. 



Blade 




Employing a minimum of power, the 
author drove the subhilt's point all the 
way through the 1-inch-thick pine. 



40 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



The Busse Combat 



III 

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Many finish options are available. 



The Hell Razor features our new patent pending "Corrugated Bevel 
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© 2005 Busse Combat Knife Company. ALl rights reserved. 



hot locks 




By Anthony Lombardo 






The Stud Lock on the Kershaw Spec-Bump ($199.95 MSRP) uses 
an extremely simple concept of a faceted, ambidextrous, spring- 
loaded cross bolt mounted inside the blade that bears against 
the dual, hardened stainless steel liners when in use. A simple 
push forward on the cross bolt and the lock deactivates. 



42 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




The new Auto-LAWKS safety from Columbia River Knife & Tool 
engages automatically when the blade opens — which, incidentally, is 
lightning fast due to the large, grooved flipper that Kit Carson 
designed, in this case for the CRKT M21-14SF. The auto-safety makes 
lock failure an extremely remote possibility. In fact, in his testing, the 
author termed it more an impossibility. 



The knife industry has been over- 
whelmed with new locking mecha- 
nisms over the past decade. Some 
of the designs have been innovative and 
well engineered, while others never quite 
made it off the ground. Here is a look at a 
few of the ways some 
of the best cutlery 
manufacturers are 
ensuring that your 
folder stays open 
when you want it to. 



Auto-LAWKS 

Columbia River Knife 
& Tool (CRKT) has 
been one of the great 
innovators of the blade trade in recent years. 
The company effectively harnesses premier 
designs from some of the industry's most 
talented custom makers, and has the resulting 
knives fabricated in cutting-edge factories all 
over the world at affordable prices and excel- 
lent quality. 

In response to the needs of hard users, 
CRKT has developed the new Auto- 
LAWKS. LAWKS is the acronym for Lake 
and Walker Safety — designed by Blade 
Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Famers© Ron 
Lake and Michael Walker — that has been 



"The Stud Lock 

would not fail after 

repeated 'spine 

whacking."' 

— the author 



successfully used on CRKT locking-liner 
designs to prevent accidental lock failure. 
The design works very well and, on the 
new M21-14SF, designed by Kit Carson, 
CRKT has taken the concept a step further. 
In the standard LAWKS-equipped 
knives, the thumb 
safety is engaged 
manually at the user's 
discretion only. On 
the new Auto- 
LAWKS model, the 
safety engages auto- 
matically when the 
blade opens — which, 
incidentally, is light- 
ning fast due to the 
large, grooved flipper that Kit designed for 
the knife. The auto-safety makes lock fail- 
ure an extremely remote possibility. In 
fact, in my testing, it is more an impossi- 
bility. 

The Auto-LAWKS is easy to disengage 
and can be done with one hand, even 
though the blade liner and LAWKS switch 
must be disengaged at the same time. 
Despite the fact that 1 cannot think and 
chew gum simultaneously, the Auto- 
LAWKS' operation is easy and fluid for 
even my fumble fingers. 



tj\ St 2 3 



'fer 



' fL \ 

\ js-8 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 43 




ATTENTION Knife Makers & Manufacturers 



Does your Stag look 



this? 



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hot locks 



Look for this winning development on 
more of CRKT's heavy-duty tactical line. 

Stud Lock 

Fueled by the superlative and sleek designs 
of custom knifemaker Ken Onion, 
Kershaw has switched gears and developed 
some entirely new locking mechanisms. 

The Onion-designed Spec-Bump is 
what you get when you combine world- 
class engineering, Kershaw's patented 
SpeedSafe assisted-opening technology 
and Onion — arguably the top tactical knife 
designer in the world. The Spec-Bump is 
sexy decked out in a satin-black, 3D- 
machined G-10 handle and Tungsten DLC- 
coated CPM 154 blade, and has the usual 
SpeedSafe opening system that Kershaw 
has made so wildly popular. 

Where this knife departs from the 
norm is the new stud-lock system. The 
lock uses an extremely simple concept of a 
faceted, ambidextrous, spring-loaded cross 
bolt mounted inside the blade that bears 
against the dual, hardened stainless steel 
liners when in use. A simple push forward 
on the cross bolt and the lock deactivates. 
Simple as pie and smooth as butter! 

According to Kershaw, the lock is 
incredibly strong, even though it is 



^ROTEGK 

Proudly Made in the USA 

Revolutionary New Pin Lock 

Ultra Safety Mechanism 

A Blackie Collins Collaboration 



Superior Spring Action 

Spring Assist P.L.U.S. Mechanism 

www.protechknives.com 





Push 






SAFE POSITION 

In- this position with the button 

end of the knife pointed down 

towards the ground - 

Tha knife can not be opened.. 

When you are ready to open the 

knife, remove the additional safety 

and rotate the Knife to position #2. 



OPENING POSITION 

Now the knife sits in your hand 
with the button end up. Simply 
push the flat section of the blade 
in towards the handle and "slip" 
your finger out of the way. 
The blade will snap open with 
the famous Pro-tech 
coil spring action. 



. UNLOCK* CLOSE 
When you are ready to close the knife - 

be sure it is in the button up position 

as shown. 

Press the button to unlock the blade. 

fold the blade closed completely 

into the handle. 

Keep pressure on the blade and hold it 

in the closed position and rotate. 



4, ROTATE BACK TO 
SAFE POSITION 

The pin will fair back into place, 
locking the blade into position. 
Be sure to put the extra safety 
in (he ON position 

Pro-Tech Knives, LLC 

Santa Fe Springs, California 

{562)903-0678 



44 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



A pivoting toggle on the butt of the 
Kershaw E.T.'s handle 
locks/unlocks and opens/closes 
the blade. Push the pivoting shoe, 
here done with the left hand, and 
you can manipulate the blade 
almost magically open and closed, 
fast or slow — all safely and 
securely. (The knife is operated 
with two hands here for illustrative 
purposes only.) 




powered by just one small coil spring. In 
addition, the lock easily disassembles for 
maintenance purposes. When I tested it, 
the lock would not fail after repeated 
"spine whacking" on a pine board. In 
fact, the position of the blade studs makes 
accidental unlocking very unlikely in 
various grips. I feel that this lock is the 
ultimate refinement of the SpeedSafe 
design and complements the Spec- 
Bump's hi-tech, racy look quite well. 

External Toggle 

And now for something completely 
different: the Kershaw E.T., the Blade 



Magazine 2005 Most Innovative Ameri- 
can Design®. Devised by the father- 
and-son team of Grant and Gavin Hawk, 
the E.T. (External Toggle) pushes knife 
locks to a new level of ingenuity. Grant 
and Gavin did not just think outside the 
box when designing the E.T, they threw 
the box in the trash and started from 
scratch. (For more on the original hand- 
made design of the knife, see the May 
2005 BLADE®.) 

Everything about this knife is 
unique, from the method of construction 
to the look and concept of blade lock- 
ing. A pivoting toggle at the butt of the 
E.T.'s handle locks/unlocks and 
opens/closes the blade. When holding 



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MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 45 





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hot locks 

not locks 




The Ball-Lock, 
the lookback 
mechanism of 
the new 
Spyderco Mini- 
Manix, reportedly 
can handle loads 
in excess of 1,000 
pounds on the back 
of the blade. Accord- 
ing to the author, the 
lock opens and closes 
smoothly and secures 
with an impressive click 
that reeks of solid engage- 
ment. A coil spring operates 
the lock for maximum strength 
and reliability. 



the knife in a standard grip, push the 
pivoting shoe with your middle finger 
and you can manipulate the blade 
almost magically open and closed, fast 
or slow — all safely and securely. 

The E.T is the most addictive knife I 
have ever used! It puts a butterfly knife to 
shame in this regard. Once you try one, 
you cannot resist the temptation to open 
and close it constantly. The E.T. is so cool 
that I predict a whole generation of knife 
lovers will get carpal tunnel syndrome 
from operating it. 1 had so much trouble 
putting it down that my wife threatened to 
take it away from me! 

The lock of the E.T. is extremely 
strong and the knife cannot accidentally 
unlock when held in a standard grip. A 
small, rotating tang safety locks the 
knife closed, which is particularly help- 
ful when you are using the carabiner on 
the back of the blade to clip the knife to 
a belt loop or other attachment. Every 
knife-gizmo lover and techie will love 
this knife. After about an hour of play- 
ing with it you will be a master of 
rapidly opening and closing the E.T. 



46 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Ball-Lock 

Spyderco, driven by the endless supply 
of design talent of another father-and- 
son duo, Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall- 
Of-Famer© Sal and Eric Glesser, has no 
shortage of new and exciting knives, but 
it is the company's re-engineering of the 
lockback and a totally new locking 
concept — the ball-lock — where its 
capacity for cutlery genius really shines 
through. 

The Spyderco-engineered lockback 
has been around for a few years. 
However, upon the debut of the 
company's Mini-Manix, Spyderco offi- 
cials assure me that they have designed 
the world's strongest folding knife — and 
I do not doubt them. Precision machin- 
ing and heat treating have converted the 
traditional lockback design into a 
powerhouse that can handle loads in 
excess of 1,000 pounds on the back of 
the blade. That is enough to crush most 
knives; in fact, most knives cannot 
handle a tenth of that load! 

Team Spyderco asserts that the 
lock's strength comes from the subtle 
re-engineering of lock geometry and the 
use of tougher components, such as 
pivots and screws, to completely bullet- 
proof the knife. This is certainly a 
robust effort. The lock opens and closes 
smoothly and secures with an impres- 








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BLADE/ 47 



Kelly Carlson 

54 So. Holt Hill, Antrim, NH 03440 





EDC 



www.carlsonknlves.com Tel: 603-588-2765 

kellycarlson@tds:net , 603-588-4223 

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interS^" 



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Collector Quality Folders 




The Big Bite Kasper 

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Each knife is handmade one at a time using the very best of 

materials to give each customer a unique high quality masterpiece. 

Credit cards accepted. 

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205 N. Center Drive • West Memphis, AR 72301 

(870) 732-2452 • www.crawfordknives.com 



ipt locks 

not locks 



Ciabatta and Alias 




The Bradley Alias (right) and 
ProTech Ciabatta are among the 
latest in locking folders. 

Two new locking folders of note 
are the Ciabatta from ProTech 
and the Alias from Bradley Cutlery 
Co. 

Designed in collaboration with 
Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famer' Blackie Collins, the Ciabatta 
features the Pin Lock Ultra Safety. 
The mechanism is "spring assisted" 
and activates only when you push 
the blade in toward the frame. To 
open, the knife must be in the 
button-end-up position. A detent 
keeps the blade closed so that it 
cannot be flipped open with gravity. 
Be sure to read the operating 
instructions that accompany the 
knife. MSRP: $250. 

The Alias secures open via the 
titanium Monolock, a frame lock 
with a notched spring for enhanced 
purchase. Though not revolutionary, 
it is a nice variation on an existing 
theme. The blade is CPM S30V and 
the handle is bead-blasted titanium 
with barrel spacers anodized blue. 

— By BLADE* staff 



48 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



sive click that reeks of solid engage- 
ment. A coil spring operates the lock for 
maximum strength and reliability. 

At 6 ounces, the Mini-Manix is not a 
lightweight but a hearty, maximum-duty 
knife that also has exquisite blade 
geometry for most cutting chores. I 
applaud Spyderco for revamping the 
lockback in this fashion. It is a confi- 
dence-inspiring, bull of a knife. 1 like 
the whole package very, very much. 

By the way, the ball-lock should not 
be confused with the ball-bearing lock. 
The latter, designed by Eric, is a very 
slick concept that uses a hardened stain- 
less ball bearing, also under coil-spring 
pressure, that bears against the hardened 
blade tang for exceptional security, 
smooth ambidextrous function and an 
open construction that allows for easy 
cleaning. I really like this lock for those 
reasons, but also for its innate simplicity 
and self-adjusting construction. The ball 
bearing rotates while operating the 
knife, so the locking will likely never 
wear out as the surface of the ball is 
constantly rotating and adjusting for fit 
against the blade tang. 



"By the way, the 

ball-lock should not 

be confused with the 

ball-bearing lock.' 

— the author 



11 



I would like to see this lock in some 
larger knives as I think its potential is 
being wasted on smaller knives such as 
the company's Poliwog. How cool would 
a Spyderco Military model with a ball- 
bearing lock be? I will watch closely at 
how this and other Spyderco locks 
develop over the next few years. 

Quality and Ingenuity 

In the name of overall knife improve- 
ment, the best manufacturers and 
designers are always trying to keep the 
innovations fresh and practical for the 
benefit of knife lovers everywhere. 
Support these innovators and demand 
that other companies strive to raise the 
bar, not only with quality, but also with 
ingenuity. In this fashion, knives will 
continue to exceed our wildest expecta- 
tions for years to come. 

For the contact information for the 
knives in the story, see "Where To Get 
'Em " on page 98. 




Sunfish Forge 



WWW.SUNFISHF0RGE.COM 



on n a n s o n 1 1 

P.O. Box 13 

Success, MO 65570 

573-674-3045 



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308 Regatta Dr. 

Niceville, FL 32578 

(850) 729-9174 




MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 49 



art .knives 

arc knives 




>* 



V 



v v* 



A stylized rendition of Lila Nikoloska, 
perhaps the world's pre-eminent 
dancer circa 1925, deeply carved in 
bas-relief and 18k yellow gold with 
a 14k-gold sash highlights the Art 
. Deco imagery of Stephen Olsze- 
_ wski's folder. The carved blade 
ft% is 440C stainless. (SharpBy- 
"W Coop.com photo) 










By Don Guild 





With its straiqht lines 
angular shapes and 
geometric forms, Art 
k -oil ideal* ' ; 



50 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Lloyd Hale's Art Deco folder rests upon a 
reproduction of a poster from the Exposi- 
tion Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et 
Industrial Moderns. Held in Paris in 1925, 
it is where the style that would become 
known as Art Deco got its name. The 
handle is sterling silver and reconstituted 
dark coral. The blade is 440C stainless. 



bV 




David Broadwell offers the 
Art Deco style in understat- 
ed fashion on the aluminum 
handle of his symmetrical 
one-hander. According to 
the author, it reflects the 
proper profile and silhouette 
of a good Deco knife. 



^traight and curved lines that both com- 
■ pete and coalesce; lithe feminine fig- 
% ures that run and leap; suns and rays 
■ and obelisks; all mesh in Art Deco, a 
M style that graces the handles of some 
of today's most stunning art folders. 



"It is bound 

to appear on 

more knives in 

the future." 

— the author 



The style raged for over 40 years be- 
fore the art critic, Bevis Hillier, coined a 
name for it in 1968 that stuck — Art Deco. 
It was launched in 1925 at the Exposition 
Internationale des Arts Decoratifs et In- 
dustrial Moderns in Paris, an event at- 
tended by 16 million people, and the influ- 
ence of the style reverberates to this day. 

Though Deco design features had 
been brewing some years before through 
lesser art movements such as arts and 
crafts and the work of the Scottish ar- 




Ron Skaggs embellished the stainless steel handle 
of Scott Sawby's folder in grand Art Deco style. The 
blade is ATS-34 stainless. 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 51 




Purveyors and Collectors 
ART KNIFE OFFERING 

Why do purveyors and collectors buy knives from 
me? Because I search the field constantly for the 
best in art knives: at major knife shows, on the 
web, collectors' estates, eBay, and directly from 
makers. I buy only the best. I also work with master 
makers co-designing singular knives. 
This year's winners: Best Art Knife Collaboration at 
the 2005 Blade Show and the Cronk Award at the 
2005 Guild Show. 

Several times a year, I search my personal collection of over 400 knives (I 
simply can't resist the artistry and buy too many knives). I select 50 to 70 
knives I am no longer madly in love with and place these knives on my Web 
■ site. I buy right. I sell right. 

People say I have an eye for art knives of enduring aesthetic value. This 
year, knives from my collection were chosen to appear on two Blade 
Magazine covers. I know quality assures lasting financial value. 

I add 60 or so knives to my Web site three or four times a year, then I send 
k an e-mail notice to my secure list of collectors and purveyors. Do you want 
|j to be on my e-mail list? Simply e-mail your request to me. Good things are 

coming up. Don Guild 

GET ON MY LIST NOW 

don@guildknives.com 

www.GUILDKNIVES.com 



Ever since our foundation in 1907,wc hav 

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chitect Charles Rennie Macintosh, Art 
Deco, with its angles and geometric 
graphics that include sun bursts, was 
considered reactionary to its command- 
ing predecessor, Art Nouveau (1890- 
1910), which consisted of foliated forms 



The 
ideal 
is to 

have the 
Deco knife 
designed 
from the 
ground up, 
rather than 
taking just 
any knife and 
throwing some 
Deco embellish- 
ment on it. The 
synergism of hav- 
ing the canvas — i.e., 
the raw knife — and 
the embellishment 
start from the same 
design concept 
results in a powerful 
statement. Owen Wood 
captures the idea here 
with the help of deep- 
engraved gold inlay by 
Amayak Stepa- 
nyan. (Sharp- 
ByCoop.com 
photo) 



■» 



52 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Lloyd Hale employed a window effect of 
white and black-lip mother-of-pearl to 
complete his Art Deco folding dagger. 




and swirling, arabesque lines. 

Due to the discovery of King Tut's 
tomb by Howard Carter in 1922, things 
Egyptian were "in." The Egyptian obe- 
lisk became a frequent Deco symbol. 
Art Deco evolved in art and architec- 
ture concurrently with Cubism, and in 
the late 1930s with Art Moderne and 
Streamline Moderne. 



"Due to the discov- 
ery of King Tut's 
tomb, things Egyp- 
tian were 'in.'" 

— the author 



Following the 1925 Paris exposition, 
Art Deco swept the world and was incor- 
porated in the designs of automobiles, 
fashion, cinema, furniture, architecture, 



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BLADE / 53 










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advertising and machined products. It 
continued to evolve into the late 1930s 
and has been called the "Art Style Be- 
tween the Wars." 

Deco & Art Knives 

So how does Art Deco fit in with art-knife 
design? Its refreshing look was made for 
knives because of its straight lines, an- 
gular shapes and geometric forms. What 
a welcome relief from the sea of "bank- 
note"-engraved knives! 

A few sophisticated makers have cre- 
ated excellent Art Deco knives using 
materials popular circa 1920-30, such as 
ivory, Bakelite (the first manmade plas- 
tic), Catalin (a synthetic resin used espe- 
cially in costume jewelry), tortoise shell, 
aircraft aluminum and others. 



"Simply placing a 
Deco design 
on scales or 
bolsters is only 
half the job." 
— the author 



Art Deco knives are rarely made be- 
cause it requires considerable study to be 
both proficient and confident enough to 
use Deco as a design element. 

For instance, I often hear those well 
schooled in art erroneously refer to Art 
Nouveau as Art Deco, and vice versa. To 
fully understand Deco requires studying 
Deco pieces of the period, such as glass, 
bronzes, jewelry, furniture, advertising 
and architecture until, in the blink of 
an eye, one knows enough to say "that's 
spot-on Deco" or "that's not Deco." 

Works by such makers as David 
Broadwell and the collaboration between 
Ken Steigerwalt and Ron Skaggs that 
served as the cover knife of the October 
BLADE® reflect the proper profile and 
silhouette of a good Deco knife. Even 
though a knife might be described as Art 
Deco, the basic knife before the embel- 
lishment might be far from a Deco de- 
sign. Simply placing a Deco design on 
scales or bolsters is only half the job. The 
ideal is to have the Deco knife designed 
from the ground up by someone versed 
in Deco, rather than taking just any knife 
and throwing some Deco embellishment 
on it. The synergism of having the can- 
vas — i.e., the raw knife — and the embel- 



54 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




The cover 
knife for 
the October 
BLADE®, the 
Art Deco col- 
laboration folder 
by Ken Steigerwalt 
and Ron Skaggs 
features a number of 
Deco themes, includ- 
ing a thin woman — in this case, the 
great early 20th-century dancer, Lila 
Nikoloska — in motion, the sun and its 
rays, and an Egyptian obelisk at the 
butt. (Point Seven photo) 




Made in the USA 



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David G. Shirley and 
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7266 U.S. 2 and 41, Gladstone, Ml 49837 



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MARCH 2006 



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BLADE / 55 




LAS VEGAS, NV. 



Case Collection 



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2006 




2006 BLADE SHOW 
WEST 

September 15, 16, 17, 2006 
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arTknTves 



lishment start from the same design con- 
cept results in a powerful statement. 

Elements used to depict Deco can be 
scrimshaw, thick gold inlay, well-defined 
filework, deep engraving, mosaic inlay, 
and work performed on metal and organ- 
ic materials. 

How can you tell if a Deco knife is 
true through and through? Look at ex- 
amples of Art Deco on quality online 
auction sites. For even more eye candy, 
study Deco books. And, of course, the 
Internet's good oF Google Images (not 
Google Web) has thousands of authentic 
Deco pictures waiting to be ogled. (Au- 
thor's note: To access Google Images on 
the Internet, type whatever you are inter- 
ested in at Google Search. A long list of 
text will come up about your subject. At 
the top of the page on the left-hand side 
will be the words "Web, Images, Groups, 
News," etc. Click on "Images" and pic- 
tures only will appear of whatever sub- 
ject you have entered.) 

Element Compatibility 

The 1926 facade of the Folies Bergere 
in Paris immortalizes Lila Nikoloska, 
the pre-eminent dancer of the day. The 
25-foot-high bas-relief above the facade 
provided inspiration for a Stephen Olsze- 



"The ideal is to 
have the Deco 
knife designed 

from the ground 
up by someone 

versed in Deco." 
— the author 



wski Deco folder and the Skaggs/Stei- 
gerwalt collaboration, yet the knives are 
different expressions of the same image. 
Each of these beautifully executed Deco 
knives has a compatibility of elements 
that combines to produce a sum greater 
than its parts, illustrating how a well- 
done Deco knife has all of its constituent 
elements blending in harmony — blade 
shape, silhouette, handle profile, and, the 
coup de grace, the application of authen- 
tic Deco art. 

Many Art Deco designs incorporate 
sharp angles (some asymmetrical, others 
symmetrical); a sun and its rays; stylized 
female and animal forms (usually thin, 



56 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



often in motion); progressively stepped- 
up curves; geometric shapes; deeply 
carved bas-relief; and full circles (some- 
times seen with half one color or texture, 
the other half in contrast). 



"A well-done Deco 

knife has all 

of its constituent 

elements blending 
in harmony." 
— the author 



So why bother embellishing a knife? 
Because, though to analytical left-brain 
types a precisely made mechanical ob- 
ject is attractive, when an appropriate art 
design is applied, its appeal is amplified 
and its value soars. Men, and sometimes 
women, fall in love with cars, watches, 
appliances, motorcycles and perfectly 
machined objects, showing that when 
artful and appropriate designs are ap- 
plied, the attractiveness of these items is 
maximized. 

Why use Art Deco as an embellish- 
ment theme for art knives? Because its 
design configurations are avant-garde 
and so appropriate; they present the new- 
est, freshest look to the eye. Yet only a 
few top knifemakers have been able to 
properly integrate a complex and com- 
plete Deco art knife by working verti- 
cally (sole authorship). However, in the 
future, as the bar rises for more sophis- 
ticated design in art knives, top works 
evolving through a horizontal collabora- 
tion of talents should emerge. 

As the saying goes, for the ideal 
knife, "first function then form." Where 
does this leave Art Deco? It is an inter- 
national style with a statement so fresh 
and sassy that it is bound to appear on 
more knives in the future. 

Art Deco dominated design for al- 
most every object made in the 20th cen- 
tury and was the last great international 
design rage to appear on the worldwide 
scene. What art form will dominate 
next? Possibly none, as today's world has 
such an eclectic mixture of expressions. 
But Art Deco will grow in importance, 
as it is the world's last great art style. 
Viva Art Deco! 

For the contact information for the 
knives in the story, see "Where To Get 
'Em" on page 98. 




Italian Autos -French Autos - German Autos -American Autos 

If it's an Auto, you will find it here & tor the best price on the internet! 

Also visit www.Swinguard.Com & www.Flatblaster.Coin I 



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BladeGallery.Com 


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We look forward to seeing you in Napa for this unique Event!!! 



•Mdaih 



The Collectors' Show 



idjjingflrt and Culinary 'Worlds with ( Fine Cutlery 




MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 57 



cytfSJita 




Dan Farr was one of only two 
contestants to cut the "running- 
mouse" dowel in "Cook's Wild 
Mouse Attack" in the 2005 ABS 
World Championship Cutting Com- 
petition at the BLADE Show. At left 
is J.R. Cook, the test's namesake, 
releasing the tape measure that 
activated the "running mouse." 
(Hughes photo) 



In his 1st-generation knife, Dan Farr incor- 
porated a beveled spine that enables the cut 
material to flow past the spine with less turbu- 
lence and drag, with the added benefit of re- 
ducing the overall weight of the blade. He also 
employed a steeper, more swedge-like bevel 
nearer the tip for added speed. He forged the 
blade from 5160 carbon steel and hardened 
the edge only. He stippled the handle for a bit 
of texture to aid in gripping. 





Evolution by 
Generation 

Part I of II 

See how Dan Fair's five 
generations of knives 
evolved on his road 
to the '05 World 
Championship 
Cutting Competition 

By Roger Pinnock 



58 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



If you have yet to witness a cutting 
competition, I highly recommend it 
for the visual spectacle alone. The 
varied events are designed not only 
to test the cutting ability of both the 
knives and the makers, but to hold the 
attention of the large crowds of onlook- 
ers as well. 

While the events are both entertain- 
ing and informative for the spectators, 
arguably their greatest significance may 
be lost on many: what they teach the 
makers about their knives and how to 
make them better. 



"That's the first 
knife I ever had 
talk back to me." 

— Greg Neely 



Dan Farr first entered such a competi- 
tion at a New York hammer-in in the fall 
of 2002, using not a dedicated competi- 
tion knife but one of his ABS journeyman 
smith test knives that he had on hand. To 
his great surprise, Dan won. The follow- 
ing year would see him competing on a 
more regular basis at cutting competi- 



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Attributes of a 

Good Cutting 

Competition Knife 

Speed 

Light weight, distal taper, flat or slight 
convex grind, fuller. 

Balance and Control 

Not tip heavy. Natural to swing and 
easy to check the swing. 

Indexing Handle 

Permits blade to be swung in a plane 

with weight behind the edge. Re- 
sists twisting or sliding. Design must 
provide for a secure but relaxed grip; 
texture is just a bonus. Forward sup- 
port for speed and power. 

Material Flow 

Low friction finish, beveled spine, 

with steeper bevel toward tip for 

added speed. 

Edge Geometry and Finish 

Convex edge for strength and mate- 
rial flow — must be measurable to be 
repeatable. Fine ceramic finish for 
micro-toothiness. 



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BLADE / 59 



J 



^teffiS 




CTttin 



Eat My Shorts is the fairly audacious 
statement Dan stenciled on the blade 
dfihlsTZhOztj eneration knife. Among the 
j nSn^SSjPan made were a completely 
mfpeneaWlade^vi ih a spring-tempered 
pine; a full flat grind for reduced 
wei qntmrW*a dded speed; 10 inches 
f blade leng ih^t he maximum allow- 
m&=£nEimol^irppy nithe handle for 
icreased power. A visible difference is 



bevel of the 







E DEDICATION TO THE PERFORMANCE BLADE » 



Welcome to a discussion about 
the world of knives. 



tions across the nation, ultimately earn- 
ing him a place as one of the five final- 
ists in the World Championship Cutting 
Competition at the 2005 BLADE Show. 
Through it all, he designed and forged 
five distinct generations of competition 
models in a continuing effort to build a 
better knife. 

I was fortunate enough to buy Dan's 
most recent version of his competition 
knife at the '05 BLADE Show, and was 
interested to learn more about its devel- 
opment. Several weeks later I visited his 
shop in Rochester, New York, and tested 
each of the five generations of competi- 
tion knives while executing a number of 
the same cuts employed in the cutting 
competitions. 

The accuracy of my tests was aided 
in no small part by the fact that Dan built 
and donated the now-familiar cutting 
apparatus used in the old ABS cutting 
competitions, and thus had available a 
regulation rig in his backyard. While 
I did not have the pressure of a large 



While the author did not have thfrpres- 
sure of a large crowd watching, cutting 
free-hanging rope and free-standing 
water bottles for the first time in front of 
a World Championship Cutting Com- 
petition finalist (Dan Fan, who is out. 
of camera range) was a bit intimidating. 
(Pinn'ock photo) % 



~ttW- 


T m ^^F9I 


m 

i i i 

i i 


ri 




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MARCH 2006 



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crowd watching, cutting free-hanging 
rope and free-standing water bottles for 
the first time in front of a world cham- 
pionship finalist was a bit intimidating. 
Dan was either kind enough not to laugh 
or else considerate enough to be real 
quiet about it. 

One thing I learned is that all of 
the cutting challenges are more diffi- 
cult than they look. More importantly, 
I gained some real insight into just how 
instructive the competitions can be for 
the participants. 

"The Big Lug" 

Dan considered himself to be the fortu- 
nate beneficiary of a seminar presented 
by ABS master smith Jerry Fisk at the 
New York hammer-in on the very perti- 
nent subject of competition knife design. 
In his typically casual and off-the-cuff 
manner, Jerry offered a lot of guidance 
on the subject, including blade design, 
edge profile, handle drop and cutting 
techniques. (See the story about Jerry's 
one-man knife show on page 20.) 



"The beveled 

spine enables the 

cut material to 

flow past 

the spine with 

less turbulence 

and drag." 

— the author 



Dan incorporated much of the ad- 
vice into the design of his lst-genera- 
tion competition cutter. Dubbed "the 
Big Lug," it has a beveled blade spine 
that enables the cut material to flow 
past the spine with less turbulence and 
drag, with the added benefit of reduc- 
ing the overall weight of the blade. Dan 
employed a steeper, more swedge-like 
bevel nearer the tip to enhance speed. 
He forged the blade from 5160 carbon 
steel and hardened the edge only. Dan 
also stippled the handle for a bit of tex- 
ture to aid in gripping, though he has- 
tens to note that the key to a good grip is 
a quality handle design, that the texture 
of the stippling is merely a bonus. 

The knife first saw action in the cut- 
ting competition at the Bill Moran Blade- 
smithing Expo in the fall of 2003, where 



62 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Dan finished second. The knife per- 
formed reasonably well in competition, 
though the edge would subsequently fail 
in Dan's own more rigorous testing after 
the event. While the handle did provide a 
fairly secure grip, he wanted a design that 
would effectively lock his hand in place 
no matter what test was being performed. 
The Big Lug worked well for me — very 
quick and light, though lacking some of 
the power of the later models. All told, it 
is a very user-friendly knife. 

"Eat My Shorts" 

"Eat My Shorts" was the fairly audacious 
statement stenciled on the blade of the 
2nd-generation knife that Dan took to 
the ABS hammer-in at Old Washington, 
Arkansas, in the spring of 2004. Upon 
inspecting the knife, ABS Master Smith 
Greg Neely was heard to say, "That's the 
first knife 1 ever had talk back to me." 



"Dan employed 

a steeper, more 

swedge-like bevel 

nearer the tip to 

enhance speed." 

— the author 



A number of running changes were 
incorporated on the 2nd generation, in- 
cluding the move to a completely hard- 
ened blade with a spring-tempered spine; 
a full flat grind for reduced weight and 
added speed; 10 inches of blade length — 
the maximum allowable — and more drop 
in the handle for increased power. A vis- 
ible difference is the addition of a curved 
plunge cut for greater strength. (Editor's 
note: According to Dan, the plunge cut is 
where the flat of the ricasso transitions 
to the bevel of the blade.) Farr gleaned 
valuable information about the curved 
plunge cut from his studies with ABS 
master smith C. Robbin Hudson, as well 
as from R.J. Martin. 

Perhaps the most significant change, 
however, was the incorporation of a for- 
ward support at the top side of the handle 
where it meets the guard. The gentle rise 
and bulge proved to be a significant step 
forward in Dan's goal of a comfortable, 
ergonomic grip that locks the hand in 
place during hard use. He found inspira- 
tion for the forward support in the user- 
friendly handle designs of Walt Powell's 
custom fly rods (the hand action in chop- 
ping with a knife and casting a fly rod 
is similar), which just goes to show that 
good ideas can come from any number of 
various sources. Dan found that the for- 



| [^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



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Arkansas Custom Knife Show Partial List of Tableholders 9/21/2005 



Jerome Anders 
David Anders 
Russ Andrews 
Larry Bailey 
Reggie Barker 
Craig Braschler 
Sam Butler 
Craig Camerer 
James Cook 
Gary Crowder 
JimCrowell 
Ken Durham 
Fred Durio 
Rodger Echols 
Shawn Ellis 
Lee Ferguson 
Jerry Fisk 
John Fitch 
Joe Flournoy 
Muller Forge 
Ronnie Foster 
Brett Catlin 



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Cordon Graham 
John Greco 
Mike Johnson 
Nate Kelsey 
Harvey King 
Ray Kirk 
Tom Krein 
Jerry Lairson, Sr. 
Dr. James Lucie 
Magee Knives 
John Martin 
Roger Massey 
Jerry McClure 
Jerry McDonald 
Ron Mobbs 
Sidney Moon 
Gary Mulkey 
Bob Neal 
MarkNevling 
Corbin Newcomb 
Ron Newton 



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Henry Parker 
James Parks 
John Perry 
Pete Peterson 
Benjamin Piccola 
Cliff Polk 
Rusty Polk 
J. W. Randall 
Vernon Red 
Lin Rhea 
Dennis Riley 
Les Robertson 
Dickie Robinson 
James Rodebaugh 
George Roth 
Michael Ruth 
Richard Self 
Marvin Solomon 
Charles Stout 
Brion Tomberlin 
ArtTycer 



Jim Walker 
Chuck Ward 
John Weever 
John White 
Mike Williams 
Curtis Wilson 
Gary Zweimueller 



Suppliers 
Giraffebone.com 
Green River Leather 
Mother of Pearl 
Pop Knife Supplies 
Riverside Machine 
Rowe's Leather 
Texas Knifemakers 
Supply 

American Bladesmith 
Society 
Knife World 
Knifemakers Guild 



lit" ANNUAL SHOW 
www.arkansasknifemakers.com 



Arkansas 



David Etchieson 501/472-8446 email: aka@alliancecable.net 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 63 




Canadian Knifemakers 
Guild Show 



Saturday, march 18, 2006 

and 

Sunday, march 19, 2006 

10am to 4pm 

Days Inn Toronto Airport 

6257 Airport Road 
mississauga, Ontario 

Reseruations: (905) 678 1400 

(Hsk for Canadian Knifemakers Guild Group Rate) 



For more information, call 
ERIC ELSOn (519) 453 4482 

www.ckg.org 



^&m 





P.0JoH«S-lostaitos,CHBJ3l!-SE3» 





■ nemesis-hires,! 




Look closely at the handles of the 
1st- and 2nd-generation knives and 
you can see the subtle yet significant 
changes Dan made, including more 
"drop" toward the butt. Perhaps the most 
significant change was the incorpora- 
tion of a forward support at the top side 
of the handle where it meets the guard. 
The gentle rise and bulge proved to be 
an important step forward in Dan's goal 
of a comfortable, ergonomic grip that 
locks the hand in place during hard use. 
(Pinnock photo) 

ward support produced noticeable gains 
in both power and control, and would 
remain a consistent design element in fu- 
ture generations of his cutting competi- 
tion knives. 

My immediate impression was that 
the forward rest makes a big difference 
in providing a secure grip. The 2nd-gen- 
eration knife feels every bit as quick to 
me as the 1st generation, and the length- 
ened blade seems to give it more speed 
and power. 

Next time, in the conclusion, the author 
reviews generations three through five of 
Dan's competition cutters. 

For more on Dan Farr s knives, contact 
him at 285 Glen Ellyn Way, Dept. BL3, 
Rochester, NY 14618 585.721.1388 
ddfarr@aol. com. 



64 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



fci§) 



Suppliers Of Premium Quality 
Natural Handle Materials! 



% 










•>«■* %A 



W&& 



India Samhar Stag 

Scales & Rolls • Tapers • Carvers • Crownsticks • Warthog Tusks 
Hippo Tusks ■ African Horns ■ XL Black & Gold Lip Pearl Scales 



Email: clcnhuntingl @comca st.net 

ivivw.elenhunting.com 
973-379-5296 



Contact us for 
a free brochure! 



Elen Hunting & Importing Inc 





LOVELESS KNIVES 

-Buy-Sell-Trade- 



„ „ w ., 706-896-2292 24 Hrs. 

Call or Write: 

J.W. Denton 

102 N. Main St., Box 429 

Hiawassee, GA 

30546-0429 FAX 706-896-1212 • E-mail: jwdenton@aIltel.net 




Associate Member 
Knifemakers Guild 



Randall IDadt Krfves 




P.O. Box 1988 
Orlando, Florida 32802 

WRITE FOR 40-PAGE FULL COLOR CATALOG - PRICE $2.00 
INTL. MAILING - CATALOG US $5.00 http://www.randallknives.com 



► Your Source 


for European Knives 




Puma ■ Bbker ■ Dovo ■ Eickhorn 
Fallkniven ■ Helle ■ Marttiini 
EKA ■ Opinel ■ Laguiole 
Wenger ■ Victorinox 
and many others... 


^**»^_ ||J ^K* 


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MOONBLADE 

CUSTOM 

KNIVES 



>eT1 



2yi>5 &UXJ £%k> 

MIKEMOONEY 

480.987.3576 • Cell 480.244.7768 

1 9432 E. Cloud Road * Queen Creek, AZ 85242 

www.moonblades.com ■ mike@moonblades.rnni 



«■. 



15th Annual 

Greater Shenandoah Valley 

Knife Show 

Fri.-Sun., 
March 31st - April 2nd 

Rockingham Co. Fairgrounds 
Harrisonburg, VA 

For Show & Booth Info Contact 

Joey Foltz 

540-833-6500 
www.svkc.com 



66 /BLADE 



blademag.com MARCH 2006 



Finest Quality 
Superior Service 

Popular Blade Material 

440C, 440V, ATS-34, 154 CM, 

BG-42, 52100, D-2, 0-1 , A-2, 1084, 

15N20, Nickel 200, Damascus. 
Guard Bolster & Liners 

304, 416, 410, Nickel Silver, Titanium, 

Brass, Copper and Aluminum. 
Handle Material 

Colored G-10, Carbon Fiber, Colored 

Phenolics, Natural Woods, 

Dymondwood®, Horn, Bone and 

Reconstructed Stone. 
Pocket Knife Supplies 

Steel Balls, Washers, Thumbbobs, 6 

Spline and Hex Screws, Clips, Mokume, 

Mosaic Bolsters and Pivot Pins. 
Machinery 

Heat Treat Supplies, Tools, Handle Bolts, 

Polishing Supplies, Engraving Supplies, 

Abrasive Belts, Blades, Books & Videos. 

Catalogs $5.00 U.S.A. 
* $8.00 outside U.S.A. 

SHEFFIELD KNIFEMAKERS 
SUPPLY INC. 

P.O. Box 741107, Orange City, FL 32774-1107 

Phone: 386-775-6453 • Fax: 386-774-5754 

Web: http://www.sheffieldsupply.com 

E-mail: sheffsup@totcon.com 



U.S. MARINE: LARRY KEEN- MASTER SERGEANT 

ONE OF THE FOUNDING MEMBERS OF TOPS FIELD TEAM 




LARRY E. KEEN 

FORCE RECON TYPE 

23 YEARS ACTIVE DUTY 

INSTRUCTOR - COMBAT SPEC OPS 

PARA, SCUBA, RANGER, RECONDO, TRACKER 

HIT WITH A .51 CAL + 82 MM MORTAR 

IN NAM AND STILL A 

"HARD CHARGER!" 



..the night was eoUL, 
the moon was low... 
...the enemy was in sight... 





#MR88 
MOCCASIN-RANGER" 



Price 

$199.00 

+ S&H 



(Combat/Sportsman) 

Blade Length - 6 1/2" 
Cutting Edge - 5 7/8" 
01 A Length - 11 3/4" Thickness - 114" 
Blade Color - Black Traction Coating 
Steel - 1095 High Carbon Alloy Re 58 
Handle - Black Linen Micarta® 
Sheath Included 
Mfg. - Handcrafted in the USA 



TOPS 

Tactical-OPS USA 

P. O. Box 2544 

Idaho Falls, ID 83403 

Phone (208) 542-0113 

FAX (208) 552-2945 

Internet: www.topsknives.com 

...BORN IN THE USA... 




U. S. MARINES TRUST TOPS 
...CAUSE THEY'RE HARD TO THE CORE" 



"Knife Making 
Sanding Belts" 

LOWEST PRICES 



Top Quality Cloth Belts A/O 



Size 

l"x30" 
l"x42" 
2" x 48" 
2" x 60" 
2"x 72" 
4"x36" 
6" x 48" 



Any grit 

.700 ea. 

.700 ea. 
$1.15 ea. 
$1.40 ea. 
$1 .70 ea. 
$1.20ea. 
$2.90 ea. 




* Belts (any-size) sheets, discs, rolls, etc. 

Available in A/O - sil-carbide, Zirconia, 
Cork, Scotch-brite material 

G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co. 

(Abrasive specialist) 

12771 Rt. 536 
Punxsutawney, PA 15767 

814-938-2379 for info & catalogs 

800-938-0021 purchases only 

VISA, MasterCard, C.O.D. 

shipping & handling $7.95 



Knivesngear.com 



• Chris Reeve • Strider 
Ox Forge •Randall 




& many other high end blades 

727-776-3442 
knivesngear@tampabay.rr.com 



No. 3 Five Inch 

M.S. A. Co. Safety Hunting Knife 

2002 Reproduction 




BOWIE CORPORATION 

2036 13th Street, Menominee, Ml 49858 

www.bowiecorporation.com 

ph: 906.864.3922 • fax: 906.864.3924 

Toll Free: 877-622-2397 



NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW! 

SIMBAF£€$$ 

NECK LOCK / SLIDE LOCK 
with 3 advantages: 




+ for right and left handed users 
+ self adjusting lock 
+ closed blade is hold by springforce. 
Made in GERMANY 

www.simbatec.com 



MARCH 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE/ 67 



TOPS KNIVES 

COMBAT TESTED - BATTLE PROVEN 
IRAQ - AFGHANISTAN ■ BOSNIA 
LA. - CHICAGO ■ MIAMI 




SRP 
$329.00 
+ S&H 

Blade Color ■ 
Tactical Black 

Handles - Black 
Linen Micarta® 

Steel - S30V Re 60 
Heat Treated by 

Paul Bos 
OIA - 12 3/4" 
Blade- 7.0" X(Wie' 



tRSSM- Blade -3 1/8" X(3jW) 




"(_/ f ***** n{Jf***** BUY 

OLD GERBER, LOVELESS, ANTIQUE, CUSTOM KNIVES 

SELL SELL- SELL 

JAPANESE GENUINE SWORDS 
from SEKI, Capital of Japanese Sword 




SETO 



CUTLERY JAPAN 



NO. 674, INAGUCHI-CHO, SEKI-CITY, GIFU-PREF, 501-3932 JAPAN. 
TEL 81 -575-22-8892 FAX 81-575-24-1895 

CORMORANT E-mail: sunny@setocut.co.jp http://www.setocut.co.jp/ 



CUSTOM KNIVES 



624 Kings Highway North 
Rochester, NY 14617 

585-544-1948 



HEAVY DUTY HUNTER 



dickfaustknives@mac.com 



www.knifeshows.com/faust 




Custom 

Antique 

Commemoratives 

Immediate Payment. 

• No Collection Too 
Large Or Too Small! 

• We Purchase Entire Knife Collections! 

• A Fair And Reputable Dealer For Over 25 Years. 




Tru Hone 

Knife Sharpener 

The Tru Hone Knife 

Sharpener gives you a per- 
fectly sharpened knife in a 
fraction of the time 
required by old-fash- 
ioned methods. It sharpens both bevels of a knife 
blade simultaneously, resulting in equal bevels and 
precision sharpness in less than a minute. The 
Tru Hone can easily be adjusted to different angles 
allowing you to tailor your knives for any type of 
cutting operation. Its heavy duty stainless steel 
construction and 1/2 hp motor means you will get 
years of maintenance free knife sharpening. 

Tru Hone Corp. 

1721 NE 19th Ave. • Ocala, FL 34470 USA 
1-800-237-4663 

(352) 622-1213 • FAX (352) 622-9180 



RIVERSIDE MACHINE 

UNCLE AL 
THE KNIFEMAKER'S PAL! 

Everything for 
Knife Making! 

201 W. Stillwell 
DeQueen, AR 71832 

(870) 642-7643 

FAX (870) 642-4023 

E-MAIL: uncleal@ipa,net 

www.riversidemachine.net 



68 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



CustomKnives.com 

"Many Knives, Many Makers" 




AT. Barr, 153 Madonna Drive, Nicholasville, KY 40356 (859) 887-5400 




Tops 

Tactical-Ops Knives 

William Henry Knives 

Benchmade Knives 

Navy Seal Watches 

Meerdink 

Custom Knives 

J.T.'s Knife Shop 

264 East Main Street 

Port Jervis, NY 12771 

(845) 856-6904 

www.jtknives.com 



A What do YOU want to know? 



| Ed Caffrey - ABS i 
H Dwayne Dusha 



|, Chuck Burrow 
{{ David Br 
Jj Johnny* 
1 Gene ' 



Sculpting }i 
.ollow Grinding N 
Cable Damascus J 



ii 



>ss Instructional videos a 

CCInstructionalVideos.com [i 
(817) 281-5424 I] 



MARLOWE KNIVES 



Charles Marlowe 




10822 Poppleton Ave. 

Omaha, NE 68144 

(402) 933-5065 

E-mail: 

cmarlowel@cox.net 



www.marloweknives.com 



Handmade 



Gary Root 




Bob Eggerling Barbwire Damascus 

5 3/4" Blade 

Osage Wood Handle 



644 East 14th Street • Erie, PA 16503 • 
814-459-0196 



TOPS KNIVES 

NOW ... CAUSE 

THERE AIN'T 
NO TOMORROW 




MARCH 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE/ 69 



For Dealers Only! 



For Dealers Only! 



For Dealers Only! 




Exclusive! 



• • 




Available only at 

National Knife 

Distributors. Inc. 



I The Phantom Reflex, wilh ils new touch force 
technology, offers the speed and dependabili- 
ty of an automatic fen He in an assisted opening' tormat. 
The patent pending design of Ihe newest Randall King's folders 
makes it one ol the most practical pocket knives on today's market. 
Has T-6 aluminum handles with a camntlauge anodization, the knife is very 
strong, yet light. Has an ATS-34 blade wilh a black oxide coating. From lhe lacti- 
cal arena to the ollice. (ha Phantom Rellex is engineered lor quality. 
fTEM # RKPRCAMB Retail S1 69.95 



We Also Carry: 

^COLUMBIA BUCK 
Smith £ Wesson 

COLO STEEL Ka- Bar 




4 " iv- '' 




LEATHER MAN 



Automatic 
Knives 



Call Us Toll Free 

1-800-447-4342 " 



•Brand Names 
•Dependable Sales Staff 



•Courteous Operators 
•Quick Service 



125 Depot St. Forest City, NC 28043 Telephone 828-245-4321 Fax 828-245-5121 
E-Mail us at nkdi@nkdi.com or Visit our web site at www nkdi.com 



www.blacksmithsdepot.com 



World's Finest Blacksmithing 

Tools and Equipment 

Best Prices 

Sold By Experienced Blacksmiths 

NEW!! Peddinghaus 2 

Fly Press Horn Anvils 



[ I orgcmasler" 




Kayne and Son 

Custom Hardware, Inc. 

100 Daniel Ridge Road 

Candler, NC 28715 

(828) 667-8868 or 665-1988 

fax (828) 665-8303 



I 
I 
I 



I 



"PICK YOUR PLAYGROUND" 















0000 Hrs. 
0100 Hrs. 
0200 Hrs. 
0300 Hrs. 
0400 Hrs. 
0500 Hrs. 
0600 Hrs. 
0700 Hrs. 
0800 Hrs. 



On Duty - Night Shift 
High Risk Entry 
SWAT Callout 
Officer Needs Assist 
Chopper Insertion Rescue 
Street Fight 
Drug Boat Interdiction 
Emergency Response Team 
Armed Vehicle Patrol 



Anywhere 

Border Town, Pakistan 
Ramparts, Los Angeles 
Downtown Miami 
Mountains, Afghanistan 
Fallujah, Iraq 
Keywest, Florida 
Pipeline Probe, Iraq 
Downtown, Baghdad 

...and the day has just begun... For GUYS that PLAY for KEEPS- 
TOPS KNIVES "ON DUTY" 



I 




FREE KNIFE CATALOG 



Cera-Titan Blade 




To place an order or request a FREE catalog 
of knives, call toll-free: 800.992.6537x18 
or write to: Boker USA.1550 Balsam St. 
Lakewood, CO 80214-5917 



188 Zeta 
V $97.95 




Fine Japanese Knives direct from Japan 

With 750 years of sword -making history and 

tradition, we offer the finest brand knives direct 

from Seki, Japan at the great saving prices. 

HATT0RI, HIR0, SEKI-CUT, 
MCUSTA, SAJI & MORE 



www.JapaneseKnifeDirect.com 



70 /BLADE 



blademag.com MARCH 2006 



GAS FORGE 

Shape Your Large Blades 
By Hot Forging 



NC 
Knifemaker 




Reaches Welding Temperature 

NC 
Lowboy 




FREE CATALOG 



R 



NC Tool Company Inc 

6133 Hunt Road 

Pleasant Garden, NC 27313 

1-800-446-6498 




TITANIUM 



6AL/4V and Commercially Pure Titanium, Sheet, 

Bar, Rod, Stainless Steel Fasteners; Carbon Fiber, 

G-10; Titanium Pocket Clip Blanks 



Specializing in hard to find knifemaking materials 



- Full line of Tactical Knife-making Supplies 

- 6 Lobe Stainless Steel Fasteners 

- Wholesale Prices on Carbon Fiber 

- G-10 Available in Colors 

- Rings 

See Our New Specials Page 
on www.halperntitanium.com 

Call: 888-283-8627 
Fax:413-289-2372 

Web site: http://www.halperntitanium.com 
E-Mail Address: info@halperntitanium.com 



HALPERN TITANIUM, INC 

fTST'i P.O. Box 214, Three Rivers, MA 01080 |SS 



April 8-9, 2006 

Knights of Columbus Hall • 400 North Beau Chateaux, Bethalto, IL 
Dealers - 6' Tables - $35.00 Each - No Limit 



jjfflr 



Show Hours: 

8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. Saturday 8:30 A.M. - 2:00 P.M. Sunday 
Admission: Adults $2.00 Children Under 12, Free With Adult 



a ' S:0 °P.M. 



Local Motels: 

Alton Holiday Inn (618) 462-1220 • Alton Super 8 (800) 800-8000 
Budget Inn Alton (618) 463-0800 • Alton Comfort Inn (618) 465-9999 

Contact 

Gene Winston • 7 Santa Anita Dr., Maryville, IL 62062 • (618) 288-6974 



rOllt" Measure of Quality 



Custom Made Knives 




George Trout 

P.O. Box 13 Cuba Ohio 45114 

Ph. 937-382-2331 

gandjtrout@rasn.cora 




www.jaysknives. com 

Discontinuec 
Schrade Smok 

3-3/4" Lock-Bac 

w/Leather Sheath 

Special Price $39.95 
Includes Free Shipping!! 

Call for Catalog 
Toll Free 1-877-393-2792 

American Edge 

P.O. Box 292 Rice, MN S6367 




MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 71 



TOPS KNIVES 

BE READY: THE BEST 

PREPARATION FOR 

THE WORST SITUATION 



" NITE CHASER " 



"SEA WOLFE" 




SRP 

$149.00 

+ S&H 

Blade Length - 3 7/8" 
OIA Length - S 1/4" 
Hunter's Point 
Blade Thickness- (W) 
Blade Color - Tactical Gray 
Handles - Black Linen Micarta® 
Steel - 154CM - flc 58 Ciyo Treated 



s 



" BAGHDAD " ATC-PANTERO " 

BULLET ™ .2?™ _#PA1050 
#BAGB-03 

Handle - 

Blue/Black G-10 

OIA - 6 114" 

Blade -3 112" 
x(3/I6j 




(SPECIAL ASSAULT WEAPON) 

When There's No Time 
For A Second Cfiance 

Sfce/efon/zed 
Handle 




$139.00 



#SAW-01 



Handle ■ Black G-10 

Steel ■ 1095 High 
Carbon Alloy Re 58 

OIA - 7 1/2" Blade - 3 112" X (3/765 



#SAW-02 



#107C/OK 



" STEEL E4GLES " ™ 

\ #107C OIA - 13" 

* Blade-7"X(jW) 



SRP #107C 

& 107D 

199.00 

fS4H 






SRP 
$249.00 
+S&H 

| #t07D - OIA - 13" 
Blade - 7" x (JW) 

#111A-OIA- 16" 
| Blade - 11" x (W) 
'Opposing Pitch Saw- Teeth 
Change Saw Style 
Handles - B/acfc Linon Micarta® 
I Steel - 1095 High Carbon Alloy Re 58 "" 



...CAUSE THEY'RE HARD TO THE CORE! ™... 

A Tactical-OPS USA 

<KPi P. O. Box 2544 Idaho Falls, ID 83403 
/*JJ\ PH: (208) 542-01 13 FAX: (208) 552-2945 
TOPS ...BORN IN THE USA... www.topsknives.com 





Bill Moran School of Bladesmithing 


2 






Washington, Arkansas 




DATE 


CLASS 


INSTRUCTOR 


6 


Feb. 13-24 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Robinson/Massey 




Feb. 27-Mar. 3 


Damascus 


Fitch 


C 


Mar. 27-Apr. 7 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Dean/Flournoy 


Apr. 10-14 


Damascus 


Williams 


L 


Apr. 17-21 


Handles & Guards 


Cook 


A 


May 6 -7 


Spring Hammer-In 


Neely/Fisk/Williams 


S 


May 8-19 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Neely/Gaston 


s 


Jun 26- Jul. 7 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


K. & H. Harvey 




Jul. 10-14 


Damascus 


Tim Foster 




Jull7-Jul28 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


Fuller/Crowell 


s 


Jul 31 -Aug. 4 


Handles & Guards 


Walker 


c 


Oct. 2-13 


Intro to Bladesmithing 


TBA 


H 


Oct. 16-20 


Damascus 


Dunn 


E 


Oct. 23-27 


Handles & Guards 


Anders 


D 
U 




Schedule subject to change 




L 


Contact Mr. Scotty Hayes, ABS School Director 


E 




903/838-4541, ext. 237 






Texarkana College — 


- 500 N. Robison Road — Texarkana, TX 75599 



ohare ^nives 



"Silver Raven" 




S*an O'llarc 

H67-69S-2GI" 

I'd BOJ 374 

Fort Simpson, NT 

Canada, XOK 0N0 

scan it iihjirL'kimeN.ta 

ti w \\ . h a re k n i ves. L-a 



Edmund Davidson 



The Integral- 

The Ultimate 

Hand Tool 



BG-4Z Steel 





Loveless 
Design 

Straight 
Hunter 



345 Virginia Ave. 

Goshen, VI 244.19 

Phone: 540-997-5651 

irif'ir.<><flllllll</ff(frif/.soil.<-oill 




Don't miss the next 




Blade 




Magazine 


May '06 Jan. 18, 


2006 


June '06 Feb. 15, 


2006 


July '06 Mar. 15, 


2006 


August '06 April 19, 


2006 


For adverting Information donlacl 




Blade 




Magazine 


i 


700 E. State St. 




lola. Wl 54990-0001 




1 -800-272-5233 ext. 642 




FAX (71 5) 445-4087 





72 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




*, AolonrloK 



show calendar 



Note: Shows marked with an asterisk (*) have knives as the main focus. Events marked with two asterisks 
(**) are knifemaking seminars or symposiums, knife-throwing competitions, auctions, or other similar events. 
BLADE'S® "Show Calendar" also can be seen on BLADE'S website at www.blademag.com. 



JANUARY 



Jan. 20-22 Reno, NV ABS Exposition, Silver 
Legacy Hotel. Contact Jay Hendrickson 
301.663.6923 or Johnny Perry 864.592.0642.* 

Jan. 27-29 Lakeland, FL 28 th Annual Gator 
Cutlery Club Show, Lakeland Center. Contact 
Dan Piergallini 813.754.3908 or 813.967.1471.* 

Jan. 28-29 New Braunfels,TX Guadalupe Forge 
Winter Hammer-In & Knifemaker's Rendez- 
vous. Contact Johnny Stout 830.606.4067 
johnny@stoutknives.com, or Harvey Dean 
512.446.3111 dean@texl.net.** 

Jan. 28-29 St. Louis, MO Gateway Area Knife 
Club Show, Carpenters Hall. Contact Paul at 
314.241.6006 or Glenn at 636.300.1482.* 



FEBRUARY 



Feb. 4-5 Little Rock, AR 1 1 th Annual Arkansas 
Custom Knife Show, Robinson Center Exhibit 
Hall. Contact David Etchieson 501.472.8446 
aka@alliancecable.net.* 



Feb. 9-12 Las Vegas, NV Shooting, Hunting, 
Outdoor Trade (SHOT) Show, Las Vegas Conven- 
tion Center. Open to the retail trade only. Call 
800.388.8104 e-mail SHOT@ttgonline.com. 

Feb. 10-12 Las Vegas, NV Las Vegas Custom 
Knifemaker Show, Mandalay Bay. Contact 
Wallace Beinfeld, Dept. BL3, POB 2197, 
Cathedral City, CA 92234 760.202.4489 fax 
760.202.4793 lvcks.com.* 

Feb. 18-19 Napa Valley, CA The Collec- 
tors' Show, Silverado Resort & Coun- 
try Club. Contact John Green 530.637.5387 
collectorsshow@foothill.net, www.collectors- 
show.com.* 

Feb. 24-26 New York, NY 17 th Annual East 
Coast Custom Knife Show, Crowne Plaza 
Hotel. Contact Steve D'Lack, Dept. BL3, POB 
313, Turners, MO 65765 417.866.6688 fax 
417.866.6693 hg_inc@hotmail.com, www.ecck- 
show.com.* 

Feb. 24-26 Dayton, OH NKCA Dayton, Ohio, 
Show, Hara Arena. Contact the NKCA office at 
423.875.6009. 

Feb. 24-26 Pasadena, CA Southern California 
Blades Knife Expo 2006, Pasadena Conference 
Center. Call 818.368.7110 for more information.* 

Feb. 25 Wyoming, MI 2 nd Annual West Michi- 
gan Edge Show, K of C Hall. Contact West 
Michigan Promotions Ltd., 278 W. Cleve- 
land St., Dept. BL3, Coopersville, MI 49404 
616.837.7194.* 



Feb. 25-26 Lewisburg, PA 18 th Annual Keystone 
Blade Association Show, Country Cupboard Inn. 
Contact Marilyn Kepner 570.584.4835 or Skip 
Fryling 570.387.4955.* 



MARCH 



March 10-12 Dalton, GA NKCA Northwest 
Georgia Knife Show, Northwest Georgia Trade 
& Convention Center. Contact the NKCA 
423.875.6009.* 

March 18-19 Scottsdale, AZ 4 th Scottsdale 
Knife Collectors Show, Parada Expo Center. 
Contact Elliott Glasser, Dept. BL3, 7303 East 
Earl Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85251 480.945.0700 fax 
480.945.3333 USGRC@qwest.net.* 

March 24-26 Janesville, WI 23 rd Annual 
Badger Knife Show, Holiday Inn Express Janes- 
ville Conference Center. Contact Bob Schrap, 
Dept. BL3, POB 511, Elm Grove, WI 53122 
414.479.9765badgerknifeclub@aol.com.* 



APRIL 



April 7-9 Bessemer, AL Jim Batson/Alabama 
Forge Council Bladesmithing Symposium and 
Knife Show, Tannehill State Park. Contact Jim 
Batson, Dept. BL3, 176 Brentwood, Madison, AL 
35758 540.937.231 8 jbbatson@knology.net.**/* 

April 8-9 Eugene, OR 3 1 st Annual Oregon Knife 
Show, Lane County Convention Center. Contact 
the OKCA, POB 2091, Dept. BL3, Eugene, OR 
97402 541.484.5564 www.oregonknifeclub.org.* 

April 8-9 Bethalto, IL Bunker Hill Knife 
Show, Knights of Columbus Hall. Contact Mike 
Pellegrin 618.667.6777 mikepell@apci.net.* 

April 21-23 Shepherdsville, KY NKCA Shep- 
herdsville Spring Show, Paroquet Springs Confer- 
ence Centre. Contact the NKCA 423.875-6009.* 

April 22-23 Coquitlam, B.C., Canada The 

Vancouver Knife Show, Coquitlam Sports 
Complex. Contact Bob Patrick 604.538.6214 
bob@knivesonnet.com.* 

April 28-30 Novi, MI Wolverine Knife Collectors 
Club Show, a joint show with Michigan Antique 
Arms Club, New Rock Financial Showplace. 
Contact Pat Donovan 586.786.5549 or Frank 
Meek 586.264.2031 (evenings). 

April 28-30 Solvang, CA 22 nd Annual Solvang 
Custom Knife Show, Royal Scandinavian Inn. Call 
Nordic Knives 805.688.3612 fax 805.688.1635 
www.nordicknives.com. * 



MAY 



May 7-8 Tucson, AZ Tucson 3 rd Annual Knife 



Show, Tucson Convention Center. Contact Mike 
Griffin, Dept. BL3, 5301 E. Sahuaro Dr., Scotts- 
dale, AZ 85254 480.948.2961, or call Don Norris 
520.744.2494 or Ted Vance 520.275.0798.* 

May 13-14 Mystic, CT NCCA Annual Show, 
Hilton Mystic. Contact Caroline Levine 
978.375.0896 cklevine@att.net.* 

May 19-21 Springfield, MO NKCA Springfield 
Knife Show, in conjunction with RK Gun Show, 
Ozark Empire Fairgrounds. Contact the NKCA 
423.875.6009. 



JUNE 



June 3-4 Dover, OH 1 



,th 



Annual Western 



Reserve Cutlery Association Invitational Knife 
Expo, Tuscarawas County Fairgrounds. Contact 
D Musgrave, Dept. BL3, POB 355, Dover, OH 
44622 330.745.4242 dmusgrav@neo.rr.com, 
wrca-oh.com.* 

June 8-10 Pigeon Forge, TN Parkers' Greatest 
Knife Show on Earth #30, Grand Hotel Conven- 
tion Center. Contact PKCS, attn: B. Parker, Dept. 
BL3, 6715 Heritage Business Ct., Chattanooga, 
TN 37422 423.892.0448.* 

June 16-18 Atlanta, GA 25th Annual BLADE 
Show & International Cutlery Fair, Cobb Galleria 
Centre, 1-285 & US 4 1 , one exit off 1-75 across from 
the Cumberland Mall, adjacent to the Renaissance 
Waverly Hotel. The world's largest combined show 
of handmade, antique & factory knives. Over 664 
tables and 129 factory booths. Join the world's 
greatest national and international knifemakers, 
cutlery manufacturers, collectors, collections 
and knife lovers. Site of the Blade Magazine 
2006 Knife-Of-The-Year Awards® for factory 
knives, points for the 2006 BLADEhandmade™ 
Awards, Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Fame® induction & much more. Site of the 
annual ABS meeting and special Knifemakers' 
Guild section. Seminars include BLADE Show 
World Championship Cutting Competition and 
forging demos, how to collect, how to make, 
the latest materials, etc. Contact BLADE®, c/o 
K-ause Publications, 700 E. State, Iola, WI 54945 
715.445.2214 blademagazine@krause.com, www. 
bladeshow.com.* 

To ensure timely publication of your knife 
show in the "Show Calendar," BLADE® 
requests that you send all pertinent infor- 
mation concerning your show in written 
form — dates, locations, etc. — at least three 
months before the show takes place to 
F&W Publications, attn: J. Kertzman, 700 
E. State St., Iola, WI 54945 (715) 445- 
2214 fax (715) 445-4087. BLADE depends 
on the shows themselves for prompt and 
accurate information. 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 73 



Blade 

THE WORLD'S #1 KNIFE PUBLICATION « 

MAGAZINE CLASSIFIED 

HEADINGS AVAILABLE 

CLASSIFIED ADS 

Only 60 t per word 

Minimum charge is $9.00 per ad. 

800-942-0673 
CLASSIFIED FREQUENCY DISCOUNT 

(Consecutive Issues Only Of The Same Ad.) 
1-2 Issues No Discount; 3-6 Issues 15%; 7-12 Issues 20% 



ANTIQUE FACTORY KNIVES 

6010 American Knife Co. 

6020 Baldwin Cutlery Co. 

6025 Belknap Hardware Co. 

6030 Bertram (C) Cutlery Co. 

6035 Boker Germany 

6040 Boker USA 

6045 Bruckman (E) Cutlery 

6050 Bruckmann, Solingen 

6055 Burkinshaw Knife Co. 

6060 Camillus 

6065 Canton Cutlery Co. 

6070 Case Brothers 

6075 Cattaraugus 

6080 Central City Knife Co. 

6090 Christy Knife Co. 

6095 Colonial Cutlery Co. 

6100 Cripple Creek, USA 

6105 Diamond Edge 

6110 Eagle Pocket Knife Co. 

6120 Eye Brand Knives 

6125 George Wostenholm 

6130 Gerber Legendary 
Blade 



6135 Grohmann 

6140 Heimerdinger Cutlery Co. 

6150 Henry Sears 1865 

6175 John Primble, Belknap 

6200 Klaas, Robert 

6210 Lackawanna Cutlery Co. 

6225 Marble Arms & Manf Co. 

6235 Napanoch Knife Co. 

6254 Ontario Knife Co. 

6262 Pal Cutlery Co. 

6282 Russell Barlows 

6300 Utica 

6310 Wade & Butcher 

6325 Misc. Antique Factory 
Knives 

FACTORY BRANDS 

6340 Al Mar 

6380 Barteaux Machetes Inc. 

6390 Bear MGC 

6398 Benchmade 

6421 Blue Mountain 

Turquoise 
6424 Boker 
6448 Buck 



6466 Bulldog 

6476 C.A.S. Iberia Inc 

6480 Camillus 

6486 Case 

6492 Case Classics 

6510 Cold Steel 

6523 Columbia River 

Knife & Tool 
6530 Cripple Creek 
6580 Fairbairn-Sykes 
6586 Fight'n Rooster 
6614 Gerber 
6650 Henckels 
6660 IBCA/ABCA 
6700 Ka-Bar 
6766 Marble's 
6842 Puma 
6860 Queen 
6876 Remington 
6940 Smith & Wesson 
6944 Sog Specialty 
6952 Spyderco 
7000 Tops 
7040 Valley Forge 
7046 Victorinox 
7084 Winchester 
7090 Misc. Factory Brands 
KNIFE TYPES / PATTERNS 
7100 Advertising 
7126 Baseball Bat 
7132 Bayonets 
7138 Bolos 
7144 Boot 
7152 Bowies 
7158 Bowies (Antique) 
7180 Camp 
7232 Commemoratives/ 

Limited Editions 



7290 Diving 


8030 Goddard (Wayne) 


7322 Fighters 


8128 Holder (D') 


7334 Folding 


8188 Hudson (Robbin) 


7338 Folding (Multi-Blade) 


8348 Lile (Jimmy) 


7344 Fruit 


8400 Loveless (Bob) 


7374 Hunting (Folders) 


8450 Moran (Bill) 


7376 Hunting (Straight) 


8708 Randall 


7420 Machetes 


8788 Ruana (Rudy) 


7450 Navy 


8808 Scagel (William) 


7460 Office 


8880 Shadley (Eugene) 


7466 One-Hand 


8900 Smith (J.D.) 


7526 Razors 


8968 Terzuola (Robert) 


7532 Rifleman's 


9000 Tighe (Brian) 


7540 Scout 


9100 Walker (Michael) 


7546 Senator 


9150 Warenski (Buster) 


7576 Sog (Type) 


9170 Wile (Peter) 


7602 Swords 


9180 Yellowhorse (David) 


7622 Tool/Pliers 


9224 Miscellaneous 


7628 Toothpick 


Handmade 


7640 Trench 


MILITARY 


7650 Utility 


9310 Civil War 


7660 Wharncliffe 


9365 Korean 


7666 Whittler 


9405 Vietnam 


7674 Misc. Knife Types/ 


9432 WWI 


Patterns 


9445 WWII - German 


HANDMADES 




7718 Bartrug (Hugh) 


9450 WWII -Japanese 


7778 Bose (Tony) 


9465 WWII - USA 


7785 Boye (David) 
7792 Burke (Dan) 


9470 WWII -Miscellaneous 


9475 Miscellaneous Military 


7800 Centofante (Frank) 


MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS/ 


7818 Cooper (John Nelson) 


SERVICES 


7825 Corbit (Jerry) 


9680 Agency Wanted 


7888 Davis (Terry) 


9685 Appraisal Services 


7928 Emerson (Ernest) 


9690 Auction Services 


7958 Fisk (Jerry) 


9700 Books / Magazines / 


7980 Fowler (Ed) 


Videos 


8020 Gilbreath (Randall) 


9705 Buy /Sell /Trade 



9710 Catalogs /Mail Order 

Lists 

9712 Cigar Cutters 

9715 Collectible 

Advertisements 

9720 Collections 

9730 Dealers Wanted 

9735 Design Services 

9738 Distr Wanted 

9740 Engraving 

9750 Factory Reps Wanted 

9770 Handle Materials 

9780 Heat Treating 

9790 Knife Boxes / Containers 

9800 Knife Cases /Displays 

9810 Knife Clubs /Societies 

9825 Knife Rolls 

9840 Knifemaking Equipment 

9850 Knifemaking Instruction 

9875 Knifemaking Supplies 

9890 Knife Shops 

9895 Knife Shows 

9900 Leather /Sheaths 

9915 Manufacturers Wanted 

9924 Memorabilia (Knife) 

9935 Multiple Brands For Sale 

9936 Multiple Brands Wanted 
9938 Oils & Lubricants 
9940 Original Catalogs 
9945 Repair (Knife) 

9965 Sales /Auctions 

9975 Scrimshaw 

9980 Services, Miscellaneous 

9985 Sharpening/ 
Sharpeners 

9988 Show Cases 

9991 Steels 

9993 Tobacco Products 

9996 Miscellaneous Products 




BLADE 
LIST 



WANTED: CASE pocketknives especially 10 Dot and older. 
Check with Charlie before you sell. Call or write. Charlie 
Mattox, PO Box 1565, Gallatin, TN 37066. 1-877-520-9192, 
voice mail pager. Mobile phone 615-419-5669. 
Http://www.mattoxknife.com 



REMINGTON 



REMINGTON KNIVES: Bullets, Wildlife, commemoratives, 
anniversary issues all years. Product information and pricing. 
800-622-5120 daytime. 



LEE'S CUTLERY knives for work, sport, pleasure & collecting. 
For a wide variety of knives, check out www.leescutlery.com 

WANTED: ANY condition handmade knives; Randall, 
Scagel, Ruana, F.S. Richtig, Morseth, Bone, Cooper, 
Loveless, Moran, Lile, etc. Also military knives and 
pocketknives, watches. Send description and price to: 
Angelo Solino, 6 Wesley Court N, Huntington, NY 11743. 
631-423-1729. 



FOLDING 



CATALOGS/ MAIL ORDER 
LISTS 



CASE BROTHERS 



CUSTOM FOLDERS collection with unusual locking devices, 
large collection photos available. Good prices. 
LZB289@aol.com 



BUYING KNIVES: Case, Randalls, custom handmade and out- 
of-production. Years in business. Confidentially assured. 
Sensitive to estates. Please call 817-645-6008 anytime day/ 
night or e-mail delong@digitex.net 



SWORDS 



SUPERIOR SWORDS Indestructible. Simply The Best. 
bradyodom.com bradyodomswords@yahoo.com. Brady 
Odom Master Sword Maker 1-800-573-4005 28 



GROHMANN 



CANADA'S KNIFEZONE, premier online knife and sword 
store. 160 brands including Grohmann knives. 
www.knifezone.ca, 1-866-885-6433. 



LOVELESS (BOB) 



LOVELESS KNIVES wanted: Gordon White, PO Box 181, 
Cuthbert, GA 39840. 229-732-6982 anytime. 



ALMAR 



AL MAR Knives wanted by collector. 1 to 100. Also catalogs, 
price lists etc. Stu Shaw 772-285-3755. E-mail: 
stushaw@adelphia.net 



BUCK KNIVES on consignment. To sell or for list of knives to 
buy, call Larry Oden. 765-472-2323 wkday eves, or Sat. 
References available. 



OLDER CASE pocketknives for sale. XX, USA, 10 Dot and 
others. Clean outstanding knives with pretty handles. Please 
call or write for my list. Charlie Mattox, PO Box 1565, Gallatin, 
TN 37066. 1-877-520-9192, voice mail pager. Mobile phone 
615-419-5669. Http://www.mattoxknife.com 

74 /BLADE 



RUANA (RUDY) 



RUANA KNIVES-WANTED By long time collector. New knives 
or old knives with "M" stamp, small knife stamp or signature. 
No collection to small. Any condition. Call or write-Vincent 
Roberts, 300 Marshall LN SE, Cleveland, TN. 37323-(423- 
559-5168). or Email:Hillbillenigma@earthlink.net 



GREEN RIVER Knives, ivory micarta, buffalo horn, oak, with 
sheaths. Brochure $1 York Mountain Enterprises, RD2 Box 
272B Dept. B, Pittsfield, PA 16340. 

LIST OF over 600 automatic antique and modern knives. 
Including Case Zippers, Ka-Bar, Grizzly, Presto, Flylock, Case, 
Remington, Latama, Italian pick locks and many more 
brands. Send $5.00 refundable with first order. Skelton 
Enterprise, Jerry Skelton, 3795 Hwy. 188, Alamo, TN 38001. 
731-656-2443. Request list "S". 

OCCULT CATALOGS Spells, Charms, books, curio, and more! 
Get revenge! Send $5 to: Thorns Corner, PO Box 8028, 
Lewiston, ME 04243-8028. 

THROWING KNIFE catalog and instruction sheet sent free for 
SASE to: Tm-Balance Knife Co., PO Box 140555, Grand 
Rapids, Ml 49514. 

COLLECTOR KVIVES- Queen, Schatt & Morgan, Ka-Bar, 
Remington and Case. Send $2 for our catalog. S & S and 
Sons Cutlers, Po Box 501 A Lomita, CA 90717 PH 310-326- 
3869 or www.snsandsonscutlers.com. 



Hfflffl! 



SCAGEL KNIVES and axes wanted: Gordon White, PO Box 
181 , Cuthbert, GA 39840. 229-732-6982 anytime. 



9224 MISCELLANEOUS HANDMADE 



WANTED: SCAGEL, R.H. Ruana, Randall, Loveless, Morseth, 
Remington, and Marbles knives and axes. Any Heiser knife or 
axe sheaths. 229-732-6982, anytime. Gordon White, Box 
181, Cuthbert, GA 39840. 



COLLECTIBLE 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



NEW: COLLECTABLE Knives of Finland by Les Ristinen. 176 
pages, 40 with color text from 1 649 to 2005. Antique catalog 
reprints $35 +$5 postage. Check or MO. Suomi Shop, 17533 
Co Hwy 38, Frazee, MN 56544 218-538-6633. 



ENGRAVING 



BUY, SELL TRADE 



HAND ENGRAVING by Reid Smith. Over 17 years of 
professional experience. Call 704-846-4242 or visit me at 
www.RDSengravers.com 



ANVILS. WWW.OLDWORLDANVILLES.COM 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



HEAT TREATING 



OIL HARDENING/ zone and clay tempering- all steels. Lee 
Dates, PO Box 1391, LaPorte, TX 77572-1391. For prices 
http://www.bearclawknives.com 281 -587-6080. 



STEEL TANG Stamps: Mark your knives with your name, logo 
or design. Quality hand-cut hardened steel stamps made to 
your specifications. "If it's worth making, it's worth marking." 
Established 1898. Henry A. Evers, Corp. 72 Oxford St., 
Providence, Rl 02905. 800-553-8377. 



9790 KNIFE BOXES/ CONTAINERSH9890 



KNIFE SHOPS 



DISPLAY CASES: Oak, Walnut, wood, glass, standard or 
custom sizes. 28 page catalog. Send $1. Woodland Products, 
61292 CR 7, Elkhart, IN 46517. 



12 YEAR established knife business in North Carolina for 
sale. 919-460-0203 or email beckscutlery@mindspring.com 
Beck's Cutlery 



KNIFEMAKING SUPPLIES 



FOLDER SUPPLIES pivot pins, stainless and gold plated 
screws, titanium sheet. IBS Intl., R.B. Johnson, Box 11, 
Clearwater, MN 55320. 320-558-6128. 

http://www.cust.omkn ives.comr.b.johnson/ 

NORDIC KNIFE making supplies. The most extensive catalog 
of Scandinavian knife making supplies on the web. Hand 
forged custom Damascus blades from some of the finest 
bladesmiths in Europe, factory blades, curly birch, sheaths, 
exotic woods, tools, kits, knife making tips and more. Come 
to Brisa knife making supply of Finland for all of your knife 
making needs, http://www.brisa.fi 



LEATHER/ SHEATHS 



CUSTOM LEATHER Knife Sheaths in your design or mine. 
Write or call: Robert Schrap, 7024 W. Wells St., Wauwatosa, 
Wl 53213. 414-771-6472 evenings or knifesheaths@aol.com 

FINE FOLDERS deserve protection. Ron Lake and Mike 
Walker send their folders with one of these soft goatskin, 
ultrasuede lined slips. Six sizes for pocket or belt. Arne 
Mason, 258 Wimer, Ashland, OR 97520. 541-482-2260, 
www.arnemason.com 



SCRIMSHAW 



CUSTOM SCRIMSHAW by Juanita Rae Conover. Single or full 
color. Wildlife a specialty. Exceptional quality. Call for sample 
pictures and turn around information. PO Box 70442, 
Eugene, OR 97401, 541-747-1726 or 

juanitaraeconover@yahoo.com 

SCRIMSHAW, RELIEF carving, 3D carving, in business since 
1979, timbeersscrimshaw@hotmail.com 607-467-3961, 
http:// home.twcny.rr.com/sixth pacavalry/scrimshaw.htm 



9996 MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 



ATTENTION CUT-OUT coin jewelry, coin buckles, inserts, bolo 
ties, chains, holders, tie-tacks, key chains, money clips, 
jewelry components. Great money maker. Catalog $1. 
Bernard Myles, 1605 S 7th St, Terre Haute, IN 47802. 812- 
232-4405. 

CUTTING EDGE Outdoor Goods- Knives, Multi-Tools, GPS, 
Binoculars, MORE! Name Brands. $2.95 Shipping! 
www.goldrushtradingpost.com 

NORTHWEST KNIVES, www.nwknives.com 800-611-8849, 
Antique, custom, military, factory, swords- we've got it all. 
Free Catalog! 



c 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



3 



A.G. Russell Knives, Inc 16 

Al Mar Knives 106 

American Bladesmith Society 72 

American Edge 71 

American Knife Making Supply 

118 

Arizona Custom Knives . . .120 
Arkansas Custom Knife Show63 
Atlanta Cutlery 131 

B 

Badger Knife Club 106 

Banyan Bay Inc 54 

Barr, A 69 

Beckwith's Blades 119 

Beinfeld Productions 35 

Best Knives 48 

Blade Art 89 

Blade Show 2006 99 

Blade Show West 56 

Blade-Tech Ind 59 

Bladegallery.com 112 

Blue Ridge Knives 30, 68 

Bob Dozier Knives 54 

Bob Neal Custom Knives . . .92 

BokerUSA 19 

Bonds House Of Cutlery 56 

Bowie Corporation 67 

Bradley's Blades 48 

Briar Custom Knives 8 

Buckeye Engraving 92 

Bunker Hill Knife Club 71 

Burger Knives 86 

Busse Combat Knife Co. . . .41 

C 

C.A.S. Iberia 29,132 

Camillus Cutlery Co 36 

Canadian Knifemakers Guild .64 

Carlson, Kelly 48 

Center Cross Video 69 

Chopra Deepak 85 

Chris Reeve Knives 14 



Clem & Co 31 

Cliff Parker Knives 28 

Collectibles Insurance Agency 

55 

Collector's Show 57,120 

Columbia River 15,43 

Cox, Colin 59 

Crawford, Pat 48 

Custom Knife Company ... .39 

Custom Shoppe, LLC 55 

Cutting Edge Cutlery 40 

D 

Davidson, Edmund 72 

Denton, JW 66 

Diamond Machining Technology 

112 

Dorris Wood Creations 40 

E 

Edgecraft Corporation ... .118 
Elen Hunting & Importing Inc. 

65 

Elishewitz Custom Knives . .62 
Ellis, David 127 

F 

Faust, Dick 68 

Finer Points 44, 124 

Fowler, Ed 60 

Frost Cutlery 110 

G 

G.L. Pearce Abrasive Co. . . .67 

Gary Levine Fine Knives 39 

George Trout 71 

Giraffebone.com 126 

Glendo Corp 47 

Grohmann Knives Ltd 87 

Guild, Don 52 

H 

Halpern Titanium 71 

Hanson, Don 49 

Harrison, Dan 126 



Hawkins Knife Making Supplies 

49 

Henry Evers Corp 86 

Hideawayknife.com 97 

I 

Idaho Knife Works 69 

J 

Jantz Supply 121 

Jim's Cutlery Company ... .82 

Joy Enterprises 89 

JT's Knife Shop 69 

K 

Kayne Custom Hardware Inc. 

70 

Kellam Knives Co 123 

Kencrest/Hara 70,111 

Kershaw Knives ...21,33,103 
Knife & Gun Finishing Supplies 

96 

Knife Center Of The Internet .62 

Knife Mart 81,87,95,97 

Knifekits.com 61 

Knifeshows.com 62 

Knights Edge Ltd 3 

Knives Plus 40 

L 

Lambert, Kirby 92 

Lansky Sharpeners 53 

Legendaryknifemakers.com 115 

Lightfoot Knives 39 

Lone Star Wholesale 96 

Lone Wolf Knives 45 

M 

Magnum USA 70 

Marlowe, Charles 69 

Masecraft Supply 82 

Master Cutlery 124 

Master Knifemaker's 105 

Masters Of Defense Knife Co. 

115 

Meyerco 9 



Midwest Gun Exchange . . .113 

Moki Knife Company 52 

Mooney, Mike 66 

Moteng International Inc. . .22 
Mother Of Pearl Company 

44,109 

Myknifedealer.com 96 

N 

N.I.C.A 23 

National Knife Distributors . .70 

NC Tool Company 71 

Neilson's Mountain Hollow 115 

nemesis Knives 66 

New Graham Knives 25 

Nittinger Knives 72 

Nordic Knives 83 



Ohare Knives 72 

Ontario Knife/Queen Cutlery 

7,125 

Osborne, Warren 117 

OSO Grande Knife & Tool ..105 

P 

Paragon Industries 98 

Paragon Sporting Goods ..105 
Parker's Knife Collector Service 

53 

Peter's Heat Treating Inc. ..91 
Pietro Rosa Due Buoi Snc . .28 

Plaza Cutlery 125 

Pro Cut 5,104 

R 

Randall Made Knives 66 

Red Hill Corporation 98 

Riverside Machine 68 

Root, Gary 69 

Ruko LLC 26 

S 

Seto Cutlery 68 

Sheffield Knifemaker's Supply 
67 



Shenandoah Valley Knife 

Collectors 66 

Simbatec 67 

Simonich Knives, LLC 40 

Smoky Mountain Knife Works 

Inc 47 

SOG Specialty Knives Inc. . .27 

Solvang Knife Show 34 

Southern California Blades . .46 
Steel Addiction Custom Knives 

92 

Strider Knives 37 

Swinguard's Custom Knife Sale 

57 

Switchblade King 109 

Szilaski, Joseph 62 

T 

Taylor Cutlery 28 

Texas Knife Outfitters 117 

Texas Knifemakers Supply . .17 

Tighe, Brian 39 

Tippmann Industrial Products 

119 

Toolshop 66 

Tops.... 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72 

Trident Knives 46 

Tru-Grit 83 

Tru-Hone Corporation 68 

True North Knives 8 

Tulsa Gun Show Inc 63 

Twin Blades 110 

Two Guys Show Promotions 67 

U 

United Cutlery 11 

V 

Vagnino, Michael 71 

W 

W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. 2 

White, John 49 

William Henry Knives 5 

Willy B. Custom 93 

Wilson Tactical 49 



The advertisers' index is provided as a reader service. Occasional last-minute changes may result in ads appearing on pages other than those listed here. 

The publisher assumes no liability for omissions or errors. 



MARCH 2006 blademag.com 



BLADE/ 75 




/hat's new 



Utility Folders Now 
Come Camouflaged 

Sheffield's Camouflage Quick Change 
Utility Knife is like a one-hand-open- 
ing folder, but with replaceable util- 
ity knife blades and a camouflage handle. 

For more information contact Sheffield 
Mfg., attn: S. Maltese, Dept. BL3, 165 E. 
2nd St., Mineola, NY 11501 800.457.0600. 




Beauchamp Builds 
Fancy Push Dagger 

Gaetan Beauchamp fashions a 
fancy push dagger showcasing a 
stainless-damascus blade and a 
mammoth-ivory handle. 

For more information contact Gaetan 
Beauchamp, Dept. BL3, 125, de la 
Rivire, Stoneham, PQ, Canada G0A 4P0 
418.848.1914 www.beauchamp.cjb.net. 




Knife Sports Blue & 
Black G- 10 Handle 



E! 



I d Caffrey's "Progression II" folder 

sports a 3-inch 52100 blade and a 

I blue-and-black G-10 handle. 

For more information contact Ed 

Caffrey, Dept. BL3, 2608 Central Ave. W, 

Great Falls, MT 59404 406.727.9102. 




Frame-Lock Folder 
Dons 420 J2 Blade 

esigned by Chad Los Banos, the 
Boker Subcom F frame-lock folder 
dons a 1 7/8-inch 420 J2 blade and 
a nylon-reinforced, textured handle. 

For more information contact Boker, 
attn: C. Hoffman, Dept. BL3, 1550 Balsam 
St., Lakewood, CO 80214 303.462.0662. 





Double-Action Auto 
Comes In Cocobolo 

Lone Wolf's newest double-action auto- 
matic is available with a 3-inch CPM 
S30V blade and G-10, cocobolo or 
fiberglass-filled-nylon handle choices. 

For more information contact Lone Wolf 
Knives, attn: D. Hutchens, Dept. BL3, 9373 
S.W. Barber St., Ste. A, Wilsonville, OR 
97070 503.431.6777. 




Two-Blade Folder 
Features Ivory Grip 

J.B. Moore offers a two-blade folder 
with a double-pinned ivory handle 
and stainless steel bolsters. 
For more information contact J.B. 
Moore, Dept. BL3, 1707 N. Gillis, Ft. 
Stockton, TX 79735 915.336.21 13. 




76 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



what s new 

what s new 

Hatchet Boasts S-7 
Tool Steel Head 

Knives Of Alaska offers the Hunter's 
Hatchet sporting a hickory handle, 
an S-7 tool steel head with a 2 1/2- 
inch cutting edge, and a leather sheath. 

For more information contact Knives 
Of Alaska, attn: C. Allen, Dept. BL3, 
3100 Airport Dr., Denison, TX 75020 
800.572.0980. 




11 



,rr 



Mega Chopper' 
Has 1 6-Inch Blade 

Ivan Campos delivers the "Mega Chop- 
per," a long knife including a 16-inch 
5160 blade and a ray-skin-wrapped, 
black-jacaranda-wood handle. 

For more information contact Ivan 
Campos, Dept. BL3, R. Stelio M. 
Loureiro, 206, Tatui, SP, Brazil 18270-810 
00.55.15.33056867ivan@bladebazar.com. 




Crown Stag Crowns 
Scagel-Style Knife 

Lora Sue Bethke's William Scagel- 
style fixed blade sports a 4-inch 
blade, and a crown-stag, leather, brass 
and nickel-silver handle. 

For more information contact Lora Sue 
Bethke, Dept. BL3, 13420 Lincoln, Grand 
Haven, MI 49417 616.842.8268. 




Leaf Springs Assist 
A-OK Blades Open 

The newest Blackie Collins-designed 
Meyerco A-OK assisted-opening fold- 
ers utilize leaf springs to assist the 
440C blades into the open position. 

For more information contact Meyerco, 
attn: D. Clark, Dept. BL3, 4481 Exchange 
Service Dr., Dallas, TX 75236 214.467.8949. 




Book Highlights 
Randall Fighters 

Turner Publishing Offers Randall Mili- 
tary Models by Robert E. Hunt, a full- 
color book detailing Randall military 
fighters, bowies and other full-tang knives. 

For more information contact Turner 
Publishing, attn: C. Harris, Dept. BL3, POB 
3101, Paducah, KY 42002 270.443.0121. 




Bowie Knife Grip 
Carved With Eagle 

Tommy McNabb's damascus bowie 
showcases a stag handle carved with 
an image of an eagle and comple- 
mented by an amber spacer. 

For more information contact Tommy 
McNabb, Dept. BL3, 4015 Brownsboro Rd., 
Winston-Salem, NC 27106 336.924.6053. 




MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 77 




naker 

r showca. — 

sn 



rcase 





knifemaker sh 



"Knifemaker Showcase" spotlights the photographs of knives sent by any and all custom knifemakers to BLADE® for filing in the Knifemakers Archive. The 

Knifemakers Archive is the most complete collection of knifemakers' knives and information in the world. If you are a custom knifemaker and have not sent 

us a photo (the better quality the photo, the better chance it has of getting in the magazine), write to: BLADE, c/o Krause Publications, 700 E. State, lola, 

Wl 54990 blademagazine@krause.com. Please include a close-up mug shot of yourself with your knife picture. 



Carl N. Smith 

"At 16 years old, while working summers in a blacksmith 
shop during World War II, I made my first knife out of an old 
car spring," Carl N. Smith notes. "Since then, my passion for 
knifemaking has grown." After retiring from the civil service 
in 1985, Smith honed his skills. "My desire to better my craft 
took over," he says. "This passion has been passed down 
to my sons and grandsons, which 
brings joy to my heart." The knife 
(left) sports a 1084 blade engraved 
with a bear scene by Smith's daugh- 
ter, Janet Raspberry, an elk-horn 
handle, brass guard, and red and 
turquoise spacers. Smith's list price: 
$350. His address: Dept. BL3, 3082 
W 1050 N, West Point, UT 84015 
801.776.3669. (Hoffman photo) 



Michael 
Rader 

Although Michael Rader 
admits to being inspired 
and influenced by many 
cultural styles of swords, 
he attempts to create singular designs that do not adhere to traditional models. 
"Most of my blades are damascus, and I heat treat them with high/low-temp salts," 
he says. "I also make matching hardwood handles and lined scabbards. I owe thanks 
to Lyle Brunkhorst, who has allowed me access to his press, surface grinder and 
Bridgeport mill over the past year. Lyle asked me to be a regular guest instructor 
at his twice-annual Northwest Hammer-In." The non-traditional long tanto (above) 
dons a 1084 blade, stainless steel guard and a maple handle. Rader's list price for a 
similar piece: $800-$ 1,000. His address: Dept. BL3, POB 698, Sumner, WA 98390 
253.255.7064 www.raderblade.com. (BladeGallery.com photo) 




Dave Dodds 



Thirty-five years ago, Dave Dodds 
found a book by Sid Latham titled 
Knives and Knifemakers that 
featured knives, among others, by 
Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famere Bob Loveless, Ted Dowell, 
Corbet Sigman, Bob Dozier and 
a bowie by R.W Wilson. "Wilson 
lived 35 miles from me. I called him and three days later 
I knew how to make a knife. It is the execution that has 
taken 35 years to perfect, and I'm still working on it," 
Dodds notes. He says a 440C blade coupled with a beau- 
tiful piece of stabilized wood makes a fine, good-looking 
hunting knife. The 440C hunter (right) features an ivory 
handle and decorative pins in the blade. Dodds 's list price: 
$365. His address: Dept. BL3, Rt. 1, Box 157, Beling- 
ton, WV 26250 304.823.3503. (Point Seven photo) 

78 / BLADE 




Dr. Jim Lucie 




When noted knifemaker and 
Blade Magazine Cutlery 
Hall-Of-Famere William 
Scagel passed away in 1963, 
Dr. Jim Lucie, Scagel's 
friend and personal physi- 
cian, procured most of his 
hand tools and supplies. "I 
was angry at myself for not 
having paid more attention 
to how Scagel made knives," Lucie 
says. "During my visits with him in 
the late 1950s and early '60s, I had 
no interest in knives, but was fasci- 
nated, instead, with his remark- 
able intelligence and wide areas 
of interest." Lucie later commit- 
ted himself to making Scagel-style 
knives. An ABS journeyman smith, 
he employs coal and gas forges and says he prefers a Bob 
Dozier grinder, as well as "the old reliable Bader." "I have 
helped several knifemakers get started on making Scagel-style 
knives — a great tribute to the old master," Lucie says. The 
Scagel-style bird-and-trout knife (above) parades a 4 3/4-inch 
5160 blade, a stacked-leather handle with original Scagel 
spacers and a Michigan whitetail buttcap. Lucie's list price: 
$950. His address: Dept. BL3, 4191 E. Fruitport Rd., Fruit- 
port, MI 49415 231.865.6390 scagel@netonecom.net. 



Darrel Ralph 



"While I make hi-tech modern knives, I draw inspiration from the clas- 
sics. Patterns like the balisong knife endure because of their superior 
functionality," Darrel Ralph says. "I work to make my knives as func- 
tional as those." Ralph's shop is open to anyone who loves knives and 
wants to see how he and his son, Ryan Bailey, make them. "Ryan has 
come to work with me after completing a four-year apprenticeship," he 
notes. The VII Venturi dagger-style butterfly knife 
(below) parades a carbo-nitride-coated CPM S30V 
blade with a flame pattern, and titanium handles 
filed in twist patterns. 
Ralph's list price: $650. His 
address: Dept. BL3, 4185 S. 
State Rt. 605, Galena, OH 
43021 740.965.9970 www. 
darrelralph.com. (SharpBy- 
Coop.com photo) 




"I lost a knife and couldn't find the same style, so I read an 

article in a magazine and decided to give knifemaking a try," 

Mel Fassio relates. From those humble beginnings in the early 

1970s, Fassio has branched out into building folding knives and 

studying engraving. "I studied engraving to make my knives 

the best I could," Fassio, a member of the Montana Knifemakers Association, says. 

Depending on the engraving and handle materials, Fassio 's list prices for folders fall 

between $150 and $450. The folder (above) showcases a 2 7/8-inch, engraved ATS- 

34 blade, engraved 416 stainless steel bolsters and a blue-bark-mammoth-ivory 

handle. Fassio's list price: $450. His address: Dept. BL3, 420 Tyler Way, Lolo, MT 

59847 406.273.9143. (Custom Knife Gallery of Colorado photo) 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 79 




'question & 

question & answer 

answer 



By Wayne Goddard 
BLADE® field editor 



File It Under Experience 
And Experimentation 

The author talks his approach to filework, multiple 
edge quenching swords and a different kind of anvil 



1: I have spent only three years making 
knives as a hobby, so some things remain 
a puzzle to me. One of them is the process 
of polishing filework. When I say polish- 
ing, I mean from file to 5,000-grit silicon 
carbide. It is frustrating enough to hand 



rub a finish on the flat of the blade. Since 
I am about to go insane with the amount 
of time involved in the process, 1 have 
concluded that someone has invented an 
easier method of polishing filework than 
wrapping sandpaper around files, if only 



to retain his/her sanity. Are you aware 
of any tricks in this area? Your filework 
seems to be flawless. If you would share 
the solution with me I would be grateful. 
Another question plagues me: Is it 
possible to multiple edge quench a medi- 



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ILLUSTRATION 1 The filework sampler shows practice work the 
author has done while experimenting with different patterns. At the 

80 / BLADE 



bottom is a portion of a knife he made in 1964 exhibiting decorative 
cuts executed with a grinding wheel. (Goddard illustration) 



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4 combination of filework styles graces the spine ofJ.D. Smith's large Persian folder 
in a blade of a twisted multi-billet "W"-pattern damascus and three-color mokume 
bolsters. His address: 69 Highland, Dept. BL3, Roxbury, MA 02119 617.969.0723 
jdsmith02115@verizon.net. (SharpByCoop.com photo) 



eval bastard sword and, if so, do you 
think that it would improve the perfor- 
mance of the blade? My concern is that 
stress may build up along the center of 
the blade, as it is soft while both edges 
are hardened, causing it to warp after 
tempering. 

Anyway, I have a tip for you before 1 
go. I have found that, for use as an anvil, 
a piece of railroad rail properly mounted 
with multiple supports made of angle 
iron bolted to the stump and welded to 
the railroad rail diagonally can be much 
more efficient sitting on end than it ever 
would be sitting horizontally. The reason 
for this is the fact that all the weight of 
the steel is under one 4x2. 5-inch spot. 
It works well for me and perhaps you 
may want to try it. (Matthew Marting, 
Missouri) 

I did not have anyone to teach me when I 
first tried to do filework in 1964. I did not 
even know what good filework looked like 
until some time later; most of what I had 
seen was on old knives. Back then I was a 
tool grinder by trade and used many differ- 
ent types and shapes of grinding wheels in 
the sharpening process. It was quite natural 
to use grinding wheels for the first filework 
I did. Because I did not use files, I guess 
it would be called grinding-wheel work 
instead. (For an example of grinding-wheel 
work, see the filework sample at the bottom 
of Illustration 1.) 

As time passed, I experimented with a 
combination of a grinding wheel and files 
until I developed my own style of filework. 
Ninety-five percent of the work with files 
is done with one round and one sharp "V" 
The sharp "V" is simply a triangular file 



that is prepared for filework by grinding 
the teeth from one side of a triangular file. 
This makes the "V" cut a lot sharper than 
can be achieved with the file the way it 
comes from the manufacturer. (Again, see 
Illustration 1.) 

I still use a narrow abrasive wheel 
on a bench grinder to establish the basic 
pattern of the parts of the filework that 
will be finished with the round file. I do 
very little layout work but rely on eye-hand 
coordination to establish the spacing of the 



"Ninety-five per- 
cent of the work 
with files is done 
with one round 
and one sharp 'V. 
— the author 



??? 



file cuts. With the rope-type patterns I will 
usually lay out the angle on the first cuts in 
order to get it right. The filework is not as 
uniform when doing it this way but I like it 
because it seems more natural. Plants and 
trees are not symmetrical; that is a part of 
nature. I could use my surface grinder or 
milling machine to cut a perfect pattern, 
but that would not be any fun. Or, worse 
yet, a machine with a computer for a brain 
could do it. 

I use strips of brass stock, wood or 
plastic with the proper shape to back up 
wet or dry paper for polishing the narrow 



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"V" file cuts. They are 8 inches long and 
about 1 3/8 inches wide and I call them 
back-up sticks. Some of the brass strips 
are outfitted with brass or mild-steel 
round stock soldered onto the edge. There 
is a back-up stick for every size of round 
file that I use. On occasion, I use the 
back-up sticks for the fine finishing of 
blade or handle details. (See Illustration 
2.) I hold the wet or dry paper on the 
brass strip and work out the coarse marks 
made by the file. I usually do not go any 
finer than 600 grit and then buff with a 
loose buff. The sharp lines do not get any 
polishing. 

Felt buffs and the rubber-bonded 
polishing wheels of the proper shape can 
be used for smoothing up the filework. 
When I do the vine pattern, I buff it fairly 
heavily to create a slightly rounded edge. 
The visual effect changes quite a bit after 
the buffing. 

"There is a back- 
up stick for every 
size of round file 
that I use." 

— the author 

Before embellishing a "real" knife, 
practice whatever the type of decoration 
may be on scrap material until you become 
proficient at it. I practice and experiment 
with new filework patterns by cutting them 
on the edge of a piece of scrap steel. I 
have collected the patterns over the years 
and bolted them together to make the 
display piece you see in Illustration 1 . They 
serve as a record of completed patterns 
and also help me remember how I made 
a certain pattern. Some of the patterns are 
incomplete; others, for obvious reasons, I 
have never used on a knife. 

As for the second part of your question, 
I see no reason to multiple quench a sword 
blade. My opinion of a sword is that, first 
and foremost, it must be unbreakable, and 
that can be achieved with a single quench. 
Quenching the whole blade and following it 
with a triple temper is more than adequate. 
My idea of the perfect sword it to make it 
as much like a good spring as possible. 

A single-edge sword can be edge 
quenched, or hardened with a clay-back 
process as per the Japanese swordmakers. 
The Japanese method is to coat the back of 
the blade with clay, then use a hot fire to 
quickly bring the edge up to the hardening 



82 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




ILLUSTRATION 2 These are the push 
sticks for backing up wet or dry paper. 
The ones numbered 1, 3, 4 and 5 are for 
round cuts; the number 2 is for "V" cuts. 
(Goddard illustration) 

temperature before the back has a chance 
to get hot. The first clay-back quench I did 
resulted in an almost fully hardened blade. 
This was because my fire was so slow heat- 
ing that the clay back became hot enough 
that the 90 percent of the steel under the 
clay hardened along with the edge. 

An excellent source for information 
on all aspects of swordmaking is Sword 
Forum International. The address: Sword 
Forum International, 1225 West Main St., 
Ste. 101-123, Mesa, AZ 85201-7033 http:// 
swordforum.com. 

Concerning the railroad-rail anvil, you 
are exactly right. It makes a noisy and inef- 
ficient anvil when used with the rail side up. 
John Brown, a friend of mine from Tucson, 
Arizona, reported the use of a piece of rail 
set on its end some years ago, and that is 
where I got the idea for my post anvil. The 
name is appropriate because of the similar- 
ity to a fence post. The post anvil is a bunch 
of heavy steel and forklift-fork pieces. The 
total weight is 285 pounds with a face that 
is 4x5 inches. This type anvil is very solid 
feeling under heavy hammer blows and 
there is no obnoxious ringing noise. 

The only thing that I have found lack- 
ing in my post anvil is a hardie hole. A hot- 
cut hardie and spring fuller are essential for 
the way that I work. If I ever make another 
post-type anvil, it will have a hardie hole. 

Send your questions for Wayne Goddard 
or Joe Szilaski to BLADE®, P.O. 
Box 789, Ooltewah, TN 37363-0789 
blademagazine@krause.com. Include an 
SASE with your full name and where you 
live for a personal response from Wayne, or 
e-mail him at wgoddard44@comcast.net. If 
you would rather e-mail your question (s) to 
Joe, his e-mail address is joe@szilaski.com. 
If you wish, BLADE will not print your 
name, city and state with your question. 



MARCH 2006 



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a m 



review 







Th iYearoF 



It was a monumental 12 months in the knife industry, 
and BLADE was there to document it all 



By BLADE® staff 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Editor's note: Each of the following 
vignettes is headed by 1) the actual month 
in which most of the events occurred and/ 
or 2) the issue in which the events were 
reported. Where applicable, each subject is 
followed by the page number of the issue in 
which the related story appeared. 




Month: JAN. '05 Issue: MARCH '05 

Newsmakers: Taylor Cutlery, Smoky 
Mountain Knife Works, Blue Ridge 
Knives and United Cutlery are the big 
winners in the Schrade auction (p. 20). 
Trends: Knives with wild grinds (p. 
12); knifemakers to watch in 2005 (p. 
42); folders with unusual mechanisms (p. 
126). Cutting Competitions: Dan Farr, 
Reggie Barker, Dickie Robinson, Adam 
Des Rosiers, Ray Kirk and Dan Winkler 
lead in qualifying for the ABS World 
Championships (p. 98). Knife Awards: 
The 2004 BLADEhandmade™ Awards (p. 
108). How-Tos: A three-part series on how 
to make stone knife handles begins (p. 24). 
Deaths In The Family: Blade Magazine 
Cutlery Hall-Of-Famers® Butch Winter (p. 
10) and Jim Parker (p. 85), purveyor Gary 
Shaw (p. 10), ABS master smith Scott Taylor 
(p. 32), and knifemaker Jerry Grice (p. 85). 
Cover Knife: R.J. Martin's Rampage. 




Month: FEB. '05 Issue: APRIL '05 

Newsmakers: Shortly before the 60"' 
anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima, 
the family of the late Clarence Garrett 
recognizes his likeness in the picture of the 
Marines landing on Iwo Jima in Ka-Bar's 
"Ka-Bar Was There" ad (p. 12). Trends: 
Vest bowies (p. 20); rescue knives (p. 50); 
small fixed blades as the best everyday- 
carry survival knives (p. 1 14). Knife Test: 
How hollow-, flat-, light-convex- and 
medium-convex-ground blades stack up 
(p. 34); SOG Trident TF-2 (p. 72). Hot 
Maker: Allen Elishewitz (p. 42). Hot 
Knife Company: Browning (p. 66). How- 
To: Get fine grain structure in L-6 (p. 90). 



Knifemaking Equipment: A two-part 
series on the latest grinders begins (p. 94). 
Cover Knife: Ka-Bar's 60 th Anniversary 
Iwo Jima Commemorative. 




Month: MARCH '05 Issue: MAY '05 

Trends: Knives with open-frame 
handles (p. 12); upscale tactical folders (p. 
42). Newsmakers: Fallkniven is for sale 
(p. 120). Knife Values: How to know how 
much to pay for a handmade (p. 50). Using 
Knives: Best knives for the cold and wet 
(p. 26). Swords: A two-part series on the 
swords of the Vikings begins (p. 64). Knife 
Safety: The do's and don'ts of lanyards (p. 
70). Knife Terminology: Stress risers (p. 
105). Antique Pocketknives: A two-part 
series on the top 10 advertising knives 
of all time begins (p. 96). Hot Makers: 
Kevin and Heather Harvey (p. 20). Hot 
Knife Company: Lakota Knife, USA 
(p. 34). Cover Knife: Grant and Gavin 
Hawk's E.T. 




Month: APRIL '05 Issue: JUNE '05 

Newsmakers: BLADE Show West 
announces move to Portland, Oregon (p. 
10); the latest in factory knives from the 
SHOT Show (part one of two) (p. 12); 
gun companies/concerns Sigarms, NRA 
Outdoors and Heckler & Koch introduce 
knife lines (p. 16). Trends: "Pimp My 
Knife" — the customizing of factory knives 
or "hand-finishing" of kit knives (p. 26). 
Soldiers' Knives: The factory knives 
active-duty personnel carry most in Iraq 
(p. 42). Knife Materials: "Does Brass 
Really Have No Class?" (p. 60). Knife 
Legend: Jimmy Fikes (p. 108). Knife Test: 
David Dempsey's D-Bowie (p. 72). Knife 
Maintenance: How to maintain your knife 
and sheath (p. 96). Sharpeners: Sharpeners 
for every setting (p. 116). Hot Makers: 
Gail and Larry Lunn (p. 20). Hot Knife 
Company: Knights Edge (p. 66). Cover 
Knife: The Spyderco/Kershaw Spyker. 



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BLADE / 85 




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Month: MAY '05 Issue: JULY '05 

Newsmakers: First Nations Knives, a 
new knife company in Ellicottville, New York, 
debuts (p. 106); BLADE salutes Jim Pugh, 
Cleston Sinyard and Glenn Marshall — all 
honed their knifemaking skills in World War II 
and continue to make knives (p. 1 10). Trends: 
Top 10 most collected new knifemakers (p. 
12). Swords: Museum Replicas' repros of the 
swords from the movie, Kingdom of Heaven© 
(p. 26); Japanese swords made in the historic 
tradition (p. 50). How-To: Maximize your 
BLADE Show experience (p. 60); cut blade 
blanks with an oxy-acetylene torch (p. 100). 
Knife Accessories: The latest cases for 
carrying/storing knives (p. 72). Knife Test: 
Brian Goode's Companion (p. 104). Hot 
Makers: David and Jerome Anders (p. 34). 
Hot Knife Company: Kopromed (p. 20). 
Death In The Family: Mick Koval (p. 106). 
Cover Blade: Museum Replicas' repro of the 
Sword of Ibelin from Kingdom of Heaven©. 




Month: JUNE '05 Issue: AUG. '05 

Newsmakers: Smoky Mountain Knife 
Works institutes "A Knife For A Solider" 
program for active-duty personnel (p. 
78); Victorinox buys Wenger (p. 79); the 
number of collectors of handmade knives 
and what they spend on knives (p. 138). 
Trends: Toast-cutters (p. 50); knives to 
take on vacation (p. 92); factory knives that 
will debut at the BLADE Show (p. 132). 
How-To: Wrap a Japanese-style handle (p. 
124). Cutting Competitions: Adam Des 
Rosiers wins at the Batson Bladesmithing 
Symposium to qualify, along with Reggie 
Barker, Dan Farr, Dickie Robinson and 
Daniel Winkler, for the ABS World 
Championships (p. 12). Knife Legend: 
Al Mar (p. 42). Collector Profile: Logan 
Sewell (part one of two) (p. 82). Soldiers' 
Knives: Sgt. Matt Gordham uses his Lone 
Wolf Harsey Tactical Folder on active duty 
in Iraq (p. 72). Hot Maker: Kenneth King 



(p. 22). Hot Knife Company: CAS/Hanwei 
(p. 152). Cover Knife: Wilson Tactical 
Model 11. 




Month: JULY '05 Issue: SEPT. '05 

Trends: The latest in butterfly knives 
(p. 66). Soldiers' Knives: Tomahawks 
and axes gain favor among active-duty 
personnel (p. 12). Knife Mechanisms: 
The latest in safeties for factory folders 
(p. 42). How-To: Make steel from dirt 
(part one of two) (p. 72); "Practical Buffer 
Safety" (part one of three) (p. 94). Knife 
Test: William Henry Knives Titan (p. 
98). Antique Pocketknives: "Peanuts: 
Emerging From Their Shell?" (p. 100). 
Knife Embellishment: Fancy filework (p. 
110). Knife Opinion: "Should D.E. Henry 
Be In The Cutlery Hall Of Fame©?" (p. 50). 
Collector Profile: Paul Lansingh (p. 26). 
Hot Engraver: Julie Warenski (p. 32). New 
Knife Book: BLADE'S Guide To Making 
Knives (p. 20). Cover Piece: Strider Knives' 
crash/breacher's axe. 




Month: AUG. '05 Issue: OCT. '05 

Newsmakers: At 108,000 square 
feet, 664 tables and 129 factory booths, 
the BLADE Show is the largest all-knife 
show ever (p. 22); Buck opens its new 
manufacturing plant in Post Falls, Idaho 
(p. 88). New Knives: The factory knives 
that debuted at the BLADE Show (p. 42). 
Collecting: Taiwan: the next great market 
for handmade knives? (p. 32). How-To: 
Keep your blades from warping during 
forging and heat treating (p. 78); pick the 
best using folder (p. 92). Knife Awards: The 
Blade Magazine 2005 Knife-Of-The-Year 
Awards® (p. 12). Cutting Competition: 
Reggie Barker defends his title in the ABS 
World Championship Cutting Competition 
at the BLADE Show (p. 102). Blade 
Magazine Cutlery Hall Of Fame©: George 
"Butch" Winter is enshrined posthumously. 
Cover Knife: Ken Steigerwalt/Ron Skaggs' 
Art Deco folder collaboration. 



86 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Month: SEPT. '05 Issue: NOV. '05 

Trends: Hottest knives of the hottest 
makers (p. 12); the newest hunting knives 
(p. 30); the latest out-the-front autos (p. 
94). Soldiers' Knives: "Capt. John" and the 
Colin Cox M25 fighter he used in Iraq (p. 
24); most popular knives on an E-3 's pay (p. 
116). How-To: Drilling holes in knife tangs 
made easier (p. 60). Knife Test: CRKT Side 
Hawg (p. 38). Hot Maker: Steve Dunn (p. 
42). Hot Knife Company: Sigarms Knives 
(p. 86). Antique Pocketknives: Florist's 
knives (p. 52). Retail Profile: Portland 
Cutlery observes its 100 lh anniversary (p. 
122). Death In The Family: Cutlery Hall- 
Of-Famer Buster Warenski (p. 102). Cover 
Knife: Kellam Tracker. 
n 




Month: OCT. '05 Issue: DEC. '05 

Newsmakers: Having lifted the export 
ban on India's sambar stag on March 5, 
the Indian government reinstitutes the 
ban on Sept. 5 (p. 10); the Guild Show 
enjoys a weekend of great knives (p. 12). 
Trends: The latest in factory/custom 
collaborations (p. 104). How-To: Make the 
handle straight with the blade (p. 94). Knife 
Test: Angel Sword Sky Marshal (p. 38). 
Knife Embellishment: The ancient art of 
guilloche (p. 52). Soldiers' Knives: Marine 
Sgt. Heath Lanctot uses his CRKT Desert 
Cruiser in the war in Iraq (p. 114). Collector 
Profile: Gary Capraro (p. 30). Kitchen 
Knives: The latest in holiday carving sets 
(p. 120). Hot Knife Company: Heckler 
& Koch (p. 22). Deaths In The Family: 
Knifemakers John Poythress and Frank 
Potter, and Army MSG Robert Horrigan, 
brother of ABS master smith John Horrigan 
(p. 80). Cover Knife: Warren Thomas' Yori 
Toshi. 

Month: NOV. '05 Issue: JAN. '06 

Newsmakers: Kershaw reportedly is 
the first to use the metal-injection-molding 
(MIM) process to make blades for knives 



(p. 12). Trends: The return of chute knives 
(p. 26); hottest grind of the bladesmiths (p. 




60). Buying Trends: Hottest-selling factory 
knives for $150-$200 (p. 19). Soldiers' 
Knives: A small group of makers donates 
handmades to active-duty personnel (p. 
32). Cutting Competition: Reggie Barker 
and Dickie Robinson qualify for the 2006 
BLADE Show World Championship 
Cutting Competition (p. 84). Steels: Today's 
most popular stainless steels (p. 94). Knife 
Test: Chris Crawford's EDC-1 (p. 92). 
Sharpener Test: CRKT Slide Sharp (p. 98). 
Hot Knife Company: Blade-Tech (p. 42). 
Hot Maker: Virgil England (p. 47). New 
Knife Breed: Spyderco's Eric Glesser (p. 
104). Death In The Family: Pete Hamilton 
(p. 80). Cover Knife: Ruli's Chute Knife by 
Ricardo Velarde. 

■ "■■■ '"■"' r 




Month: Dec. '05 Issue: Feb. '06 

Newsmakers: The ABS discontinues 
sponsoring cutting competitions and what 
was the ABS annual cutting championships 
is changed to the BLADE Show World 
Championship Cutting Competition (p. 
10); BLADE Show West is a success at 
its new home in Portland, Oregon (p. 18). 
Trends: The new wave of tactical folder 
makers (p. 12); factory knives made in the 
traditional Japanese style (p. 30). How-To: 
Drill mother-of-pearl without chipping it 
(p. 72). Steels: The most popular carbon 
steels for knives (p. 42). Knife Awards: 
The 2005 BLADEhandmade™ Awards (p. 
116). Sharpening: How many passes does 
it take? (p. 108). Pioneer Knifemaker: 
A.G. Bimson (p. 60). Hot Makers: Theuns 
Prinsloo (p. 26) and Sam Butler (p. 66). 
New Knife Book: BLADE'S Guide To 
Knives & Their Values (p. 100). Death In 
The Family: Judy Koval (p. 10). Cover 
Knife: Kirby Lambert's Inferno. 




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BLADE / 87 



By Ed Fowler 
BLADE® field editor 




of Knife Shows 




0- 



his past fall, BLADE Show West moved to 
a new home at the Portland Airport Holiday 

. Inn & Conference Center in Portland, Or- 
egon. Change always knows some emotion; there 
were folks who felt the move was a mistake, and 
there were those who looked forward to the new 
surroundings. Many of the show's exhibitors know 
friends in California, the event's previous loca- 
tion, who would be missed in Portland. On the oth- 
er hand, for the optimistic, new friendships were 
waiting in Portland. 

BLADE shows— whether the BLADE Show 
or BLADE Show West — are always special to me 
for many reasons. BLADE® readers reside in every 
state and many countries. Wherever the BLADE 
family has a reunion, friends will meet who have 
not had the opportunity to shake hands before, and 
friendships become stronger. 

BLADE shows today are better than ever. Those 
attending them know they are among friends from 
the start; smiles and dedication to the quality of 
the event from the BLADE Show staff make good 
times easy. 

Helpful Manner 

This year I witnessed the kind of true concern for 



Mary Lutz, BLADE Show West and 
BLADE Show coordinator, watches 
as Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famer© Bob Loveless autographs a 
copy of Living on the Edge: Logos 
of the Loveless Legend at a past 
BLADE Show West. Afterward, Bob 
is the pleased recipient of a hug 
and a thank-you kiss. 




blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



the individuals who come to the show 
that sets BLADE shows in the lead of 
what makes great shows. 

Accidents and unplanned events are a 
part of life. When we attend knife shows, 
many are thousands of miles from home, 
in a new environment and without the 
benefit of known friends. It is easy to feel 
alone and wonder what would happen 
should the fickle finger of fate deal us 
a bad hand. When you attend a BLADE 
show, you need not worry. 

Mary Lutz, coordinator for BLADE 
Show West (she also coordinates the 
BLADE Show in Atlanta), always im- 
presses me with her sincere smiles, 
friendliness and helpful manner. Dur- 
ing the show she stays in contact with 
exhibitors. If an exhibitor needs any- 
thing special, Mary will do all she 
can to make sure the exhibitor has what 
he/she needs. 

This year, Mary really and honestly 
shined. 

A good friend of mine and a veteran 
show exhibitor was experiencing some 
health problems. He spent two nights in 
the hospital but made it back to his dis- 
play table each day of the show. 

I was concerned when I first noted 
his absence from the show early Friday 
morning. I saw Mary and asked her if she 
knew where he was. She related what had 
happened to him and reassured me that 



he was in good hands. 

In the true spirit of knife shows, the 
exhibitor returned to the show later that 
morning. When the show ended, Mary got 
up early and accompanied him to the air- 
port in time for his flight, and saw to it that 
he was in the good hands of the airlines. 

The exhibitor was not alone at 
the show, he had friends, but Mary 
took official charge to see to it that all 
went as well as possible. She left nothing 
to chance. 

Mary had completed four busy days 
that resulted in a successful show, hard 
work that would have made sleeping in 
easy. Instead, she demonstrated her true 
concern for one member of the BLADE 
Show West family, the type of sincere 
humanity of which we all can be proud. 

Mary Rules! 

BLADE Show West was a success. I 
know three makers who exhibited their 
knives at a show for the first time. All 
of them sold knives and were impressed 
with the professional and personal atten- 
tion they received from Mary and her 
BLADE Show West team. 
Thanks, Mary. 

Yours truly, 
Ed Fowler 




1862 MLK BLVD, RIVIERA BEACH, FL 33404-7105 • Phone: (561) 863-3205 • Fax: (561) 863-3277 
For Quick Service Toll Free: (800) 500-FURY(3879) • e-mail: mail@joyenterprises.com 

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MARCH 2006 



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BLADE / 89 



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By M/fce Haskew 




Gary Smith keeps 
his collection in 
a three-corner 
cabinet that will 
hold up to about 
300 knives. He 
removed the 
original shelves, 
extended them 5 
inches, and cut 
slots in them to 
hold the knives. 
(Patrick photo) 



90 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Gary s highest-profile pieces is a fixed-blade 
hunter made by Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fam- 
er© Bill Moran. Gary bought it for $63 around 1959. 
He said that he was offered $5,000 for it at the ^ 
last BLADE Show. According to Gary, 
Mr. Moran told him that it is one of 
the few knives he made with 
a handle of whitetail deer 
antler. (Patrick photo) 




?>L 





When Gary Smith began col- 
lecting knives, his goal was 
to own one from every known 
maker. It was 1957, a time when his goal 
was attainable. 

Times change. The number of custom 
knifemakers has grown to levels that no one 
could imagine nearly 50 years ago. Along 
with that growth, the perspectives of knife 
collectors have changed as well. While it 
may not be possible to collect a knife from 
every maker, it is well within reach to main- 
tain a collection that anyone would envy. 

Gary, 70, has been married to his wife, 
Betty, for 49 years and is the father of grown 
sons Ty and Tal. Gary is still active in the oil 
company begun by his father in 1932, and 
arrives at work every morning at 6:30. Just 
as he has stayed with the family business, 
he has remained an avid knife collector, and 
the list of makers whose work he owns reads 
like a history of custom knifemaking. 

"Back around 1957, I was reading an 
article in Gun Digest'' Gary remembered, 
"and it had four custom knifemakers in it. I 
acquired a knife from each of them. The first 
thing you know, there were 10 knives [in my 
collection], then 20, and then it got out of 
hand. I have close to 200 knives now, and I 



I ':"". .'. I 



keep them in a three-corner cabinet that will 
hold up to about 300 knives. I took the origi- 
nal shelves out, extended them 5 inches, and 
cut slots in them to hold the knives." 

The $63 Moran 

When Gary started collecting knives, a 
number of the makers he bought from were 
on their way to becoming legends, and the 
prices he paid back then are absolutely re- 
markable by today's standards. One of his 
highest-profile pieces is a fixed-blade hunter 
made by Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of- 
Famer© Bill Moran that Gary bought for 
$63 around 1959. The blade, fashioned in 
Moran's pre-damascus days, is of forged 
carbon steel and bears the mark "By W.F. 
Moran Lime Kiln." The handle is crown 
whitetail stag, and a fine leather sheath ac- 
companies the piece. 

"I put in an order for anything Moran had 
available, and there was a six-month wait at 
that time," Gary said. "I bought it through the 
mail, and I turned down $5,000 for the knife 
at the last BLADE Show. I talked to Moran 
while I was there, and he said he had made 
very few knives with whitetail handles. He 
told me, 'Who would have dreamed that a 
$60 knife of mine would be worth what it is 






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collector profile 



Old-Time Roll Call 



Among the knives of old-time 
makers in Gary Smith's col- 
lection are those by, in alphabetical 
order: Sid Bell; Lew Booth; H.G. 
Bourne; Blade Magazine Cutlery 
Hall-Of-Famer© Blackie Collins; 
John Nelson Cooper; Dan Dennehy; 
Bob Dozier; Harvey Draper; Bart 
Draper; Clyde Fischer; Bucker Gas- 
con; Lloyd Hale; Hall-Of-Famers 
George Herron, Gil Hibben and D' 
Holder; W.C. "Bill" Johnson; Ruf- 
fin Johnson; Hall-Of-Famer Jimmy 
Lile; Walt Kneubuhler; Hall-Of- 
Famers Bob Loveless and Bill Mo- 
ran; Harry Morseth; R.D. Nolen; 
Lloyd Pendleton; Hall-Of-Famers 
Bo Randall and Rudy Ruana; Corbet 
Sigman; Merle Seguine; Bernard 
Sparks; GW. Stone; R.W. Wilson; 
Don Zaccagnino and many more. 

today? And I know you didn't, either.'" 

Other makers whose knives Smith has 
collected include Lloyd Hale, Merle Seguine, 
Harvey Draper, and Cutlery Hall-Of-Fam- 
ers Jimmy Lile, Bob Loveless, W.D. "Bo" 
Randall and Rudy Ruana. All the aforemen- 
tioned makers are deceased except for Hale 
and Loveless. The Seguine knife is one of 
Merle's trademark gut-hook blades of car- 
bon steel with a caribou antler handle. One 
of the knives by Loveless, made in 1984, is 
a stag-handle Ducks Unlimited drop-point 
hunter with an ATS-34 stainless steel blade. 

"I ordered four knives from Seguine 
and paid him up front," Gary chuckled. "I 
only got one of those knives. He was hard to 
get a knife out of. I have one of Hale's early 
knives that he hardened before he stamped 
it, so he wrote his name on the blade with an 
etching pencil. 

"The Ruana knife is pretty crude. It has 
an elk-horn handle and a carbon steel blade, 
and it will hold an edge really good. I paid 
$13 for it. I just turned down $5,000 for the 
Loveless Ducks Unlimited knife." 

An example of Harvey Draper's work, a 
$30 investment, is special to Gary because 
of the maker's responsiveness. 

"Harvey was very nice to talk to, and he 
would fire you a letter right back when you 
wrote to him. His son, Bart Draper, is the 
same way," he noted. "Both made beautiful 
knives with outstanding fit and finishes. 

"Over the years, I have become good 
friends with a lot of the makers. Most of 
these guys are fine fellows." 

Where and What 

Some might find it surprising that Smith 
has attended relatively few knife shows. 



92 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Gary's Merle Seguine gut-hook hunter 
has a carbon steel blade and a handle 
of caribou antler. Seguine, whose 
knifemaking heyday was in the 1950s 
and '60s, is credited by many knife 
observers with popularizing the gut 
hook. (Patrick photo) ^ 





Through the years, he has bought most of 
his knives via the mail or at the Ohio Gun 
Collectors Show, originally held in Colum- 
bus and now in Wilmington. In fact, it was 
the encouragement of friends that eventually 
persuaded him to attend the 2005 BLADE 
and Guild shows. 

"They said, 'You've definitely got to go,'" 
Gary recalled, "so, for the Guild Show, 1 took 
about 10 of my knives, which were made 
by Moran, Loveless, Gil Hibben, George 
Herron, D' Holder, and others. I showed 
my knives to a lot of people, and they had 
never seen them before. I suppose I will go 
to the BLADE Show and the Guild Show [in 
2006]. My friend, Bill Johnson (see page 38), 
put my name in for honorary membership in 
The Knifemakers' Guild this year." 

A long-time hunter of big game, Gary 
displays 65 mounts in his trophy room. Natu- 
rally, he has gravitated to the hunting style of 
knives, but he does own some examples of 
fighters and others as well. The famous Love- 
less dropped hunter, or drop point as it is best 
known, is his favorite and, judging from the 
number of stag-handle knives he owns, it is 
easy to tell his preference on grip materials. 

"Sambar stag is my favorite," he said. "1 



have two or three crown stags, but I like the 
slab-handle style. Just looking at the pictures 
of my collection, I would say 75 percent of 
the knives have stag handles. By the time the 
stag embargo started [in 1998], I had been 
buying handle slabs at shows. [Now], when 
I contact a maker about buying a knife, I 
may just send the stag with the order and let 
him use mine." (Editor's note: Lifted by the 
government of India on March 5, 2005, the 
ban on the export of its Sambar stag was re- 
instituted by the same government this past 
Sept. 5.) 

While Gary acknowledges that there 
are many fine custom knifemakers today, 
he sees the major difference between the 
knives of the older and newer makers as one 
of size and heft. "I always liked a big, heavy 
knife," he commented. "Back then, they 
made them like that. Now, everything is 
very slim, and I don't care for a lot of these 
wild-looking knives." 

Some of Smith's favorite makers these 
days include George Trout, Bill Johnson, 
Tom Downing and Mike Franklin. Trout's 
14-year-old grandson, who won best in show 
at a recent knife show in Ohio, is making a 
knife for Gary now. He also has an order in 




with Utah-based maker John Young. The 
latter knife is a Loveless-style drop point 
with a stag handle, one of several Loveless- 
inspired patterns Young has been making to 
rave reviews in recent months. 

In honor of his love of hunting, Gary has 
commissioned Sandra Brady to scrimshaw 
images of an impala, cape buffalo, sable an- 
telope and warthog on four different knives 
by George Trout. 

What He Looks For 

If you are considering becoming a knife 
collector, look at the fit and finish of a piece 
you are thinking about buying, Gary said. 
Observe how the joints are set, the quality 
of the soldering, and the way the handle is 
ground. Gary always buys knives that he 
wants to own rather than on speculation. 

"When I see something I like, I buy it," 
he remarked. "I look at magazines, and most 
of my knives have been bought off people 
at gun shows. There are a lot of new and 
used knives out there, and a lot of brand new 
people collecting knives. Once in a while, 
somebody will turn loose of one." 

Gary's half century of collecting knives 
is something special. Over that time, he 
has seen some newcomers rise to legend- 
ary status, while others have faded away. A 
keen eye for quality continues to help him 
spot those with promise, and his collection 
keeps growing. 



Cct^k 



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4941 Cardinal Trail 
Palm Harbor, FL 34683 
Phone: (727) 942-6420 

or (603) 943-1327 



e-mail: 
willyb@willyb.com 

Willy B. Ellis 

Knifemaker 




Awards For 

Artistry 

Specializing In: 
Hand Carved Ivory 
Antler and Horn 
Exotic Woods 
File Works 
Stone Settings 
Handmade Sheaths 
Scrimshandering 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 93 



Inside World Knife Collecting & Investing 




Pick of the Picks 

Pocketkniffe blade 
openers are one of the 
most interesting yet 
most overlooked cutlery 
collecting specialties 



No. 107 



Picture, if you will, a worker in 
an unnamed cutlery factory. 
The worker's job was to adjust 
pocketknives after they had been assembled, 
all pins peined and spun. The worker saw 
to it that all the blades opened and snapped 
closed without hitting each other or the 
sides of the knife itself. 

For the uninitiated, the movement of 
the blades as they snap open and closed is 
called walk and talk. The knife "walks" if, 
as you open the blade part way, it opens 
the rest of the way on its own due to the 
pressure of the backspring on the tang; it 
"talks" if its blade snaps closed. 



"Some were made 

with scales of 

mother-of-pearl, 

jigged bone or 

celluloid." 
— the author 



In addition to ensuring that the blades of 
each knife walked and talked, the worker's 
job was to see to it that the back of the 
blade lined up evenly with the backspring 

94 / BLADE 



By Richard D. White 
BLADE® field editor 





-4 


■ 


^~ — ^ 


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'^^^^^^ 




ft 


Insert the point of 

the pick into the nail 

nick of the master 




\ 


blade and pull it 




open. No more 






broken thumbnails! 






(White photo) 







(*£i s ISM -u» 


— — 


^ MAOE IN U.S. 4,-, 


-■•'jM 












■ 








^^^^ 




^ 








^ / 



















Original and recent reproduction blade openers include, clockwise from bottom 
left: F. Herders (Germany); Ulster (showing the reverse side stamped "REGENT"); 
Remington UMC (recent reproduction in the shape of a rifle cartridge); Case XX 
Tested Centennial (recent original); Frost Cutlery in jigged red bone (recent); 
Western States Cutlery (original with curved stamping); and Winchester (recent 
reproduction). (White photo) 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Custom-made blade openers include those with scales of, clockwise from bottom 
left: mother-of-pearl, stag (with shield), celluloid (the two at upper left), two-piece stag, 
jigged red bone, candy-stripe celluloid, and Christmas-tree celluloid. (White photo) 



in the open and closed positions, and, in 
the case of square tangs, even in the half- 
open position. On a typical day, the worker 
opened scores of blades as he tested each 
knife prior to final cleaning, oiling and 
packaging. 

As you might imagine, the wear and 
tear on the fingernails caused by such work 
was staggering. In fact, even with a strong 
thumbnail, the flesh under the nail itself 
turned black and blue from the constant 
strain. If he were to tear his fingernail 
below the nail line or the nail were to peel 



across the length of the thumb, the worker 
would be in dire straits. 

Since necessity has always been the 
mother of invention, at some point a cutlery 
worker grabbed an extra blade lying around 
and used it to assist in opening sturdy 
pocketknife blades. It could have been a 
broken blade that was snapped off during 
the slackening process, a blade rejected by 
quality control, or a blade run through the 
grinder to dull the sharpened edge and re- 
shape the point to fit into the nail nick of a 
pocketknife blade. 



Blade Opener Values 




n ichard D. White writes that, to his knowledge, there is only one publication that 
H^has made any attempt at listing and valuing pocketknife blade openers: Levine's 


Guide To Knives & Their Values, today known as the new BLADE'S Guide To Knives 


& Their Values. Some of the values for pocketknife blade openers that appear in the 


BLADE'S Guide To Knives & Their Values are as follows (for your copy of the new 


BLADE'S Guide, contact KP Books, P.O. B 


ox 5009, Iola, WI 54945-5009 800.258.0929 


[orders only] www.krausebooks.com): 




Brand 


Value 


Ulster 


$40 


Ulster Quality (celluloid) 


$45 


Napanoch Knife Co. 


$100 


Cattaraugus 


$100 


Barnsley Bros. 


$75 


Always Sharp, Griffon Knives (ivory) 


$150 


Remington UMC/Remington Cutlery 




(Bullet) 


$200 


Remington (bone w/bail) 


$375 


Remington (green celluloid) 


$350 


Winchester Trademark Made in U.S.A. 


$100 


Western States, Boulder, CO 


$60 


Robeson Shuredge (bone) 


$75 


Queen Cutlery, Titusville, PA 


$20 


W.R. Case & Sons, Bradford, PA 


$25 


Case XX Tested Centennial 


$25 


Camillus Has The Edge! 


$25 


Marble's-Gladstone, MI (recent) 


$25 




Spring 
Assist 
Opening 



Ambidextrous 

6.25" Open 



AGENT 
UTILITY 



9" 

Overall 




KODIAK 
M7 $199 




11.5" 
Overall 



"Over 2 Decades of 
Solid Service For Our 
Satisfied Customers" 



UPS Shipping $8 +$2 Ea Add'l Knife 

Credit Cards / M.O. to: 

Knife Mart, 596 W. 300 S. 

Heyburn, ID 83336 
super 8 fl 33 x 3213 Thousands 

MarKet www.knifemart.com in Stock 
For Knives KNIFE" 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE / 95 



LONE STAR WHOLESALE 



GREAT PRICES 

DEALERS ONLY 806-356-9540 




Resale Certificate or FFL Required 
Lone Star Wholesale, PO BOX 587, 
Amarillo, TX 79105 FAX 806-359-1603. 
All FAX Correspondence, please include 
Tax info, and phone number. 



Looking for a Knife dealer? 

Featuring unique custom and production knives. 
Offering "Local Dealer" service and "Internet Dealer" pricing. 

www.myknifedealer.com 






btf a 



Lynn O Olson 

Collector Knives 





Telephone: 1 (800) 207-6615 




Catalogue Knife 2HlcL Gull Catalogue 

$3.00 Finishing Supply $3.00 


PO Box 458 * Lakeside * AZ * 85929 NEW AREA CODE (928V-537-8877 



Damascus Billets 

Devin Thomas Stainless and Hi Carbon 



Disc Grinders 



9" Discs 

9x1 1 Sheets 

Spray Adhesive 



Belt Grinders 


1X42 Belts 
2X48 Belts 
2X72 Belts 
1X30 Belts 


/ \ 

Baldor Buffers 


Buffs 6"-8"-10" 



Hollow Grinding Video 
Flat Grinding Video 

25 Species of Wood 

Horn 

Ivory 

Giraffe Bone 

Exotic Skins 

Leather Dye 

Epoxies 

Imitation Stag 

Steel 




( Blades 



•440c 
•ATS 34 
•D-2 
•15N20 



•1084 
•1095 
•203-E 





^Z 




Multi Tool Grinder-Buffer 


' 


Multi Tool Attachment only $ 
Jet Motor only $ 


310 
189 



Custom Stabilizing 

10 Years Experience 

Wood-Bone-Ivory-Horn 




EDGES (Cont.) 



In all likelihood, the salesmen who 
worked for the various cutlery companies 
were having the same problem as the 
workers on the plant assembly lines. 
Salesmen who sold pocketknives to various 
hardware and general store owners were 
constantly opening knives to exhibit the 
etching on the blades, or to demonstrate the 
resounding snap of the blade when it closed. 
Since the factory workers opened thousands 
of blades daily, it is easy to envision a 
discussion between one of the salesmen 
and a factory worker, with the salesman 
listening to the worker's innovative solution 
to an "open-and-shut" problem. 



"Almost every 

large cutlery 

company made 

blade openers * 

— the author 



55 



Orders only 800-972- 1192 www, knifeandgun. com 



Seeing the potential of using blade 
openers not only to save tender thumbnails 
but also as a surefire advertising gimmick 
or giveaway, the salesman suggested 
that the shop foreman stamp out various 
"official" blade openers with the logo of the 
applicable cutlery company. It was not long 
before cutlery salesmen everywhere, armed 
with the newly designed blade openers, or 
picks as they were called, hit the road with 
a couple dozen knife picks tucked into their 
suit pockets. 

Narrow Lengths of Steel 

Blade openers were narrow lengths of steel, 
about 254-3 inches long, thinned at one 
end, and stamped with the logo or slogan 
of whichever cutlery company sold them. 
As on standard knives, some of the openers 
were made with scales of mother-of-pearl, 
jigged bone or celluloid. 

The salesmen quickly distributed the 
knife picks to pocketknife dealers as a way 
of saying thanks for past business or as 
a way of sealing a new deal. In time, the 
openers became very popular and today are 
rare and quite collectible. 

Almost every large cutlery company 
made blade openers, and many serious 
knife collectors are on the lookout today for 
the elusive cutlery collectibles. Compared 
to the millions of knives made for the 
general consumer, blade openers generally 
were given only to knife dealers and rarely 
to consumers. Consequently, the number 



96 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 







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77?e blade opener at left is a working model from the Western Cutlery factory. It is 
rougher, thicker and unstamped in comparison to the shiny, curve-stamped Western 
States Cutlery model (middle) given by salesmen to hardware store owners. At right 
is a jigged-bone premium stockman made by Western Cutlery of Boulder, Colorado. 
(White photo) 



of original antique blade openers is rather 
small. 

Among the companies to have made 
and/or sold them were Case; Griffon 
Knives; Remington UMC (several 
different varieties); Shapleigh Hardware; 
Winchester; Western States Cutlery Co.; 
Case XX Tested Centennial; Marble's 
(recent); Camillus; Ulster; Challenge 
Cutlery; Northfield; Empire; Napanoch; 
Cattaraugus; Barnsley Bros.; Robeson 
Shuredge; Universal; Queen; Canton 
Hardware; Stiletto Cutlery; Magnetic 
Cutlery; Hibbard-Spencer-Bartlett; Keen 
Kutter; Hen and Rooster; Frost Cutlery 
(recent); H. Boker; J.A. Henckels; Puma; 
and Carl Schlieper. 



"Several 

companies 

reproduced them." 

— the author 



Because of the rarity of the original 
blade openers, several companies 
reproduced them. The two most common 
are those bearing the Remington Cutlery 
stamping, the blade opener itself shaped 
like a rifle cartridge. The other common 
reproductions have the Winchester 
stamping. Like many of the original blade 
openers, both repros have a hole in the end 
for attachment to a key ring. 

In addition, several different custom 
knifemakers and other craftsmen make 
their own blade openers, using colorful 
celluloids and jigged bone. Some inset 



pocketknife shields into the sides of the 
more ornate openers. 

1 don't know about you but I am cursed 
with weak fingernails. It takes weeks to grow 
my thumbnail out to where it can be placed 
under the nail nick of the master blade 
of any pocketknife, and only seconds to 
produce a large nick out of the middle of the 
nail. Frequently this occurs when opening 
a knife found at the flea market, a knife 
that has more than its share of dried oil and 
grease, pocket lint and other hindrances to 
the smooth opening and closing of the blade, 
or large knives such as premium stockmen 
or trappers that require a significant amount 
of leverage. A blade opener is an absolute 
necessity in such cases, and, along with a 
magnifying loupe, should be included in all 
of your cutlery adventures. 

The blade opener that I use was made 
from an old New York Knife Co. blade, 
with the company's famous hammer logo 
on one side and the New York Knife logo 
on the other. In addition to opening all sorts 
of pocketknife blades, I have used it to pry 
open paint cans, tight pop tabs, and other 
containers that defy the normal means of 
opening. I have used it to clean dirt from 
the liners of old farmer's knives and scrape 
dried grease and oil from the tangs of 
knives so that I could read the tang mark. 
It is as much at home on my key ring as a 
small flashlight and my miniature Swiss 
Army knife with nail file. 

Because of their rarity and the lack 
of general knowledge about them, blade 
openers are one of the most interesting yet 
most overlooked collecting specialties in 
the cutlery field. They are as unusual as 
many of the knives they have been used 
to open, and are a classic example of the 
cutlery industry's filling a specific need. 



HideAwayKnife.com 


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BLADE / 97 



; 



I M I LJ 



Paragon heat treating 
furnaces for knife makers 

"1 couldn't achieve the control I now 
enjoy had I not had a Paragon furnace," 
says Ed Fowler. "Owning a Paragon is 
extremely beneficial to blade smithing." 

The KM-24D shown above features 
the new Sentry digital controller and a 
larger, W wide thermocouple. Ask 
about our optional gas injection flow 
meter. 

Interiors of our knife maker fur- 
naces: 14 W long KM-14D, 24" long 
KM-24D, and 36" long KM-36D. (All 
three models are 5 l A" wide x 4 l A" high 
A inside.) Free brochure available. 
PaAaXfDfl. Industries, Inc. 

9 201 1 South Town East Blvd., 

A Mesquite, Texas 75 1 49- 1 1 22 

w 800-876-4328 / 972-288-7557 

Toll Free Fax 888-222-6450 

www.paragonweb.com 

paragonind@worldnet.att.net 




SANDING BELTS FOR SHARPENING 

Add 10% to Zirc prices for Ceramic belts. 
SIZE A.O. ZIRCONIUM S.C. 

BROWN BLUE BLACK 



1"x30" 

1"x42" 

2"x48"/2"x42" 

2"x60" 

2"x72" 

2"x132" 

3"x132" 

4"x36" 

4"x132" 

6"x48" 



$.75 ea 
.80 

1.20 
1.50 
1.60 
2.50 
4.50 
1.60 
6.00 
3.50 



$1.50 ea 
1.65 

2.50 
3.00 
3.50 
6.00 
7.50 
3.50 
9.00 
6.50 



$1.10 ea 
1.40 

2.20 
2.75 
2.50 
5.00 
7.00 
2.75 
9.50 
4.50 



BLACK SIL. CARBIDE WATERPROOF 

9"x11" Sheets $29.00/100 220-2500 Grit 

5 1/2"x9 1/2" Sheets $12.50/50 1,000/2000 Grit 



CERAMIC BELTS - NORTON "SG7CARB0 "MEDALLIST®" 
NORTON* BLUE "NORZON" ZIRCONIA, CORK BELTS 



COTTON BUFFING WHEELS & POLISHING COMPOUNDS 



DISCS, FLAP WHEELS, SHOP ROLLS 



RED HILL CORP., P.O. BOX 4234, GETTYSBURG, PA 17325 

(800)822-4003 HB S"«!P 

www.supergrit.com Lb. Ml catalog 




where to 



where to get 'em 



get em 



HOT LOCKS & FAST FOLDERS 
Columbia River Knife & Tool, attn: D. 
Flagg, Dept. BL3, 9720 SW Hillman, Suite 
805, Wilsonville OR 97070 503.685.5015 
www.crkt.com; Kershaw, attn: Thomas 
Welk, Dept. BL3, 18600 SW Teton Ave., 
Tualatin, OR 97062 800.325.2891 www. 
kershawknives.com; Spyderco, attn: J. 
Laituri, Dept. BL3, 820 Spyderco Way, 
Golden, CO 80403 800.525.7770 www. 
spyderco.com, customerservice@spyderco. 
com 

ART PECO KNIVES 
David Broadwell, Dept. BL3, POB 4314, 
Wichita Falls, TX 76308 940.692.1727 
david@broadwell.com, www.david. 
broadwell.com; Lloyd Hale, Dept. BL3, 
3492 Kerr Hill Rd., Lynville, TN 38472 
931.424.5846; Stephen Olszewski, Dept. 
BL3, 1820 Harkney Hill, Coventry, RI 
02816 401.397.4774 antlers53@msn.com, 
www.olszewskiknives.com; Scott Sawby, 
Dept. BL3, 480 Snowberry Ln., Sandpoint, 
ID 83864 208.263.4171 scotmar@imbris. 
net, www.sawbycustomknives.com; Ken 
Steigerwalt, Dept. BL3, 507 Savagehill, 
Orangeville, PA 17859 570.683.5156 
www.steigerwaltknives.com; Owen Wood, 
Dept. BL3, 6492 Garrison, Arvada, CO 
80004-3157 303.466.2748 ow2knives@cs. 
com 

TWO-HAND SWORDS 
C.A.S./Hanwei, attn: P. Shipley, Dept. 
BL3, 650 Industrial Blvd., Sale Creek, 
TN 37373 423.332.4700 www.casibe- 
ria.com; Cold Steel, attn: L. Thompson, 
Dept. BL3, 3036-A Seaborg, Ventura, CA 
93003 805.650.8481 www.coldsteel.com; 
Knights Edge, attn: M. Bastle, Dept. BL3, 
5696 N. Northwest Hwy., Chicago, IL 
60646-6136 773.775.3888 www.knight- 
sedge.com; Museum Replicas, attn: B. 
Brookhart, Dept. BL3, Box 840, Cony- 
ers, GA 30012 800.883.8838 www.muse- 
umreplicas.com; Pro Cut, attn: J. Wells, 
Dept. BL3, 9718 Washburn Rd., Downey, 



CA 90241 562.803.8778 800.356.8507 
www.procutdist.com 

MAKERS TO WATCH 
Jack Davenport, Dept. BL3, 5212 
Lagos Ct, New Port Richey, FL 34655 
352.424.2567 jacknife@verizon. 
net; Tommy Gann, Dept. BL3, 2876 
State Hwy. 198, Canton, TX 75103 
903.848.9375 tsgann@aol.com; Gary 
lames, Dept. BL3, POB 8493, South Lake 
Tahoe, CA 96158-1493 530.541.2250 
iames@charter.net; Keith Ouye 
808.395.7000 keithouyeknives@yahoo. 
com; Ford Swauger, Dept. BL3, 
1419 Colonial, Roseberg, OR 97470 
541.679.8861 knifemkr@cmspan.net 

THE TACTICAL FIXED BLADE ZONE 
A.G. Russell Knives, attn: D. Myers, 
Dept. BL3, 1920 N. 26th St., Lowell, 
AR 72745 800.255.9034 www.agrus- 
sell.com, ag@agrussell.com; Al Mar 
Knives, attn: G. Fadden, Dept. BL3, POB 
2295, Tualatin, OR 97062 503.670.9080 
info@almarknives.com, www.almarknives. 
com; Busse Combat Knife Co., attn: J. 
Busse, Dept. BL3, 11651 Cnty. Rd. 12, 
Wauseon, OH 43567 419.923.6471 www. 
bussecombat.com, orders@bussecombat. 
com; Gerber Legendary Blades, attn: 
M. Schindel, Dept. BL3, 14200 S.W 72nd 
Ave., Portland, OR 97223 503.639.6161 
www.gerberblades.com; Ka-Bar Knives, 
attn: T Troutman- Warner, Dept. BL3, 200 
Homer St., Olean, NY 14760 800.282.0130 
www.ka-bar.com, twarner@ka-bar.com; 
SOG Specialty Knives, attn: B. Lasley, 
Dept. BL3, 6521 212th St. SW, Lynnwood, 
WA 98036 425.771.6230 www.sogknives. 
com, sogsales@sogknives.com 

BLADE SHOW 2006 AD 

Twin Blades, attn: H. Matthews, Dept. 

BL3, 121 Mt. Pisgah Church Rd., States- 

boro, GA 30458 912.865.9098 www. 

twinxblades.com 

Blade 



98 / BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



uStSDrSEwj^^TeSrw 



Blade Show 



June 16, 17, 18, 2006 
In Atlanta's Cobb Galleria Centre 




SHOW OPENS 

Friday, June 16: 2pm - 7pm 
Sunday, June 

Show Highlights 



TO THE PUBLIC 

Saturday, June 17: 9am - 6pm 
18: 9am - 4pm 



• American Bladesmith Society 
Annual Convention 

• Special Knifemakers Guild Section 

• FREE "Super Seminars" 

• Blade Magazine's 2006 Knives of the Year™ 
and Handmade Awards™ 



• 2006 BLADE Magazine Cutlery Industry 
Hall-of-Fame Inductions 

• The Nation's Top Collections 

• Over 600 Knifemaker and Antique Tables 
and Manufacturers' Booths 

• All Major Knifemaking Suppliers 



Thanks to Knifemakers 

such as Harry Mathews with Twin Blades 

pictured below, all Attendees have a 

chance to win great knives in our 

Win-A-Blade Game. 




For more information on Twin Blades, 
see "Where To Get Em." 



• 2006 Hotel Reservations • 

Renaissance Waverly Hotel 

Phone: (770) 953-4500 
Mention the Blade Show 

for Special Rate 
Book Early as rooms do sell out! 

• Travel Discounts • 

United Airlines is the official air carrier 
for the BLADE Show. 

Call 800-521-4041. 

Use Event Code 554SF. 

Avis is the official car rental service. 

The discount code is J099319. 

Call them at 800-331-1600 

For additional information contact 

2006 BLADE SHOW 

700 East State Street 
lola, Wl 54990-0001 

(877) 746-9757 

Fax: (715)445-4087 

E-mail: mary.lutz@fwpubs.com 

http://www.bladeshow.com 






■ 



LADE 

The World's t1 Knife Publication 

700 East State St. 
lola, Wl 54990-0001 
PH. 715-445-4612 
Fax: 7 1 5-445-4087 
www.blademag.com 

Missy Beyer, 

Advertising Sales 

ext. 642 

e-mail: 

missy.beyer@fwpubs.com 

Bruce Wolberg 
Advertising Sales 
ext. 403 
e-mail: 
bruce.wolberg@fwpubs. 




wfi-io NET EM 






2thehilt.com 
2thehilt.com 
phil@2thehilt.com 

A.G. Russell Knives, Inc. 

www.agrussell.com 

ag@agrussell.com 

Anderson Knives 

www.cbaknives.com 

info@cbaknives.com 

Angel Sword 

www.angelsword.com 

info@angelsword.com 

Archers Knives 

www.archersknives.com 

archert@trib.com 

Arizona Custom Knives 

www.arizonacustomknives.com 

sharptalk@bellsouth.net 

Atlanta Cutlery 

www.atlantacutlery.com 

atlcut@mindspring.com 

Beckwith's Blade 

www.beckwithsblades.com 

info@beckwithsblades.com 

Benchmade 

www.benchmade.com 

Benchmade_Update@Benchmade.com 

Best Blade 

www.bestblade.com 

info@bestblade.com 

Benchmark/National Knife 
Distributors 
www.nkdi.com 
nkdi@nkdi.com 

Best Knives 

www.bestknives.com 

info@bestknives.com 

Blackstocksinc.com 

www.blackstocksinc.com 

garyz@yellville.net 

Blade Art Inc. 

www.bladeart.com 

info@bladeart.com 

Bladegallery.com 

www.bladegallery.com 

Omalley@bladegallery.com 

Bladetown 

www.bladetown.com 

customer@bladetown.com 

Blades By Brown Cutlery 

www.bladesbybrown.com 

dave@bladesbybrown.com 

Bob Neal Custom Knives 

www.bobnealcustomknives.com 

bob@bobnealcustomknives.com 

Bob's Knife Connection 
www.bobs-knives.com 
knifeconnection@nc.rr.com 

Brian Tighe 

www.tigheknives.com 

tighe@netcom.ca 



Bubba Knives 

www.bubbaknives.com 

warren@bubbaknives.com 

Burger Knives 

www.swordcane.com 

info@swordcane.com 

Busse Combat Knife Company 

www.bussecombat.com 

busse@bright.net 

CAS. Iberia 

www.casiberia.com 

cas@casiberia.com 

Cable Joe Knives 
http://homepage.mac. 

com/coffman/cablejoe 
cablejoeknives@earthlink.net 

Canada's Knife Zone 
Online Knife & Sword Store 
www.knifezone.ca 
sales@knifezone.ca 

Circle P Knives 

www.circlepknives.net 

paulv22@cox.net 

Cobra Imports 
Swords, Knives, Armor 
www.cobraimports.com 
cobraimports@aol.com 

Custom Knife Gallery of Colorado 

www.customknifegallery.com 

bob_glassman@yahoo.com 

Custom Knife Consignment 

www.customknifeconsignment.com 
bob@customknifeconsignment.com 

Custom Leather Knife Sheaths 

www.customsheaths.com 

rschrap@aol.com 

Cutlery Specialties 
www.restorationproduct.com 
Renaissance Micro-Crystalline 
Wax/Polish 
Dennis Blaine; dennis13@aol.com 

Cutting Edge Cutlery Co. 

No one in Canada has more knives 

www.swords.ca 

Dantes Knifeworks 

www.DantesKnife.com 

sales@DantesKnife.com 

E-Blades.com 

www.e-blades.com 

sales@e-blades.com 

EDC Knives 

www.edcknives.com 

blade@edcknives.com 

Every Day Carry Knives & Gear 

EdgeDealer.com 

www.edgedealer.com 

edgedealer1@yahoo.com 

Dave Ellis -"CA. 1st ABS M.S." 

www.exquisiteknives.com 

ellis@mastersmith.com 

Ernie Lyle - Knifemaker 

www.ernestlyleknives.com 

ernestlyle@msn.com 



FIRST NATIONS KNIVES, LLC 
www.firstnationsknives.com 
info@firstnationsknives.com 

John Fraps 

www.frapsknives.com 

jfraps@att.net 

Frost Cutlery 

www.frostcutlery.com 

knives@frostcutlery.com 

Gary Levine Fine Knives 

www.levineknives.com 

Gary@levineknives.com 

Georgia Knifemakers' Guild 
www.georgiaknifemakersguild.com 
"Member List, Web sites and 
Galleries" 

Ghostmaker Custom Knives 

www.ghostmakercustom.com 

admin@ghostmakercustom.com 

Grand Prairie Knives 

www.gpknives.com 

gpk@gpknives.com 

Great Lakes Custom Knives 

www.greatlakescustomknives.com 

bud@greatlakescustomknives.com 

Guild Knives - Selling 

Custom Collection, Don Guild 
www.guildknives.com 

Halpern Titanium 

www.halperntitanium.com 

info@halperntitanium.com 

Hawkins Knife Making Supplies 

www.hawkinsknifemakingsupplies.com 

sales@hawkinsknifemakingsupplies.com 

HideAway Knife 

Easy to retain. Easy to conceal. 
Fast to access. 
www.hideawayknife.com 

Hoffman Knives - Selling 
Top Quality Collection - Walt 
www.hoffmanknives.com 

Independent Knife and 
Novelty 

independentknife.com 
info@independentknife.com 

Jays Knives/American Edge 

www.jaysknives.com 

jay@jaysknives.com 

Jot Singh Khalsa 

A Wise Investment in Handmade 

Knives and Swords 

www.khalsakirpans.com 

jotkhalsa@comcast.net 

Knife & Sword Auction 

www.bladebid.com 

bladebid@cs.com 

Knife Center of the Internet 

www.knifecenter.com 

info@knifecenter.com 

Knife Legends 
Handmade custom knives 
www.knifelegends.com 
pshindler@comcast.net 



Toll Free 800-272-5233 



Knife Mart 

www.knifemart.com 

sales@knifemart.com 

KnifeShows.com 

www.knifeshows.com 

tedmerchant@comcast.net 

Knives Plus 

www.KnivesPlus.com 

KnivesPlus@KnivesPlus.com 

Last Legend Competition Blades 

www.lastlegend.com 

sales@lastlegend.com 

Lee's Cutlery 

www.LeesCutlery.com 

beeneJL43@earthlink.net 

Legendary Knifemakers.com 
www.legendaryknifemakers.com 
We Buy Collections 

Lightfoot Knives 

www.lightfootknives.com 

pitbull@lightfootknives.com 

Lone Wolf Knives 

www.lonewolfknives.com 

sales@lonewolfknives.com 

Luna Knives 

www.lunaknives.com 

lunaknives@aol.com 

Mackrill Knives 

www.mackrill.co.za 

info@mackrill.co.za 

Marzitelli Custom Knives 

www.marzknives.com 

info@marzknives.com 

Charlie Mattox 

www.mattoxknife.com 

charlie@mattoxknife.com 

Moore Cutlery 

www.moorecutlery.com 

gary@moorecutlery.com 

Mother Of Pearl Co. Inc. 
www.knifehandles.com 
www.stingrayproducts.com 
mopco@earthlink.net 

Moulton Knives 

www.moultonknives.com 

dusty@moultonknives.com 

Museum Replicas 

www.museumreplicas.com 

musrep@mindspring.com 

www.myknifedealer.com 
Lynn 0. Olson 
blade@myknifedealer.com 

Nashville Knife Shop 

www.nashvilleknifeshop.com 

info@nashvilleknifeshop.com 

Neilson's Mountain Hollow 
J & Tess Neilson 
www.mountainhollow.net 
mountainhollow@emcs.net 

New Graham Knives 

www.NewGraham.com 

mdye@newgraham.com 






Nittinger Knives - Selling 
Top Quality Collection 
www.nittingerknives.com 
dave@nittingerknives.com 

Northwest School of Knifemaking 

Bronksknifeworks.com 

bronks@bronksknifeworks.com 

Ohare Knives 

sean@ohareknives.ca 

www.ohareknives.ca 

Okuden Custom Kydex 

www.okuden.net 

info@okuden.net 

Only Fine Knives 
www.onlyfineknives.com 
Specializing in William Henry & 
Chris Reeve 

Oso Famoso 

Fossil Ivory-Mammoth Bark Knife Scales 

http://www.osofamoso.com 

oso@osofamoso.com 

Peters' Heat Treating 

www.petersheattreat.com 

info@petersheattreat.com 

www.portlandknife.com 
Your source for the Northwest's 
finest knives 
sales@PortlandKnife.com 

Pratt's Collectible Cutlery 
Case, Puma, Parker, Boker, Bulldog, 
Muela, Remington 
Knife Store www.prattscutlery.com 

QuickKnife 
"Live Sharply" 
www.quickknife.com 
sales@quickknife.com 

Darrel Ralph 

www.darrelralph.com 

darrel@darrelralph.com 

Ray Jay Knives 

www.rayjayknives.com 

ray@rayjayknives.com 

Ray Rogers Handcrafted Knives 

www.rayrogers.com 

knives@rayrogers.com 

Robertson's Custom Cutlery 

www.robertsoncustomcutlery.com 

customknives@comcast.net 

Rocky Mountain Knife Works 

www.RockyMtnKnifeWorks.com 

sales@RockyMtnKnifeWorks.com 

Sentry Solutions Ltd. 

www.sentrysolutions.com 

tufcloth@sentrysolutions.com 

Smoky Mountain Knife Works 

www.eKnifeWorks.com 

webmaster@smkw.com 

Sooner State Knives 

www.soonerstateknives.com 

ssknives@swbell.net 



Spartan Cutlery 

www.knivescentral.com 

info@knivescentral.com 

Steel Addiction Custom Knives 

www.SteelAddictionKnives.com 

davestark@steeladdictionknives.com 

SUPER BLADES.COM 

WWW.SUPERBLADES.COM 

sales@superblades.com 

Svord Knives 

www.svord.com 

svord@xtra.co.nz 

Swamp Rat Knives 

www.swamprat.com 

info@swamprat.com 

Switchbladeking.com 

Large Selection of Automatic Knives 

Sales@SwitchBladeKing.com 

The Equipment Outpost 

www.the-equipment-outpost.com 

chad@the-equipment-outpost.com 

The Knifery 

Canada's #1 Knife Store 

www.theknifery.com 

knifery@telus.net 

The Sword Armory 

www.swordarmory.com 

sales@swordarmory.com 

Toolshop 

www.toolshop.de 

info@toolshop.de 

Trident Knives 

www.tridentknives.com 

tridentknives@yahoo.com 

True North Knives 

www.truenorthknives.com 

info@truenorthknives.com 

Twin Blades 

www.twinxblades.com 

twinblades@bulloch.net 

Viking Wholesale 

www.vikingwholesale.com 

sales@vikingwholesale.com 

Vinny's Knives 

www.vinnysknives.com 

vinny@vinnysknives.com 

Daniel Winkler 
Master Bladesmith 
www.winklerknives.com 
daniel@winklerknives.com 

Richard S. Wright 

www.richardswright.com 

rswswitchblades@hotmail.com 



■StKSiffTKs] ^©©DSDKlS 




nirM .«. M |lWIBCOtO« 

By BLADE® staff 

New Knives Annual Rocks! 



Nowhere are more handmade knives showcased- 
and in full color — than in Knives 2006 



102 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Golden Rod; 



Nirvana might he like 
Paved &" ab "« *»"f 

r:/" r --Ss„ B g"ai 
^/^£"-££: 

Kmfemakers, reaching fcr 
be „?i u , en ri ° £ buiU k »ive s t 

lavs and , s ° den oy er- 

T a " d undertones, i„ se t and 

---^s-gitf- 

a» gold a., the ,„„'"'""' 
the waning .vca^^.f*™ as 

sr™g^d^; k T t»-'S 

me k„,f e ,„ dlI8hy 3tand 



*iSt SIS f»«»e good 
l««r, and high c Tas s ' Pr03Perit5 '' 



JoeKertgman 



the tadd»r, Pa tt.rn h ^"Popping P e r sian wasn , t 



if 



SSS--='^:=s:-^- 



Last year was a banner year for the 
Knives annual — for the first time 
ever, it was published completely in 
full color, and sales of the book skyrocketed 
as a result. Knifemakers were happy, collec- 
tors welcomed the change and retail knife 
store owners, dealers and online book sell- 
ers reordered more copies than ever before 
in the history of the Knives annual. 

Letters poured into the F&W Publica- 
tions editorial offices from readers who said 
they've been collecting every edition of the 
Knives annual since its inception more than 
25 years ago, and that Knives 2005 was the 
most handsome and comprehensive book to 
date. 

Edited by BLADE* Managing Editor 
Joe Kertzman, Knives 2006 won't disappoint 
the masses. In addition to showcasing the 
newest, hottest, most intricate and exquisite 
handmade knives on the planet, it boasts the 
world's largest directory of handmade knife- 
makers, including their addresses, phone 
numbers, email and website addresses, spe- 
cialties, technical information, patterns of 
knives they make, prices, years they sold 
their first knives, tang stamps and more. 

Between the covers are feature articles 



* JEROME ANDERS' G*! * ■, ^ , 
MM.. tHo,, m „ pl ,2) """"*»«•<'»• 

STATE OF THE ART 139 



penned by some of the best knife writers in 
the industry. Richard D. White asks read- 
ers to check out the world-class folding 
knives that commemorated the 1933 Chi- 
cago World's Fair; Roger Combs examines 
the ease and convenience of buying hand- 
made knives from the Internet; Dexter Ew- 
ing pays an overdue tribute to the Emerson 
CQC-7, more than a decade after the tacti- 
cal folder took the knife industry by storm; 
and Greg Bean peruses the fine edges of the 
Philippines. 

Flipping the pages, Evan F Nappen 
poses the question of whether daggers are 
sporting knives; Mac Overton lets readers 
know that laminated blades loom large; 
James Ayres tells how he managed to sur- 
vive hard times thanks to a knife of "sing- 
ing steel" he bought at the House Of Arago- 
rn; the lady knife writer Linda Moll Smith 
explains why neck knives are more than 
just jewelry; and Rod Halvorsen challenges 
novices to try his rudimentary yet effective 
methods of making knives. 

The "Trends" section of Knives 2006 
showcases "Black-Lip And Abalone Blades," 
those outfitted with pink, green, black, blue, 
red, orange and yellow handles that only na- 



Onion 

Model 1079 

MSRP $99.95 

Steel ,D2 tool steel with 

Black Teflon 8 coating 
Handle...Double-injection-molded 

Santoprene 8 

(glass filled nylon) 

Blade 10 in. (25.4 cm) 

Overall.,,16 in. (40.6 cm)^|E | 
Weight...22.0 oz. /■ 
Includes Kydex® 
sheath 




ktrskoNT 

K N i vm E s 



For information or a dealer near you, call: 1-800-325-2891 
www.kershawknives.com 

Kershaw Ken Onion knives are covered by US Patent Numbers: 
5,802,722 • 6,145,202 ■ 6,338,431 ■ 6,397,476 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 103 



kerslvxw 



A PROCUT EXCLUSIVE 



1600 ST 



__ CUpoo 
A GoMAfodeb 



1-800-356-8507 

Fax 562-803-4261 

email info @procutdist.com 



SSJCUT 



trend tracking 

ture, and a few knifemakers, could produce. 
The knives in "Full Frontier Fashion" look 
as though they just leaped off the big screen 
of a Western movie. 

Other edged pieces have "Burl-esque" 
handles, including wood grains even Paul 
Bunyon wouldn't have fathomed. There are 
"True Tacticals," "Bird, Trout and Bambi 
Blades," "Fast-Track Folders," "Customary 
Pocketknives" and "Hordes of Swords." 

As if that wasn't enough, the "State Of 
The Art" section of Knives 2006 displays, in 
full color, knives fashioned by artistically in- 
clined makers. Such beauties include "Hued 
Blue And Honed True" knives; "Pin & Ink" 
(scrimshawed) pieces; "Scenic Steel;" "Be- 
zels And Bevels;" "Knive Wires;" and a 
chapter titled "Golden Rods," from which 
the following excerpt is taken: 



When imagining what 
Nirvana might be like, 
people get faraway 
looks in their eyes and talk about 
streets paved in gold. In describing 
row upon row of wheat, stretching 
as far as the eye can see, folks often 
refer to "fields of gold." If you want 
to accomplish a goal, you "reach for 
the golden ring," a phrase dating 
back to when kids practically 
stretched their arms out of their 
sockets trying to snag a golden ring 
on early merry-go-rounds. A "gold 




104 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



digger" is someone who marries for 
money, and a "golden child" is one 
born into prosperity or destined for 
greatness. 

Knifemakers, reaching for the 
golden ring, build knives as beautiful 
as streets paved in gold and fields of 
golden wheat. The edged objects 
are gold inlaid and encrusted, given 
golden overlays and undertones, 
inset and adorned with good old 
fashioned gold — gold that's as gold 
as honey, as gold as the sun, as 
golden as the waning years of a long- 
lasting marriage. These knives pay 
tribute to gold itself. They represent 
1800s prospectors with big dreams 
and strong backbones. The golden 
rods of the knife industry stand for 
dreams, whether broken or fulfilled. 
They symbolize the good things in 
life — wealth, prosperity, luxury and 
high class. 



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£§g^ 23rd Annual 

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March 24-26, 2006 




Friday - 3 p.m.-8 p.m. 

Saturday - 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Sunday - 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



Janesville, WI* 

Holiday Inn Express & 
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One of the finest regional shows in the 
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custom knives, factory knives, antique 
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Displays - Silent Auction - Door Prizes 

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trend tracking 

They attract, not gold diggers, 
not golden children, but collectors 
with sophisticated tastes and deep 
pocketbooks. Knives parading 
golden exteriors put glimmers in all 
our eyes. They are as stunning as 
a rain-soaked valley during sunrise, 
birds chirping their morning tunes, 
leaves blowing in the wind, sunrays 
peeking through tree 



branches and creating sporadic 
golden spotlights on green grasses. 
They can be likened to hillsides of 
goldenrod on hot summer days. 

Knives 2006 is available through KP 
Books, 700 E. State St., Ma, WI 54990 
800.258.0929 www.krausebooks.com. The 
cost is $24.99, plus $4 shipping to U.S. ad- 
dresses. Ask for offer KJMK. 




106 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



THE PINNACLE OF KNIFE 

Legend ^Lore* ♦ ♦ 




26TH ANNUAL mm£% 

i m w $ 








Mail your order and payment to: 

krause publications 

An imprint of F+W Publications, Inc. 

Offer KDHK 

P.O. Box 5009, lola, Wl 54945-5009 



Knives 2006 is part annual report, part family album, and 
part address book - all wrapped up in an ultra cool and 
colorful package! Packed in the pages of this new edition is 
1 ,000 of the finest handcrafted knives on earth showcased 
in spectacular color photos, multiple directories listing 
information for major knife organizations and knifemakers, 
plus informative and entertaining articles from some of the 
best knife writers in the world. 

This book provides an easy-to-follow index that separates the 
knives into Trends, State of the Art and Factory Trends, with 
an introduction included at the beginning of each. Woven 
throughout the full-color knife sections are feature articles 
that cover various elements of the cutlery world. 



Softcover • 8-1/4 x 10-7/8 • 304 pages 



1,000+ color photos 



ltem# KN2006 • $24.99 



"Our brethren in the knife 
fraternity, the folks at Krause 
Publications, have done it again! 

With Joe Kertzman's skillful editing, this book, as 
earlier ones in the series since it began in 1981 
have been, is a major contribution to the library of 
knife lore and legend... It is a veritable feast for 
the eyes and mind of anyone interested in knives, 
whether that interest is mild or intense!" 

- Review by Mac Overton 



Call tO Order tOday 800-258-0929 M-F 7am - 8pm • Sat. 8am- 2pm, CST- Offer KDHK 



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edge testers 



TWO BENCHSTONES 

INONE 

See how the DMT DuoSharp performs 



The DuoSharp features a diamond-coated sharp- 
ening surface with a different grit on each side, 
and is available in grit combinations of fine/extra 
fine, coarse/extra coarse and fine/coarse. The 
large dot at the end lip of the DuoSharp stone 
denotes the grit. The matrix of dots assists in 
collecting the fines — tiny 
^. particles that are abraded 
off as part of the sharp- 
. ening process — and 
keeping them away 

from the 
l diamond-coated 
steel surface. 










The DuoBase stand 
permits the user to 
secure the DuoSharp 
on, and raise it above, 
the working surface for 
a 2-inch clearance. 



108 /BLADE 



troke the 
blade its full 
length across 
the surface of 
the stone away 
from your body, 
alternating 
each side and 
using the same 
number of 
strokes per 
side. The knife 
is the Double 
Duty double- 
action folder 
from Lone Wolf 
Knives. Blade 
steel: CPM 
S30V stainless. 













^H 












^^ 
















4 
















CVHHf 




blademag.com 





MARCH 2006 



Every now and then a 
product comes along that 
is an improvement over 
an older, existing one. Such is 
the case with Diamond Machin- 
ing Technology's (DMT) 
DuoSharp benchstones. 

DMT has a longstanding 
company tradition and reputa- 
tion of designing and building 
the best diamond sharpening 
tools on the market. The value 
and versatility of the DuoSharp 
further solidifies that tradition. 

The DuoSharp features a 
double-sided, diamond-coated 
sharpening surface, so in 
essence you get two bench- 
stones in one! The DuoSharps 
are available in two sizes: 8x2 
5/8x3/8 and 10x4x3/8 inches. 

For those unfamiliar with 
DMT sharpeners, the polka-dot 
pattern on the company's bench- 
stones and folding files is a 
patented feature. The matrix of 
dots assists in collecting the 
fines — tiny particles that are abraded off as 
part of the sharpening process — and keep- 
ing them away from each hone's diamond- 
coated steel surface. 

The DuoSharps are available in 
diamond-grit combinations of fine/extra 
fine, coarse/extra coarse and fine/coarse. 

"The DMT 
DuoSharp is pretty 
much the ultimate 
in diamond bench- 
stones." 

— the author 



DMT employs a color-coded system to 
determine the grit. The color code for a 
fine-grit sharpener is red, extra coarse is 
black, coarse is blue and extra fine is green. 
However, since there are two grits in 
each DuoSharp, the color system does not 
work, so DMT employs a different color — 
yellow — and adds a large dot at the end lip 
of the DuoSharp stone in which a corre- 
sponding color dot is inlaid. The color on 
the surface denotes the grit. Once you 
learn DMT's color-coding system, which is 
uniform throughout the entire line, it is 
easy to select at a quick glance the proper 
grit of DuoSharp needed for your sharpen- 
ing task. 

Sharp Time 

For this review, DMT sent me two models 
of the 10-inch DuoSharp in fine/extra fine 
MARCH 2006 blademag.com 




\ T/A/\\ 1 Marlborough, I 
According to DMT, the angle of the 
blade to the benchstone should be 
about 20 degrees. The knife 
Double Duty double-action folder 
from Lone Wolf Knives. Blade steel: 
CPM S30V stainless. 



and coarse/extra coarse grits. The company 
also included its DuoBase accessory, 
which enables you to secure the DuoSharp 
on, and raise it above, the working surface 
for a 2-inch clearance. (Elevating the stone 
a bit makes sharpening somewhat easier.) 

I tried the DuoSharp on various 
knives — kitchen knives with good steel, 
hunting/survival knives of quality steel, 
and tactical knives of high-performance 
stainless steel. As expected, the DuoSharps 
produced the quickest, quality edge in the 
least amount of time with the kitchen 
knives that had 400 series stainless steel 
blades. I could easily bring back severely 
dull edges by starting out with the extra 
coarse, and then bringing the coarse side 
into play, followed by the fine-grit and 
finishing up with the extra fine. 

The 10-inch DuoSharp excelled at 
taming large knives, fixed blades namely. 1 
was able to free-hand sharpen several 
small utility knives for a friend who 



Sharp Chart 



Sharpener DuoSharp 
Company Diamond Machining 
Technology 

Sharpener Type Benchstone 
Sizes 8x2 5/8x3/8 and 10x4x3/8 
inches 

Sharpening Medium Diamond grit 
Grit Sizes Fine/extra fine, 
coarse/extra coarse and fine/coarse 
MSRP $99 (8x 2 5/8x3/8) and 
$106.25 (10x4x3/8) (includes non- 
skid mat) 




Mother 

of 
Pearl 
a? Company 



Pearl slabs including; 

white, gold, pink, black, brown & abalone 

OTHER MATERIALS; 

Jig, Pick, Smooth & Stag Bone 
in a variety of colors & patterns: 
Mosaic Abalone Buffalo & 
Ram's Horn, Stingray Skins, 
Wallets & Belts. 



See Us At: 

Safari Club International 

Reno, NV 

January 18-21, 2006 

Arkansas Custom Knife Show 

Little Rock, AR 

February 4-5, 2006 

Las Vegas Antique Arms & 
Sporting Arms Show 
February 10-12, 2006 



Catalog send $5.00 or download from our 
Web site to: 

Mother of Pearl Company 

P.O. Box 445, Franklin, JVC 28744 

Phone (828) 524-6842 

Fax (828) 369-7809 

imuw.knifehandles.com 

www.stingrayproducts.com 



Terms: 

C.O.D. • Prepayment • MC/VISA 



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your online source for auctomatics 




$ $35 



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WWW.SWITCHBLADEKING.COM 
1-877-825-7790 

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BLADE/ 109 



<Hen & Rooster® 

^ World's Finest Since 1845 
Celebrating 160 Years 






1845-2005 



First Established in 
Solingen, Germany 
in 1845, the Hen & Rooster* 
trademark is renowned as one 
of the world's finest cutlery 
brands. In celebration of the 
1 60th Anniversary of Hen & 
Rooster*, we are proud to 
present this exquisite com- 
memorative Crown Stag Bowie. 
This beautiful collectors piece 
features laser engraved stain- 
less steel blade with genuine 
gold plating. Each knife is a 
serialized limited edition of 
only 300 pieces. Be one of the 
few to own this historical piece, 
and ask your salesperson about 
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availble only through 
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SPrest *Qutlery 

CALL US FOR 

A DEALER IN YOUR AREA: 

1-800-251-7768 

or visit our web site atwww.knifesalesinfo.com 







iW&SFMM 



edge testers 

specializes in custom leatherwork. The 
large stone sitting on the DuoBase simpli- 
fied the challenging and somewhat tedious 
task, and helped me produce high-quality 
results in a minimum amount of time. 
Moreover, steels such as CPM S30V, 
154CM and ATS-34— the high-perform- 
ance stainless varieties — were easy to 
sharpen on the diamond medium. 

The DuoBase 

The DuoBase is a plastic structure that 
secures either size of DuoSharp, or any 
brand of 6x2-inch benchstone. Trust me, 
the DuoBase, while available at an addi- 
tional cost ($16.95), is a must have for 
anyone who buys a DuoSharp. Not only 
does it give you the aforementioned 2-inch 
clearance, but the bottom of the DuoBase 
features a molded-in handle that enables 
you to employ the DuoSharp as a large, 
overgrown file to work on such big items 
as lawnmower blades, axes and other 
garden tools. It is very neat and quite 
versatile! 



"Steels such as 

CPM S30V, 154CM 

and ATS-34 were 

easy to sharpen on 

the diamond 

medium." 
— the author 



The DuoBase secures the DuoSharp 
via two large plastic clips on either end of 
the DuoBase surface. The clips snap into 
place inside corresponding slots so that 
there is zero play of the DuoSharp once it 
is locked into place. What's more, round 
rubber doughnuts on the bottom of each 
DuoBase ensure that it stays put when used 
on a flat, smooth surface. If you choose not 
to buy the DuoBase, each DuoSharp 
comes with a free, non-skid mat. 

Final Grade 

Overall, the DMT DuoSharp is pretty 
much the ultimate in diamond bench- 
stones. If you are serious about sharpening 
knives, it is a must. 

For more information contact Diamond 
Machining Technology, attn: Christine 
Miller, Dept. BL3, 85 Hayes Memorial, 
Marlborough, MA 01752 800.666.4DMT 
www. dmtsharp. com. 



110 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Kanetsune Seki, one of the best master craftsmen in Japan, 
continues the 800-year-old history of Japanese sword-making. 



Jci-den" is the secret method of Japanese sword-making that has been passed down to 
our present age from 800 years ago. Mr Kanetsune Seki, one of the finest master craftsmen 
in Japan, preserves the traditions behind the secret art of "seki-den", the process which 
give birth to the sharpest of Japanese swords that hardly ever break or bend. The famous 
knives made by Kanetsune Seki remain true to the master craftsman's highly reputable name 
in^ermsiof their delicate feel, aura of dignity, stately presence, and absolute sharpness. 



; 





F 



Ls®W®m® SEOT SEKW, Booth #7273,Get your free DVD & catalogue! 
They' 11 explain the whole history of "KANETSUNE" . ^ 



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BLADE LENGTH 3.54 in. BLADE LENGTH 4.72in. BLADE LENGTH 10.63 in. 



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5-1-1 l,Sakae-machi, Seki City,Gifu Pref., JAPAN 501-3253 



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BLUE STEEL [ 



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The knives crafted by the master Kanetsune Seki using the 800-year-old history of Japanese sword-making 
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pleased to provide you with these amazingly sharp and easy-to-use knives. 



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NEXT ISSUE 



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LEADING ' "'! 
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DIAMOND MACHINING TECHNOLOGY 

85 Hayes Memorial Drive Marlborough, MA 01752 USA 

800.666.4DMT www.dmtsharp.com 



MADE 

in USA 



Keys To The Best 

Hamons 

Hottest Knives 

of the Hottest 

Makers 

Rating The Latest 

"V" Sharpeners 

I 

Integrals: One- 
Piece Wonders 

The Tunstall B~ 

Leather or Kydex: 
Which One & Why 

What To Do When 
You're Busted for 
an "Illegal Knife" 



112 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



ALIAS I & ALIAS 



Lanyard Hole 



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KEY POINTS 



Cusickti details including anodized barrel back-sweats and 
machined thumb ireads cm the Irlanium monotosk bat. 



FEATURE 
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FEATURE 
BENEFIT 



FEATURE 
BENEFIT 



FEATURE 
BENEFIT 



S30V Blade Steel 
Premium Steel: Toughness. 

Edge Retention, Corrosion 
Resistance 

6AL4V Titanium Handle 
Lightweight. Durable, 
Corrosion Resistant Material 

Titanium Monolock; Simple 
Function, Extreme Strength 

Large Sleek Carry-Clip 
Rides Low in Itie Pocket 






^V' 



*«* 






Blade Material 


S30V Stainless Steel Hardened to Sfl-GOHRC 


Blade Lengih 


1 3.6 lf:2,95T.50crn) 


Blade Thickness 


I; t2D" (3.0Smm) II: 0.120" (3.05mm) 


Length Open 


1: 8,25" (20.95cm) II: &MT (17.27cm) 


Length Closed 


1:4.75" (12.07cm) II: 3.B7" (9.B3cmj 


Weight 


■ 23gm) 11: 3.000? (85. Q5fl mi 


Handle Material 


Bead Blast GAL iV-Titanium Scales; Blue Amortized Aluminum 
Barrel Spacers; Removable Stainless Steel Carry-Clip 


Handle Thickness 


1: 0.420* (1,07cm) M: 0.402" (1.02cm) 


Lock Mechanism 


Monolock 


O lade Style 4 Opener 


Modified Spear-PolnL Anodized Aluminum Thumb-Stud 



Available Configurations; 



Both models available in plain edge, stone wash blade 
finish only 



Dealers call or visit www.mgegroup.com 
for pricing 

Steve Rhodes Kevin Stanley 

800-734-5965 800-563-3345 



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800-728-9208 



Jim Hansen 

888-270-0880 



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Currently Distributed by 
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capture 

capturecTci 


! 


i 


Mm 



I 



H lucky subscriber unwittingly entered lb "Capture H Case Collection Sweepstakes." landing a booty of blades 



By BLADE® staff 





M.rSL 3. A 



The Case Family Brands Encyclopedia Set chronicles the his- 
tory of the cutlery companies owned by members of the Case 
family during the last two centuries. Each volume contains 
knives in a leather-wrapped box that resembles an encyclopedia. 
Also included are several pages of history about each company. 



Fred Roberts, winner of the "Capture A Case Collection Sweep- 
stakes," stands alongside all seven knife volumes, including 58 
knives, that are part of a Case encyclopedia set he won. BLADE® 
and W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery sponsored the contest, with ads 
for the sweepstakes running in issues of the magazine and on 
the website — www.blademag.com. 



t&CtJfLERY<! 







MUST BUS BOX BY 
1-30M SATURDAY! 



ame of the BLADE® reader who won 
'Capture A Case Collection Sweep- 
stakes" was drawn at the 2005 BLADE Show 
West in Portland, Oregon. John Sullivan of 
W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. draws the 
name of the lucky winner — Fred Roberts — 
from a drum set up at the Case booth. 



"t's not every day that you win a seven-vol- 
ume set of leather-wrapped boxes resem- 
.bling encyclopedias, each filled with thick, 
cut-out "pages" embedded with Case folding 
knives — a grand total of 58 knives in all! 

But that's just what happened to one lucky 
BLADE® reader who, upon renewing his sub- 
scription, didn't realize he was automatically 
entered in the "Capture A Case Collection 
Sweepstakes." Fred Roberts of Johnston City, 
Illinois, is the lucky reader whose name was 
' awn from more than 14,000 contest entries. 
BLADE and W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery 
onsored the contest, with ads for the sweep- 
stakes running in issues of the magazine and 
on the website — www.blademag.com. 

"I saw the ads in BLADE, and when I 
renewed my subscription, I intended to read 
the ad more carefully," Roberts says. "I didn't 
know that, by renewing my subscription, I had 
automatically entered the contest. Then, every 
month when I paid my credit card bill, it re- 
minded me and I thought, 'Man, 1 should have 
entered that contest.'" 

"The sweepstakes was launched at the 
2004 BLADE Show in Atlanta, and last year's 
BLADE Show West [Sept. 30 through Oct. 2, 
2005] provided a last chance for folks to get 
their names in the drawing," says Rose Kils- 
donk, manager of consumer marketing for 
BLADE and F&W Publications. 



"Between those dates, full-page ads were 
run each month in BLADE, and the website 
had a 'Capture a Case Sweepstakes' button, 
which was a quick way to enter," she notes. 

In all, there were 14,540 contest entrants, 
and of those, 1 ,700 people registered for the 
sweepstakes via the website. Only one name 
was drawn at the 2005 BLADE Show West, 
and the lucky winner is Roberts. Though he 
wasn't at the show, the winner did not need to 
be present to win the contest. 

"All of our contests are 'no purchase nec- 
essary,' and any opportunity for entering the 
contest could be done independently of sub- 
scribing," Kilsdonk ensures. 

Roberts remembers the day he received 
a phone call telling him that he'd won the 
sweepstakes — Monday, Oct. 3, 2005. 

"When Rose called to tell me I'd won, I 
thought she was a telemarketer," Roberts re- 
lates. "I thought, 'Here I just renewed my sub- 
scription, and someone's calling me.' I wished 
I hadn't answered the phone until she said the 
word 'sweepstakes,' and my ears perked up. 

"I wasn't going to let myself get too en- 
thused until I had the knives in hand," he adds. 
"It didn't really hit me that I'd won until I got 
them, and then I was in shock. I never won 
anything of any value before that." 

A limited edition of 350 sets, the Case 
Family Brands Encyclopedia Set chronicles 



114 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



the history of the cutlery companies owned 
by members of the Case family during the last 
two centuries. 

Fifty-eight knives in the seven-volume 
set are branded with the names of the fam- 
ily-owned Case knife companies: Case Broth- 
ers Cutlery Co.; Cattaraugus Cutlery Co.; C. 
Plate' Sons Cutlery Co.; Little Valley Knife 
Association/Crandall Cutlery Co.; John D. 
Case Sons Co./Kane Cutlery/Case Manufac- 
turing Co.; Kinfolks, Inc./Standard Knife Co.; 
and W.R. Case & Sons Cutlery Co. 

Each volume contains knives with tang 
stamps and shields from the respective com- 
pany featured within the covers. The leather- 
wrapped box that resembles an encyclopedia 
includes several pages of history about that 
company, and each knife is serial numbered. 

"It's a great set and I do have a lot more 
appreciation for Case," says Roberts. 

"I talked to John Sullivan of Case about 
how best to preserve the knives," he adds. "1 
want the knives to hold their value, and if 1 
can find some way to display the knives safe- 
ly, I will. Until then, I'll show one volume at 
a time to certain individuals. I don't foresee 
ever breaking up the set." 

For more information on the Case Fam- 
ily Brands Encyclopedia Set, contact W.R. 
Case & Sons Cutlery Co., attn: J. Sullivan, 
Dept. BL3, Owens Way, Bradford, PA 16701 
814.368.4123 www.wrcase.com. 



Handmade - One At A Time 




J. & Tess Neilson 

Neilson's Mountain Hollow 

RR2 Box 16,Wyalusing, PA 18853 

570.746.4944 or visit us at www.mountainhollow.net 



Ed Wormser www.Icgendaryknifcmakers.com j| m CharnaS 

847-757-9926 W £ gTjy C I, I, E CT I N $ 708 " 302 - 5960 



Loveless 



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VISIT 



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SHOW 

BOOTH 
#1601 




MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 115 




A hamon (temper line) dissects the 
10x2-inch recurve blade of W-2 tool 
steel on Adam's camp knife. The 
handle is amboina burl and the guard 
is blued-silicon bronze. His list price 
for a similar knife: $800. 



116/ BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 



Last year, Adam Des Rosiers came out 
of nowhere to qualify for the 2005 
ABS World Championship Cutting 
Competition at the BLADE Show, finishing 
second to defending champ Reggie Barker. 
Not bad for a first-timer in the event! It was 
a meteoric rise for the young bladesmith, 
whose talent both using and making knives 
has thrust him into the limelight of the 
handmade knife scene. 

Born and raised in Alaska, Adam was 
given his first knife when he was only 3, so his 
fascination with sharp blades began early. At 
10, he received a W-49 Western bowie made 
from carbon steel. The knife accompanied 
him when he worked as a deckhand with 
his dad on commercial fishing boats. During 
the many hours Adam spent in the woods 
with his brother, the knife was at his side. It 
was then that he learned a big bowie is an 
excellent tool in the woods. 

After high school, Adam attended 
college to study boat building and then 
joined the merchant marine. From there he 
took a job running the docks for a major 
salmon processor. After the fishing season 
was over, he headed to Arizona. Living and 
working near the ocean, then moving to the 
hot, dry desert had a profound impact on 
him. He needed something to do. 

In search of a hobby, Adam talked to 
bladesmith Keith Framlin, who suggested he 
look into the courses offered by the American 
Bladesmith Society. Adam accessed the ABS 
website and signed up for a two-week course. 
His first instructor was ABS master smith 
Dickie Robinson, who taught forging and 
grinding. "The eight hours a day of forging 
and grinding was the best thing that ever 
happened to me," Adam recalls. 

His next instructor was ABS master smith 
Kevin Cashen, who gave Adam an excellent 



Adam Des Rosiers 

adam@alaskablades.com 

www.alaskablades.com 

907.209.6832 



Specialties Fixed blades, including 
bowies, hunters and more 
Steels O-l, L-6, W-2 and 15N20; 
damascus 

Handles A number of materials, 
including desert ironwood, curly or 
burl maple, walrus ivory and oosic 
Miscellaneous Stainless steel for 
guards, though he has used nickel 
silver and brass as well; does very 
little embellishment other than file- 
work and some handle carving; fu- 
ture plans include folders, swords 
and learning how to engrave 
Newsworthy Adam finished second 
in the 2005 ABS World Champion- 
ship Cutting Competition 
List Prices $200-$l, 500 
Delivery Time Eight months to 
a year 




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Tel: (972) 935-0899 • Fax: (972) 937-9004 - Catalog $3.00 

Web: http://www.osborneknive.com E-mail: ossiel ©worldnet.att.net 



MARCH 2006 



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BLADE/ 117 



Scales, Rolls, Tapers, Carvers, Crowns & Gun grips. 




Scales in all sizes available: 51/2x11/2-5x11/2-4 1/2 x 1 1/2 - 4 1/2 x 1 1/4 -41/4x11/4-3 1/2 x 1 



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To test the edge holding of his blades, 
Adam cuts leather, paper, cardboard 
and rope with chopping and slicing 
motions. The blade of his hunter is a 
tooth-pattern damascus of 0-1 and L-6 
tool steels. The handle is ancient walrus 
ivory with a blued-steel guard and pin, 
and copper and black spacers. His list 
price for a similar piece: $600. 




grasp of metallurgy. He was then fortunate 
enough to get invited to stay a third week 
with ABS master smith John Fitch. Adam 
credits all three smiths with giving him 
enough information and inspiration to start 
making knives. 

I met Adam at the 2005 BLADE Show 
and was immediately impressed with the 
ergonomics of his knife handles. The grinds 
of his blades are crisp and clean; the fit and 
finish belie his short time as a knifemaker. 
His knives seem to have the influence of 
the Alaskan outdoors. They are simple but 
designed to complete the chore at hand in 
a professional, efficient manner. In fact, 
Adam's Sitka Hunter, a utilitarian knife with 
nothing wasted, was one of the exceptional 
values at the show. 

He is no different than other makers in 
one respect; he gives credit where credit is 
due. For the fine fit and finish of his knives, 
he acknowledges ABS journeyman smith 
Jason Knight. ABS journeyman smith Dan 
Farr (for more on Dan and his competition 
cutting knives, see the story on page 58) and 
ABS master smith Jim Rodebaugh also have 
helped him improve. 

Adam makes several styles, though his 
favorites are high-performance hunters and 
camp knives. He works primarily with carbon 
steels such as 0-1, L-6, W-2 and 15N20. His 
choice for guard material is stainless steel, 
though he has opted for nickel silver and 
brass as well. He employs many materials for 



118 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 





handles but prefers desert ironwood, curly 
or burl maple, walrus ivory and oosic. He 
makes fixed blades only and does very little 
embellishment other than filework and some 
handle carving. His future plans include 
folders, swords and learning how to engrave. 
Each knife comes with a custom leather 
sheath of his make. 

Before affixing the handle to one of his 
knives, Adam flex tests the edge of the blade. 
To administer the flex test, he holds a brass rod 
in the vertical position and pushes the edge 
against the rod. If the edge returns to shape, 
the heat treat was done correctly. To test edge 
holding, he cuts leather, paper, cardboard and 
rope with chopping and slicing motions. To 
test his big bowies and choppers, he cuts into 




and chops moose antlers and brass rods. 

A favorite activity of Adam's is the 
cutting competitions. His first contest was 
at the Northwest Knife Expo. A week later, 
he competed at the Piney Woods Hammer- 
In in Old Washington, Arkansas, where he 
placed second. He won the competition at 
Jim Batson's Bladesmithing Symposium in 
Bessemer, Alabama, securing a spot in the 
2005 ABS World Championship Cutting 
Competition at the BLADE Show. The 
competition, as the name implies, had the 
"best of the best" vying for the title. 

Adam admits that one of his goals is to 
win the World Championship. When asked 
why he participates in the competitions, he 
said that he gains an incredible amount of 



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BLADE/ 119 




JOIN some of the 

WORLD'S FINEST 

Knifemaker/Artisans 

February 18th-19th, 2006 

Silverado Resort & Country Club 
in the heart of the Napa Valley 



Saturday: From 10 AM - 5 PM 

• Knifemakers' & Artists' Displays, 
Offering Buying Opportunities 

• Seminars & Sharpening Demos - Led 
by Bob Kramer and Murray Carter 

• Judging of Artisans' Objects for Awards 



Sunday: From 10 AM - 3 PM 

• Knifemakers' & Artists' Displays, 
Offering Buying Opportunities 

• Drawings for multiple valuable Objects 

• Prior to the Show: Jot Singh Khalsa 
will lead a Yoga-Stretching Hour 



Saturday, from 7 PM on: Awards Banquet & Damascus Round Table 
Chaired by Daryl Meier and Bill Fiorini 





Attending Makers/Exhibitors 




Gaetan Beauchamp 


Bill Burke 


Murray Carter 


Kevin Cashen 


Darriel Caston 


Don Cowles 


John Davis 


Christoph Deringer 


Adam DesRosiers 


Matt Diskin 


Tom Ferry 


Bill Fiorini 


Ric Furrer 


Chantal Gilbert 


Thomas Haslinger 


JP Holmes 


Jot Singh Khalsa 


Todd kinnikiii 


Daniel Koster 


Bob Kramer 


Jerry McClure 


Daryl Meier 


Mardi Meshejian 


Mike Mooney 


Rob Patton 


Dan Pfanenstiel 


Kirk Rexroat 


James Rodebaugh 


Charles Sauer 


Karl Schroen 


John M. Smith 


Bob Weinstock 


Owen Wood 


Tim Wright 


BladeGallery.Com 


KnifePurveyor.Com 



One-day Pass: $9.00 - Two-day Pass: $15.00 
All Events Pass - including Banquet & Round Table: $85.00 

Visit our Web site @ www.collectors-show.com 

For additional Show Information, please contact: 
John Greene @ 530-637-5387 • email: collectorsshow@foothill.net 
Accepting Artists' Applications/Work to be juried for next Year's Show... 

We look forward to seeing you in Napa for this unique Event!!! 

The Co factors' S How 

rt and Culinary 'Worlds with 'line Cutlery 




information not only from his own experience, 
but from the other competitors as well. There 
are many types of cuts performed in the 
contests, along with an array of materials that 
are cut. The competitions are an excellent 
barometer of the performance level of the 
participants' knives. 

In addition to his standard line of knives, 
Adam accepts some custom orders. His 
prices range from $200 for a simple folder 
up to $1,500 for a damascus bowie. Delivery 
time is eight months to a year. 

Besides the BLADE Show, he also 
attends The Collectors Show and plans 
to add BLADE Show West and the Bay 
Area Knife Collectors Association Show 
to his schedule. He tries to attend as many 
hammer-ins as his work schedule allows. He 
is focused on what he wants to accomplish 
and puts forth the effort necessary each day 
to attain his goals. Ultimately, he would like 
to become an ABS master smith and remain 
a full-time knifemaker. 

Adam has burst onto the handmade 
scene with little fanfare. His knives are well 
made and provide an excellent value for the 
money — typical of today's new breed of up- 
and-coming maker. He brings an exceptional 
combination of experience and desire to the 
world of knives, including a vast amount of 
outdoor knife use and the desire to increase 
the performance of his blades. Whether it is to 
add to your collection or for your next hunting 
or fishing trip, 1 highly recommend that you 
consider buying a knife from Adam. His 
knives are born and bred for the outdoors. 







Adam's full-tang integral hunter sports 




a blade of 5160 carbon steel, a curly 




maple handle and nickel-silver pins. His 




list price for a similar knife: $300. 






a ■ 




^* l£ 




^ jy 






/ 






^^^^91^ 





120 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Website: 
www.knifemaking.com 



JAIHTZ SUPPLY 

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Your 'source' for knifemaking suppties 

ALL AT THE BEST PRICES! Add $8.05 per order for shipping. 



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WEEKEND PROJECT KITS 

Include 440C Stainless blade, handle 
material, pins and instructions. 
RENAISSANCE DAGGER KIT 



OvjteiII Icnalb is ft 1/4" 



SS167K Renaissance Kit.. 



ass 



COBRA KIT 

Overall lenKth is 7 3/8" 



SSIfiAK conraMl 11.95 

SPORTSMAN KIT 

Overall length is 7 3/8" 



5 






SS164K Sportsman Kit 12.95 

LETTER OPENER KIT 

Overall length is 8 1/2" 

SS2ft1 k Letter upener Kit .9.95 

FISHERMAN'S FILLET KIT 

Sharp, utAiuii. >id,i»v» »re^j wlade is 
12" overall. Easy to make. 

SSI99K Fisherman Kit 9.95 

ALASKAN FILLET KIT 

Surgical steel blade lb" overall. Easy to 

make. 

SS912K Alaskan Kit 11.95 



LEATHER HONING BELTS 

Use wilh while rcjuue lo sharpen and polish. 

AU200 I x 30 Leather Bell 9.95 

AG201 1 x42 Lealher Bell 1135 

FELT POLISHING BELTS 

Use wilh mugc or other compounds tor 
polishing, 

KS501 I"x30" Fell 12.50 

KS502 r p x42" Fell 14.50 

KS503 T\1T Fell 16.50 

SATIN BRITK BELTS 
Quick and easy way to Satin finish a 
blade. Specify coarse, medium or line 
when ordering. 

CN1.TO I"x30" 9.95 

CN142 l"x42" 10.95 

cmnvKiv 15.95 



RIVETS AND 
DRILLS 



*/ 



C'orhy lype rivets are precision machined 
of solid brass 5/16" heads s tolled for easy 
installation. 

Cutlery lype rivels available in brass or 
nickle silver wilh 5/16" heads and 1/2" 
shanks. Use RD3 for corny riveLs or RD4 
for cutlery rivets for perfect countersink 
and alignment 

CP601 Pkg. 12 Corbv Rivets 14.64 

RD3 Corhy Rivet Drill 24.95 

RV12S Pkjj. 25 Brass Cutlery 4.95 

RV125 Pkjj. 25 Nickle Silver Cutlery 5.50 
RD4 Cutlery Rivet Drill ...24.95 



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Standard Panavise with 360 u )a 

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CUSTOM KITS 

l"hc kits below include stainless stisc! pre-shaped 
blade, brass rivets, tubing, guard and handle 
malerial and slep-by-slep instruclkms. 

WASHITA HUNTER 



SS463 Washita Blade only 21.95 

SS463K Washila Kit .30.25 



SIOUX HUNTER 



7 W overall wilh 3 ntade 

SS458 Sioux Blade «nlv 19.95 

SS458K Complete Kit 2S.95 



APACHE HUNTER 



H 1/4" overall wilh .1 1/2" hljuic 

SMI, I Apache Blade only.... 19.95 

SS461K CSmplete Kit .: 2S.9S 

CHEYENNE HUNTER 



L > l/S" ovL-rall with 4 1/2 elude 

SS495 Chevenne Blade onlv 19.95 

SS495K Complete Kit .". 2K.95 



RAW SKINNER 



7 1/3" overall wilh r blade 

SS7K2 Kuw Blade onlv 24.95 

SS7S2K Complete Kit.: 32.6S 

NAVA.IO SKINNER 



8 7/R" overall wilh 4 1/4" Made 
s s - :< 3 Navajo Blade only . 
SS7S3K Complete Kit 



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IHOW TO MAKE KNIVES 
By Richard W. Barney and Robert W. 
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BO K 101 1 1 .95 

I HOW TO MAKE F0I DING KNIVES 

] A Slep-by-Slep How-To by Ron Lake, 
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CUSTOM KNIFEMAKING 

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BOSCK . ..„. „..,. 17.96 

THE COMPLETE BLADESMITH 
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OVDA2 
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Power 
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Wk, Disl. 
20" 
14" 
10" 
8" 
6" 



Price 
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J3A.J_.DOJR 




CAT.* H.P. 



3yr. 
Warranty 



SHAFT 
RPM 1)1 A. PRICE 



BL114 1/4 1800 1/2" 169.95 

BL111 1/3 3600 1/2" 169.95 

BL332B 3/4 1800 3/4" 356.95 

BL333B 3/4 3600 3/4" 356.95 



KNIFE SHARPENING KIT 

I sed by prolcssimiaJs lur razor clean edges on 
cutlery. One wlteel for sharpemng, another for 
cleaning and polishing, all compounds and 
instructions included- Includes bushings to fit 
SflF' or 1/2" arbor. 

WKS800 8" se* 19.95 




WHEEL & COMPOUND KIT 

Kit includes;: 
Four 3/4" 
it wed muslin 
wheels one 
3/4" loose 
muslin wheel, 
one each grease less brush-on culling com- 
pound in grils 240, 320 and 400. one blcndine, 
bar,, one bar of while run tie and a 
polishing guide. 

Specify Arbor Size {\/2'\ 5/8", 3/4") 

6 M Kit„„ 59,95 

R" Kit „ 79.95 

10" Kit 99.95 



TRADITIONAL 
CUTLERY KIT 




1 1 pe. traditional style culler? sel mclude* pre- 
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122 /BLADE 



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MARCH 2006 



- - -- - ',~~ **2C£H. 



nfeSMUMtfll 




/fe/f/7 Ouye's folder has a 3 3/4-inch 
wharncliffe blade ofATS-34 stainless. 
The handles are bead-blasted titanium. 
His list price to make a similar piece 
(available in February): $450. (Lum 
knife photo) 

JACK DAVENPORT 

Age: 61. 

Specialties: Multi-blades, including a 
swayback jack, coffin jack, saddlehorn, 
eureka jack, dogleg jack, doctor's knife 
and gunstock jack, all in two different 
sizes, Texas jack, tear drop and eight of 
the 16 original Remington Bullet pat- 
terns ... Also, a drop-point-hunter-and- 
skinner combo in a pancake sheath with 
a belt loop; automatics. 

Most Popular Knife: Saddlehorn. 

Sharp Tidbits: Jack has been making 
slip joints part time for 18 years and plans 
to go full time when he retires in about 
a year ... Largely self-taught, though 
he has "leaned on other [makers] when 
it came to the mechanics and dynamics 
of slip joints" ... Mentors include Tony 
Bose, Gene Shadley, Terry Davis and 
Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fam- 
er© Frank Centofante ... Gleaned much 
of his auto-making knowledge from Bill 
McHenry and Jason Williams. "That ex- 



Prowler 

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BLADE/ 123 




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The knife that won Tommy Gann the 
George Peck Award for best knife 
submitted by an ABS journeyman smith 
applicant at the BLADE Show is this 
stately bowie with a 9-inch blade of 52100 
and a contoured black-ash-burl handle. 
Tommy's list price for a similar piece: 
$900-$1,100. (Point Seven knife photo) 




perience made multi-blade making even 
easier" . . . Will take custom orders if they 
are something he really wants to do. 






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124 /BLADE 



Godson^ Ultimate Custom ($2,500) 
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How He Keeps Up: "I look at what 
the other guys are turning out. I emulate 
that up to a point and see what I can add 
to the knife that they're not offering." 

Steels: CPM 154, CPM S60V, RWL- 
34 and D-2. 

Handles: Prefers white and black-lip 
mother-of-pearl; also uses bone, elephant 
and ancient ivory, stag and black-pin 
shell, the latter almost pure black and 
scratch resistant. 

Price Ranges: A two-blade slip joint 
(Micarta® handle and no shield) starts at 
$750, to $2,800 and up. 

Other Sources For His Knives: Pur- 
veyors Dan Delavan (plazacutlery.com), 
Dave Ellis (ExquisiteKnives.com) and 
KnifeLegends.com (John Hanlon and 
Paul Shindler). 

Shows He Attends: BLADE, Guild, 
Florida Knifemakers Association and 
Gator Cutlery Club. 

What You Should Know: When re- 
producing old English patterns, Jack 
dyes and jigs the bone for the handles, 
threads the bolsters and fileworks the 
liners ... Also does scrimshaw. 

Future Sharp: Plans to make a "trick 
knife" for the BLADE Show . . . Learning 
engraving and buying the equipment to 
do it; hopes to attend the one-week GRS 
school ... Will make one or two autos a 
year that focus more on design, style and 
mechanics than embellishment. 



KEITH OUYE 

Age: 60. 

Specialties: 



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BLADE/ 125 




HARRISON CUSTOM KNIVES 

by Dan Harrison 




Making Custom Knives 
For Over 50 Years 



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Gary lames made this wedding cake 
set for his niece for her wedding. The 
Samuel-Bell-style bowie boasts a 
blade of 440C that Gary machined, 
ground, fileworked and heat treated. 
He forged the handle frame in a twist 
pattern of 1084 and 15N20 steels. 
The handles are mother-of-pearl. A 
handsome presentation case of curly 
cherry (not pictured) by Forrest Bogg 
accompanies the set. (SharpByCoop. 
com knife photo) 



models, all larger folders about 5 inch- 
es closed, employing the Lee Williams 
"rhino nipper concept." 

Sharp Tidbits: Having retired four 
years ago, Keith has been amassing 
equipment and making knives for two 
years and is basically full time ... He re- 
ceived most of his training from visiting 
the shops of veteran knifemakers, both 
in Hawaii and in the USA, with Stan Fu- 
jisaka serving as his mentor ... All en- 
graving on Keith's knives is by C.J. Cai 
(www.caiengraving.com) ... Keith does 
not take custom orders because he said 
he is not proficient enough yet to do so, 
though he does have a short list of po- 
tential buyers. "I would like to improve 
on the fit and finish of my current mod- 



126 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




Ford Swauger's "Dial-a-Matic" won Best 
Folder at the 2005 BLADE Show West. It 
is a double-action auto with a dial under 
the bolster that you turn back to open the 
knife and forward to unlock and close it. 
The 4 1/2-inch blade is the maker's mo- 
saic damascus and the handle is giraffe 
bone. Ford's list price to make a similar 
piece: $2,000. (BladeGallery.com knife 
photo) 




els before taking on something new. One 
would only have to look at my pile of 
wasted steel to understand why." 

How He Keeps Up: Attends as many 
knife shows as possible, where he dis- 
cusses knifemaking techniques with oth- 
er makers and suppliers, most recently 
the Art Knife Invitational coupled with a 
visit to Ken McFall at Knife & Gun Fin- 
ishing Supplies. 

Steels: Mostly ATS-34, some CPM 
S30V. 

Handles: Made with 0.070 liners and 
0.100 titanium scales ... Also uses G-10 
and anticipates using stabilized wood for 
handles and bolsters ... Pivot pins and 
stop pins are 3/16 inch ... Keith shapes 
his titanium clips to allow for a low pro- 
file in the pocket. 

Price Ranges: $450-$500 for basic 
styles, up to $1,000 on engraved knives. 

Future Sharp: Currently working on 
a straight knife employing a blade style 
of one of his folders that he hopes to have 
ready for the Las Vegas Custom Knife 
Show in February ... Also learning file- 
work from Bill Ruple, how to anodize 
and Fujisaka's bolster-making procedure 
for folders. 

GARY IAMES 
Age: 60. 

Specialties: Bowies; also some lock- 
ing-liner folders, wedding sets and a lim- 



REPRESENTING 

THE OPPORTUNITY 

OF 

A LIFETIME 

FOR THE 

DISCRIMINATING 

COLLECT 




DAVID 
ELLIS 



ABS MASTERSMITH 
PURVEYOR 

380 S. Melrose Dr, ste 407 
Vista, CA 92081 

Daytime Ph: (760) 643-4032 Evening Ph: (760) 945-7177 
E-mail: ellis@mastersmith.com 



MARCH 2006 



blademag.com 



BLADE/ 127 



toF&Sa&^ 



ited amount of hunters. 

Sharp Tidbits: A Marine veteran who 
served in Vietnam and a retired law-en- 
forcement officer, Gary has some machine 
shop training from his gunsmithing past . . . 
Early mentors include Al Warren and J.P. 
Moss. Credits books and videos and lurk- 
ing on the Internet knife forums for much 
of his development, as well as the contribu- 
tions of ABS master smith Tim Hancock 
(grinding in particular) ... Met other of 
his "mentors" through Michael Vagnino's 
Sierra Forge and Fire knifemaking school 
in Exeter, California. Gary volunteered 
as a teacher's aide and worked for/under 
Hancock, Vagnino, Rick Dunkerley, Jim 
Rodebaugh and Josh Smith ... An ABS 
apprentice smith, Gary does filework and 
learned engraving under John Baraclough 
in an NRA gunsmithing course . . . On cus- 
tom orders: "I'm not sure I want to have the 
pressure [of accepting them]. I will work 
with anybody, if it fits my skill level." 

How He Keeps Up: Reads and watch- 
es just about every knifemaking book 
and video, respectively, he can. Among 
the former he lauds BLADE'S Guide 
To Making Knives; among the latter he 
praises the offerings of Center Cross, in- 
cluding videos on fileworking (featuring 
Dwayne Dushane) and sheathmaking. 

Steels: 440C, ATS-34, 5160 and 1080; 
damascus. 

Handles: Mostly natural materials, 
including stabilized burls, ironwood, 
and some mastodon ivory and mother- 
of-pearl. 

Future Sharp: He got into making 
wedding sets after building one for his 
niece. "I'd like to do something with the 
wedding sets. I really think it's a niche 
I might be effective in. It's an heirloom 
that can be passed on and I think it's an 
item a lot of brides would like to have" 
... Wants to learn how to make toma- 
hawks under BLADE® field editor Joe 
Szilaski . . . Has never exhibited at a knife 
show, though he "might be ready for the 



Other Makers To Watch 



Other makers who bear close scru- 
tiny for the coming year include 
Ryan Bailey, Thad Buchanan, Randy 
Golden, Jeremy Krammes, Sean 
O'Hare, Johnny Perry, Shane Siebert, 
Steve Skiff, Chris Smith, David Stier, 
Michael Tison, Hans Wienmueller 
and Dave Winch. There are, no doubt, 
others. Whom did we omit? Write us 
at BLADE®, 700 E. State St., Iola, WI 
54990 blademagazine@krause.com 
and let us know. 



Bay Area Knife Collectors Association 
Show" ... Working on his forging skills 
in hopes of one day testing for ABS jour- 
neyman smith. 



"I make special 

knives one at 

a time." 

— Ford Sw auger 



TOMMY GANN 
Age: 34. 

Specialties: Mostly fixed blades, in- 
cluding bowies, hunters and daggers, 
and kitchen knives; working on folders. 

Most Popular Model: A 9 1/2-inch 
pig sticker. "A lot of guys hunt pigs 
around here." A 3-inch skinner also does 
well for him, though he "probably enjoys 
making bowies most of all." 

Big Break: In addition to earning 
his ABS journeyman smith stamp at the 
2005 BLADE Show, Tommy won the 
ABS' George Peck Award for submitting 
the best knife among the journeyman 
smith applicants. 

Sharp Tidbits: A full-time maker, 
Tommy has been at it for about five years. 
Thanks to his membership in a pipefit- 
ters' union, he met Tim Hancock who, in 
addition to being an ABS master smith, 
is also a local welding inspector. Like 
Gary lames, Tommy spent time in Han- 
cock's shop, "going through the proce- 
dures of making a knife, forging, a little 
of everything. Tim would be honest with 
me, tell me when I needed to go back to 
the basics or that I was getting too fancy 
too fast. He advanced my career by 10 
years." As a result, Tommy said a lot of 
his knives resemble Hancock's — which 
can be a good thing ... Tommy does 
some filework ... He accepts custom or- 
ders and has a backlog of three months. 

How He Keeps Up: Attends local ham- 
mer-ins, where he asks lots of questions, 
and reads knife books and magazines. 

Steels: 52100 for his carbon blades, and 
52100 and 15N20 or 1084 and 15N20 for 
his damascus; ATS-34 for kitchen knives. 

Handles: All kinds of woods, stag 
and some mammoth ivory. 

Price Ranges: $200-$l,100. 

Knife Shows He Attends: "As many 
as I can." 

Future Sharp: Studying damascus 
under Hancock and how to make art 
knives for when he goes for his ABS 



master smith stamp, tentatively in 2007 
... "I have a couple of good designs for 
hunters I'm working on that I think will 
change the whole industry outlook on 
hunting knives. I'm working with a lot of 
local hunters here, and a lot of them give 
good input on what works best for them" 
... Tommy wants to learn how to make a 
scale-release auto under the tutelage of 
ABS master smith Johnny Perry. 

FORD SWAUGER 

Age: 62. 

Specialties: Everything from tactical 
folders to high-end automatic art knives, 
though mainly the latter and mostly in 
damascus ... Makes two double-scale- 
release, double-action autos, as well as 
the "Dial-a-Matic" double-action auto 
with a dial under the bolster that you 
turn back to open the knife and forward 
to unlock and close it. It won Best Folder 
at the 2005 BLADE Show West. 

Sharp Tidbits: Retired from 32 years 
in the fire service. Ford has been making 
knives since 1994 ... Was a gunsmith for 
nine years, during which time he learned 
a lot about heat treating and making da- 
mascus; made a damascus muzzle loader 
... "I guess I'm full time, though I'm not 
trying to make a living at it. I make spe- 
cial knives one at a time" . . . Mentors in- 
clude Butch Vallotton, BLADE field edi- 
tor Wayne Goddard and Gay Rocha ... 
Ford does most all of the embellishment 
on his knives except for the engraving, 
"and I have done a little bit of that." He 
hand carves the handles and blades, in- 
cluding the damascus, and does filework 
... He makes his own damascus and mo- 
saic damascus ... Accepts custom orders 
and prefers selling his knives at knife 
shows. 

How He Keeps Up: Always looking 
for new ways of making damascus and 
different mechanisms. 

Steels: Damascus and mosaic damas- 
cus, including pure nickel, L-6, 1095 
and O-l, in patterns from Turkish twist 
to canned steel with powdered metal ... 
Does his own heat treating. 

Handles: Natural materials, includ- 
ing ancient ivories and mother-of-pearl, 
and some giraffe bone, though he "likes 
to stay with the more exotic stuff." 

Price Ranges: $600-$2,500. 

Shows He Attends: Oregon, BLADE 
Show West, Arizona Knife Collectors 
and, tentatively, BLADE. 

Future Sharp: Is working on a dial- 
operated out-the-front auto ... Wants to 
eventually try some stainless for blades, 
and titanium and beryllium for bolsters. 

For the contact information for the makers 
in the story, see "Where To Get 'Em " on 
page 98. 



128 /BLADE 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 




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D ^g&taa 




Svelte 



The mechanism of Charles Kain's 
double-action automatic is reportedly 
so tiny that it enables the maker to 
contain the knife's overall thickness to 
under 1/4 inch. (Kain photo) 



Sylph 



Spec Check 



Knife Sylph DA #2 
Maker Charles Kain 
Pattern Double-action auto 
Blade Steel Multi-bar twist damas- 
cus of 1084 and 15N20 carbon steels 
and cable 

Handle Mosaic damascus 
Lockbar and Spacer Random-pat- 
tern damascus 
Maker's List Price $1,500 



130 /BLADE 



By BLADE® staff 



The mechanism for Charles Kain's 
"Sylph DA #2" double-action 
auto is so small that it can fit into 
plates no thicker than 85 thousandths 
of an inch. According to Charles, the 
mechanism's tiny size enables him to 
contain the knife's overall thickness to 
under 1/4 of an inch — a slim gem of a 
double-action auto — while still leaving 
room for a robust blade. The knife has a 



Charles Kain's "Sylph 
DA #2" is a slim gem 
of a double-action auto 



built-in safety to guard against acciden- 
tal opening. 

For more information contact Charles 
Kain, Dept. BL3, 38 South Main St., 
Indianapolis, IN 46227 317.781.8556 or 
877.475.2051 charles@kaincustomknives. 
com, www.kaincustomknives.com. 



blademag.com 



MARCH 2006 








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source code # M0BL06A V^rlj -^g^ SWORDS 

J ^ HANWEI 
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